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Fundamentals Success: A Course Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking

Fundamentals Success: A Course Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking,

Here are the techniques nursing students need to develop, apply, and refine their reasoning skills and gain the confidence needed to pass exams. With more than 1,475 classroom-tested, NCLEX-style questions that cover an entire nursing fundamentals course, this book provides a blueprint for applying critical thinking skills to answering the test questions that students will encounter throughout their nursing education. Extensive field testing with students and faculty ensures that all of the questions provide the information and test-taking experience students need to succeed. BONUS! New CD-ROM with two 75-question final exams.
100-question final exam, with answers and comprehensive rationales.
Completely revised and up-to-date to reflect the latest medical technology, practice guidelines, and standards of nursing practice.
100 new format questions in a single chapter multiple response, fill-in-the blank, hot spot drag and drop/ordered response items, and exhibit items that require a response to picture, chart, graph or table.
100 additional new format questions spread across 24 content areas.

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Exam asks students to apply critical thinking skills to real-life situations

Exam asks students to apply critical thinking skills to real-life situations

July 10, 2014 at 8:13 PM EDT

108112 108109 108109 Exam tests students using real-life situations A new report finds that U.S. students’ financial literacy is only average compared to students worldwide. So what can be done to improve the performance of our schools? Education correspondent John Merrow reports on one test that may help American students compete more successfully in an increasingly global economy. 2014-07-10 18:00:00 disabled 2365286989 RCFnDcMrC00 186415 186416 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/explaining-scandals-lies-incivility-2016-election-teens/ Teaching teens election’s ‘scandals, lies and incivility’ The 2016 election mudslinging from “crooked” Hillary Clinton and “dangerously incoherent” Donald Trump has even piqued the interest of teens — and made teaching high school civics that much more difficult. So it’s time to get creative, which one 12th grade government teacher has done with his ‘scandals, lies and incivility’ curriculum. Education Week’s Lisa Stark reports for the NewsHour. 2016-07-12 18:00:00 http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/mtg3-320x196.jpg 2365801349 u2514Pbw7RM 185720 185710 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/are-young-kids-losing-the-brain-boosting-benefits-of-playtime/ How much playtime should the youngest students get? As kindergarten and pre-k have become more academically rigorous, some worry that the very youngest students may be missing out on crucial development through abundant playtime. But other educators believe setting high expectations for achievement helps kids, especially low-income students, excel. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports. 2016-07-05 18:00:00 http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kids-playing-320x196.jpg 2365796696 qJ4ZbhSFfW0 185108 185089 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/innovative-program-helps-even-the-playing-field-for-poor-students-and-boost-graduation-rates/ Unique college program helps poor students make the grade For Georgia State’s Tyler Mulvenna, a $900 grant from an innovative retention program let him live on campus, work less and do what he came to do: study. The school, worried about abysmal graduation rates for poor students found, a full course load, commuting and holding a job was just too much for many. The NewsHour's April Brown takes a look at the program praised by President Barack Obama. 2016-06-28 18:00:00 http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/RTR33OS4-320x196.jpg 2365792862 FvOzh4Nirh8

A new report finds that U.S. students’ financial literacy is only average compared to students worldwide. So what can be done to improve the performance of our schools? Education correspondent John Merrow reports on one test that may help American students compete more successfully in an increasingly global economy.

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GWEN IFILL: A new report finds that U.S. students’ financial literacy is only average compared to students worldwide. American students also don’t do any better on other international tests which assess math, reading and science skills.

  • How do students in the United States compare to those around the world?
  • Mixed messages on whether U.S. students will be well-prepared for the workforce
  • How does American education measure up to schools around the globe?

What can be done to improve the performance of our schools?

Education correspondent John Merrow has our report.

JOHN MERROW: It’s testing day for at Baltimore City College High School in Baltimore, Maryland. Students won’t arrive for another hour, but the adults in charge are already here, including Jill Morgan of CTB/McGraw Hill, the company that administers and scores the tests.

JILL MORGAN, CTB/McGraw Hill: The test is math, science and reading. It’s a continuous test and it’s approximately two hours’ times, and then it’s followed by a 35-minute questionnaire.

JOHN MERROW: At first glance, it looks like a typical multiple choice exam, the kind that federal law requires every third through eight grader and 10th grader to take in math and reading.

It’s a test Jack Dale, former superintendent of Fairfax County, Virginia, Public Schools is very familiar with.

JACK DALE, Former Superintendent, Fairfax County Public Schools: Typically, in our Virginia Standards of Learning test or the Maryland, it tends to focus more on what we call giving back information, regurgitation of facts and figures.

JOHN MERROW: American students are already the most tested in the world. Do schools really need another one?

PETER KANNAM, America Achieves: The value of this is 15-year-olds across the globe can take this, and so you can take it and see how your school is doing against Singapore, Finland, and Spain.

JOHN MERROW: Peter Kannam works with America Achieves, which coordinates the tests in the U.S. He argues that this one is necessary because it evaluates schools, the depth and rigor of their curriculum. Are they challenging their students to think critically, for example?

PETER KANNAM: Instead of just having someone solve a problem and bubble in the answer, it’s basically explaining your thought process, like a multistep word problem in math, or a text where you have to justify your response.

JOHN MERROW: The exam was developed by OECD, the organization that administers the international tests known as PISA, for Program for International Student Assessment. PISA is given in 70 countries every three years. The results allow nations to compare their education systems and measure their own progress.

The PISA assessment is one of the best assessments to evaluate critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

JOHN MERROW: Skills, Kannam argues, that are essential if American workers are going to compete successfully in an increasingly global economy. This exam isn’t given to every student, just a carefully drawn sample, because it’s designed to measure aspects of the school, not individual students.

At this school, only 83 of the 1,300 students will take the exam.

JACK DALE: And so the question is, can you get a representative sample of your kids in your school or do you always need to test 100 percent of the kids? Well, statistically, the answer is, you can get by with a representative sample.

JOHN MERROW: Giving this test to every student would be prohibitively expensive, because about half the questions require written answers and calculations, and those answers cannot be graded by a machine.

JILL MORGAN: You will have two hours to work on the test and then 35 minutes to complete the questionnaire.

JOHN MERROW: Reading from a prepared script, Morgan starts with a practice question. She directs the students’ attention to a table showing winning times for running events at the 2008 Olympics.

JILL MORGAN: Which one of the following was the most likely running time for the gold medalist in the women’s 800-meter race?

JOHN MERROW: The exam asks students to apply their reading, math and science skills to real-life situations. For example, they may be asked to analyze different cell phone plans to figure out which is the best deal.

MELIA GREENE: It allowed me to think differently. With standardized tests, you have to study for them as more of kind of reciting knowledge. But with this test, it’s more about drawing back on things you have learned throughout your life.

MALAYSIA MCGINNIS: It’s a better measure of how we apply information that we already know, instead of just seeing if we can recall something.

JOHN MERROW: After completing the math, reading and science portion of the exam, the students answer questions about their attitudes toward teachers, their school and their courses.

MELIA GREENE: I thought it was very interesting that they want to know about our lives and how we view math and science, and I think, if it was for a survey, it would help whatever research they were doing.

JOHN MERROW: Jack Dale had some Fairfax County high schools participate in a pilot test of the new exam in 2012. He was eager to find out how his schools measured up against the rest of the world.

JACK DALE: I wanted to find out, number one, were we, are we as good as we thought we were? And we were. The higher up you are, the better your reading score was.

JOHN MERROW: Each circle represents a different school.

JACK DALE: Left and right on this one has to do with a student’s perception of their relationship with their teachers.

JOHN MERROW: This says, OK, the teacher-student relationship is not as strong as we adults thought it was.

JACK DALE: Yes. Yes. And so we said, ah, you know what? We have been focusing on relevance and rigor. We also need to focus on the relationships and engage the kids to make sure that they can have as role models people they respect and admire called their teachers.

JOHN MERROW: Participating schools get a comprehensive 150-page report. Dale, who now consults part time for America Achieves, showed me the kind of detailed analysis the report produces.

JACK DALE: They actually rate your kids across six different scoring levels. The higher the level, the better off you are.

JOHN MERROW: Ideally, you want as many kids over here as possible.

JACK DALE: Over in five and six.

JOHN MERROW: The United States has about 27,000 public high schools. This year, about 300 elected to pay $11,500 to have a sample of their students take the exam.

JACK DALE: That is not a large dollar amount compared to the entire junior class being assessed.

JOHN MERROW: Is it your view that, as this test catches on, we can do fewer of the bubble tests that kids take?

JACK DALE: Absolutely.

JOHN MERROW: Are you then pushing a revolution?

JACK DALE: Am I pushing a revolution? I think what — in many respects, I think what the United States needs to do is catch up with the revolution that has occurred throughout the rest of the world.

JOHN MERROW: While many critics of standardized testing would like nothing more than to see those bubble tests diminish, the chances of that happening right now seems slim. Most states are changing to new curricula based on the new Common Core state standards. That will most likely mean more standardized testing for students. Testing schools may be on the back burner for a while.

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Critical Thinking Final Exam - College Essays - 1426 Words

Critical Thinking Final Exam

Axia College Material
Appendix B

* Access the Electronic Reserve Readings link on your student Web site for Week Nine. * Select one of the topics below and read both articles that present opposing sides of the argument surrounding that topic.

* Animal experimentation
* Outsourcing
* Media violence

* Answer the following questions in paragraphs of approximately 100 words demonstrating your critical and creative thinking skills.

1. Identify if the topic you chose, as presented by both articles, is a problem or an issue and explain what makes it a problem or an issue. If you believe the articles present both problems and issues, identify and explain what the problems are and what the issues are.

The article I chose to discus was the Media violence topic. I believe that this topic is an issue. I believe it’s an issue because there are arguments that can defend both sides. One article believes that media violence is proven to have a direct impact on viewers. The other article believes that the research produces no clear answers on the subject. Many people react to things they see in the media differently. Some may be easily influenced by the violence, but other may not be affected by the violence at all. So by not being able to prove the argument either way, this makes it an issue and not a problem.

2. Were the problems or issues expressed effectively? Describe how the problems or issues were or were not best expressed.

The issues were expressed effectively. They both did a good job at making their cases and arguing their points. The article that was arguing that media violence has been exaggerated gave and compared multiple sources and statistics to back their argument. They gave pretty good details on why media violence is not that big of a factor. The other article used information that they gathered from doing research. The issues that were not best expressed was where did they do they research and what kind of environment were the studies done. This plays a major factor in how the media violence affects people.

3. How would you determine the credibility of the sources of information used by the authors in the articles when investigating the problems or issues presented by your topic?

They both used credible sources. They both used sources from professionals who actually study the topic as a living. The article arguing that the media violence has been exaggerated used government sources that monitor and study this topic and its activities. This article also used a psychology source that studies violent behaviors and their causes. The article arguing that media violence does promote violent behavior used scientific sources from universities that study violent behaviors and their causes. One of their sources was the Office of the Surgeon General which is a very reliable source when it comes to learning about the affects of violence in the media.

4. Compare two steps that would be most effective in refining solutions to the problem and resolutions to the issues presented by your topic.

Step 1 would be to decide which action should be taken. This step consists of asking and answering question. Questions such as:
What exactly is to be done?
How is it to be done?
By whom is it to be done?
Will those doing it volunteer for the job or be assigned to it Will these individuals need to be trained?

Step 2 would be recognizing and overcoming difficulties. You should consider this step because no matter how carefully a plan has been conceived, it is likely to encounter difficulties. You should check for common kinds of imperfections such as: Safety

Convenience
Efficiency
Economy
Simplicity
Compatibility.

5. Identify three strategies that could help you foster criticism when evaluating both arguments for your topic.

Three steps that can help me foster criticism when evaluating both.

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A Level in Critical Thinking (Full AS A2) H052 H452, Oxford College

A Level in Critical Thinking (Full AS+A2) H052 H452 A Level in Critical Thinking (Full AS+A2) H052 H452 A Level in Critical Thinking (Full AS+A2) H052 H452

AS Critical Thinking Why choose Critical Thinking?

Critical Thinking develops the ability to make sense of arguments and ideas. People who question what they read in the newspaper and enjoy reading between the lines, by analysing the language used in a logical way, will enjoy this course. As well as being lively and enjoyable in its own right it can help improve study and communication skills. On this basis, Critical Thinking can be a very useful way to support the study of other subjects and improve your performance in other subjects.

Learning about critical thinking provides a framework for you to weigh up all of the information that you are bombarded with every day. This may be very helpful when you are studying other subjects. It helps develop the skill of reading for meaning. Rather than skimming through a newspaper article, a technical report or a difficult chapter in a book, you should become better equipped to take what you have read to pieces. You are given a discipline to see what somebody is really saying and whether you are convinced by it, rather than taking them at face value. By the end of the course you may also be better able to construct an argument yourself.

The course is divided into two units, each of which is divided into several sections. There are a large number of activities to do. The course is skills based rather than content based. In other words, there is not very much to commit to memory. It is more about practising and developing skills. The answers to all the activities are included with the course notes. At various points you will complete one of the assignments and send it to your tutor for marking. Each unit corresponds to a unit as set out in the syllabus and an examination. The lessons also broadly correspond to sections of the units in the syllabus. It is important that you will study the lessons in the right sequence. However you should be aware that Critical Thinking is very much an integrated subject – try and see the links between terms and concepts as you go along. The units are divided up as follows:

UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL THINKING

Part A – the language of reasoning 3.1.1 What is an argument?
  • What is an argument?
  • Some basic rules of arguments
  • Using common notation as shorthand
3.1.2 The elements of an argument
  • What are argument indicators?
  • Counter arguments
  • The use of counter claims
  • Providing evidence
  • Providing examples
  • Hypothetical reasoning
  • Assumptions
3.1.3 How strong is the evidence in a reason?
  • Evaluating evidence
  • How big was the sample?
  • Was the sample representative?
  • How and when was the evidence collected?
  • How is the evidence presented?
  • Alternative interpretations of statistics
  • How well does a reason support the conclusion?
Part B – Credibility 3.1.4 What is credibility? 3.1.5 Credibility criteria
  • Is the evidence plausible?
  • Is the source an eye witness?
  • Is there corroboration?
  • To what extent are different sources consistent with each other?
  • Is there any suggestion of bias?
  • Does the source have a vested interest?
  • Is the source neutral?
  • Can the source be seen as expert?
  • Does the source have a positive reputation?
3.1.6 A guide to the unit one exam
  • How the exam works
  • What do I need to be able to do?
  • How to give a good answer
  • Practice makes perfect!
UNIT 2 ASSESSING AND DEVELOPING ARGUMENT Part A – Further points on components 3.2.1 Some things that are not an argument 3.2.2 Intermediate conclusions 3.2.3 Analogies 3.2.4 Principles 3.2.5 Drawing conclusions Part B – spotting problems with an argument - types of flaw 3.2.6 Inconsistency and contradiction 3.2.7 Types of flaw
  • Wrong actions
  • Unwarranted assumption of a causal relationship
  • Generalisation
  • Restricting the options
  • Slippery slope
  • Circular argument
  • Confusing necessary and sufficient conditions
  • Conflation
  • Straw person
  • Ad hominem flaws
  • Arguing from one thing to another
3.2.8 Irrelevant appeals Part C – Developing your own reasoned argument Part D – Guide to the unit 2 exam

Recommended textbook and use of the web

Although the course material provides explanations of the whole syllabus you are strongly advised to purchase a copy of OCR Critical Thinking AS by Jo Lally and others. It is published by Heinemann. (ISBN 978-0-435235-89-5). The book provides clear explanations and contains many activities.

At the front of the book is a CD which contains, among other things, the answers to the activities.

There are no websites specific to AS Critical Thinking except www.criticalthinking.org.uk PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS FOR THE PREVIOUS NOT THE CURRENT SPECIFICATION HOWEVER.

On the critical thinking website you will see a useful links section, though as the creator of the website admits, there isn’t much else out there.

Finally, the OCR website (www.ocr.org.uk) contains full details of the syllabus and sample exam papers with answers.

Studying Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking is a broad, contemporary and “real world” subject.

Students probably need to have passed GCSE level English Language to do well on the course. There is no mathematics element but there is a need to have a go at interpreting figures and understanding some basic mathematical concepts such as averages and percentages at a fairly basic level.

AS EXAMS - Exam board: OCR - Code: HO52

Unit 1 Introduction to Critical Thinking (20% of total A level marks)

1.5 hour written paper. Answer all questions. Candidates will be presented with 2 or more passages, totalling 900 words.

Candidates answer short answer questions and more discursive answers

Unit 2 Assessing and Developing Argument (30% of total A level marks)

1.5 hour written paper. Answer all questions. The paper has 2 parts and candidates answer all questions. Section A: contains multiple choice questions. Section B: Short answer questions after analysing a passage. Section C: short answer questions and construction of one or more further arguments.

Exams available January and June

FURTHER DETAILS OF SYLLABUS AND EXAMS AVAILABLE ON OCR WEBSITE (www.ocr.org.uk) Please refer to these details in preparation for exams, not this brief summary.

A2 Critical Thinking THE COURSE

The course is divided into two units, each of which is divided into several sections. There are a large number of activities to do. The course is skills based rather than content based. In other words, there is not very much to commit to memory. It is more about practising and developing skills. The answers to all the activities are included with the course notes. At various points you will complete one of the assignments and send it to your tutor for marking.

Each unit corresponds to a unit as set out in the syllabus and an examination. The lessons also broadly correspond to sections of the units in the syllabus. It is important that you will study the lessons in the right sequence. However you should be aware that Critical Thinking is very much an integrated subject – try and see the links between terms and concepts as you go along. The units are divided up as follows:

UNIT 3: ETHICAL REASONING AND DECISION MAKING

3.3.1 Ethical reasoning
  • Conflicting ideas
  • Social, political, religious and moral factors
  • More on hypothetical reasoning
  • Different responses, different criteria
3.3.2 Dilemmas, applying principles and decision making
  • The nature of a dilemma
  • Constructing arguments
UNIT 4 CRITICAL REASONING 3.4.1 Analysis and evaluation of complex arguments
  • Assumptions
  • Valid and invalid arguments
  • Syllogisms
  • Sustained suppositional reasoning
  • Sustained counter-argument
  • Relationship between components
  • Independent or joint?
  • Smaller arguments, counter arguments and explanations
  • Not part of an argument?
  • Evaluating strength and weakness
3.4.2 Developing your own cogent and complex arguments

Studying Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking is a broad, contemporary and “real world” subject.

Students probably need to have passed GCSE level English Language to do well on the course. There is no mathematics element but there is a need to have a go at interpreting figures and understanding some basic mathematical concepts such as averages and percentages at a fairly basic level.

A2 EXAMS - Exam board: OCR - Code: H452

Unit 3 Ethical reasoning and decision making (25% of total A level marks)

1.5 hour written paper. Question paper is based on resource material including graphs, charts and diagrams. Exercise in applying general and ethical principles. Short or more discursive answers.

Unit 4 Critical reasoning (25% of total A level marks)

1.5 hour written paper. Complex materials in form of one or more passages, images, statistics etc. Short or more discursive answers dealing with analysis and evaluation. Also own further argument produced in response to the material.

FURTHER DETAILS OF SYLLABUS AND EXAMS AVAILABLE ON OCR WEBSITE (www.ocr.org.uk) Please refer to these details in preparation for exams, not this brief summary.

The number of study hours are variable according to student commitment, though it is recommended that candidates spend around 150 hours on AS, and 300 hours in total for the full A-level.

The titles of the qualifications as will appear on certificates are:

OCR Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Critical Thinking

OCR Advanced Level GCE in Critical Thinking