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Education Forum Gcse History Coursework

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There had been concern that some pupils may cheat with coursework

Traditional GCSE coursework is to be scrapped for most academic subjects following a report by exam watchdogs.

From 2009, it will be replaced by what is being called "controlled assessment", where pupils will do projects under supervision in class.

The changes come amid concerns about pupils cheating by copying from the internet or getting help from parents.

They will apply across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Science coursework will not be affected.

This is because science GCSE courses changed last year and much of the coursework involved is already done in school.

The changes follow a review by the exams and curriculum body for England the QCA, working closely with counterparts in Wales and Northern Ireland.

They will affect nine subjects, including English literature, geography and history.

A QCA report, published last autumn said GSCE coursework had become "less valid".

Two-thirds of teachers surveyed for the study had said they did not think coursework was valid and reliable.

It's important that we do not lose the positive side of coursework because of the problems of plagiarism

John Dunford, ASCL

The QCA says pupils doing supervised projects in class may work on their own or in groups, but they will be monitored by a teacher and access to books, the internet and other sources of information will be controlled.

Consultation is taking place about what kind of supervision there should be for this work, ranging from direct to loose.

There will also be reforms to the way coursework is set and marked. Currently teachers in each school design the work and mark it, and outside moderators check samples of results across the country.

In future the exam boards will set the coursework as well as the exams. Teachers will continue to mark that work, but the regulators say once coursework is more streamlined, it will be easier to moderate effectively.

The head of England's QCA, Ken Boston, said: "The ability of the GCSE to stretch and challenge young people has been reinforced by the proposals that examinations must include extended writing and more varied question types.

"Controlled assessments will increase public confidence in the GCSE and allow the integration of new sources of data and information, including the internet, under supervision."

Problems of plagiarism

Head teachers say they are pleased that coursework will not be lost altogether and will remain in the form of extended work done in school.

John Dunford of the Association of School and College Leaders said: "Coursework has a major contribution to make to exam grades because it can be used to test a much wider variety of knowledge and skills than a written exam lasting a couple of hours."

"I am pleased that calls for coursework to be abolished have been headed off by this proposal for it to be done under more controlled conditions and for that reason I support it.

"The internet has changed the parameters of coursework and the continued credibility of coursework marks depends upon the work being done under more controlled conditions. It's important that we do not lose the positive side of coursework because of the problems of plagiarism".

John Bangs from the National Union of Teachers said cheating was not widespread but the issue did need looking at.

"A review of coursework was long overdue, for example the drawing down of information from the internet and parents helping, but outright cheating was rare.

"Proposals have come forward without being trialled and I worry about undermining the confidence of parents and children in their results this year."

Other articles

OCR�s Pilot History GCSE - History: Curriculum Issues - The Education Forum

John Simkin 25 Jan 2006

A new vocational GCSE history course is beginning in September 2006. It includes a compulsory unit on medieval history and a list of options including one entitled �Heritage management and marketing�. How does a subject become vocational by including units like this? Anyone thinking of doing the course?

Richard Jones-Nerzic 25 Jan 2006

A new vocational GCSE history course is beginning in September 2006. It includes a compulsory unit on medieval history and a list of options including one entitled �Heritage management and marketing�. How does a subject become vocational by including units like this? Anyone thinking of doing the course?


If I was in the UK I would. Anything to break the Hitler monopoly has to be welcomed. I'd like to see heritage compulsory in the GCSE history course as well, although not management and marketing perspective. I have long argued that history teachers need to stop treating history students with a producer mentality that assumes kids are all wannabe historians. Most people encounter the past through heritage as consumers. Being able to deconstruct and decode heritage is as important as knowing how to do history.

Janice Dougan 25 Jan 2006

My school are part of the pilot, although I don't know much about it as yet. My HoD has been on a course though and, as I understand it, the heritage module is just one of the options you can pick. I must say I am quite keen to do some medieval at KS4, because we don't have a sixth form and so, up to now, I have only taught it to year 7. I will post again when I know more of how it is going to work.
Edited by Jan.D, 25 January 2006 - 10:36 PM.

Andy Walker 25 Jan 2006


A new vocational GCSE history course is beginning in September 2006. It includes a compulsory unit on medieval history and a list of options including one entitled “Heritage management and marketing”. How does a subject become vocational by including units like this? Anyone thinking of doing the course?


If I was in the UK I would. Anything to break the Hitler monopoly has to be welcomed. I'd like to see heritage compulsory in the GCSE history course as well, although not management and marketing perspective. I have long argued that history teachers need to stop treating history students with a producer mentality that assumes kids are all wannabe historians. Most people encounter the past through heritage as consumers.


With all due respect Richard you are talking palpable nonsense.
You clearly have not been teaching in the UK or in the state sector for a considerable amount of time.
There is, and cannot be, anything "vocational" about the study of history.
This new philistine GCSE is just another example of the apparently terminal decline in academic standards referred to in a separate thread today.
Education develops the mind and makes people singular - training (aka vocational education) equips computer programmers to programme, and I guess museum curators to rip tickets in half. Training is designed to make people behave in a particular way. The training of the workforce is not and should never be the business of educators.
In these dark Thatcherite days we need more citizens capable of critical thought not fewer.
I will discuss your remark about the "Hitler monopoly" in a separate thread in the morning.

Dan Lyndon 26 Jan 2006

Andy, oh so negative. Mind you so was I until I went to a talk by Jerome Freeman of QCA and he was very impressive. The vocational element comes more in the assessment of the course, with students being encouraged to use a lot more ICT. An example he gave would be to design a website for a local museum. What impressed me the most was the philosophy behind the move, which was very similar to the SHP approach. A global, national and local focus with a real effort to move into areas of history that have been moved off the mainstream curriculum at KS4. I was also impressed by the emphasis on parity with 'academic' GCSEs, with a strong focus on historical skills and making sure that this absolutely is not about 'dumbing down'.

Andy Walker 26 Jan 2006

Andy, oh so negative.


Quite the contrary young man, I am passionately positive in my defence of education over training. as should you be.

John Simkin 27 Jan 2006

I have long argued that history teachers need to stop treating history students with a producer mentality that assumes kids are all wannabe historians. Most people encounter the past through heritage as consumers. Being able to deconstruct and decode heritage is as important as knowing how to do history.


I disagree. I think we should be trying to produce historians. Not because they will be historians (although many will be � family history is currently the fastest growing hobby in the UK) but because they need to become active citizens. The last thing I want them to be is passive consumers of culture.

Andy Walker 27 Jan 2006

I disagree. I think we should be trying to produce historians.


I agree - largely because by becoming sound historians they will develop the critical skills necessary to develop as thinking citizens.

I also have a number of issues with the concept of vocational education which I believe is essentially built on a falsehood.

Back in 1976 Prime Minister James Callaghan made his Ruskin speech which sparked this continuing and strange idea that education should be closely linked to training and the world of work. Callaghan asserted that unemployment was rising because schools were not preparing students for the workplace. The logic followed therefore that if schools spent more time training students work related skills then unemployment would fall. Now one doesn't have to have a degree in economics (or indeed a vocational business studies GCSE) to understand what hogwash such an argument is. Unemployment can be reasonably discussed as being caused by cyclical problems in the economy, or can be reasonably discussed as an inevitable feature of a capitalist system which relies on a reserve army of labour to depress wages.

What is can't be is blamed on is what sort of GCSE or A level a student takes at school. The whole wave of meddling in education which followed including such "memorable" initiatives as CPVE, GNVQ, YTS, NVQ, AVCE, Key Skills (God help us) have been peddled on the basis of a poor politicians poor grasp of economic theory.

I am also troubled by the social take up of vocational over "academic" subjects. What we see of course is that if you are working class you are far more likely to end up on a vocational course of some sort. The great and the good in education don't seem to value it at all! Public schools don't run the courses and top universities don't recognise the qualifications when it comes to University entrance. Is this not because we have created a system where the rich and privileged get educated whereas the poor get trained for jobs which will keep them poor?

I work in a secondary modern school in a working class town. Why is it that my students do vocational courses whereas the children who attend the middle class selective grammar school next door overwhelmingly do academic subjects?

It is also important to think about the real purpose of education when assessing the value or otherwise of vocational education. Training is something you do to prepare a person to behave in a particular way. Education is about empowering people to think for themselves. This is a simple but important distinction we would all do well do dwell on.

It is perhaps symptomatic of the triumph of training over education in this country that we have a Prime Minister who cannot distinguish between fact or fantasy or truth and lies, and apparently and just as disturbingly a number of history teachers who seem to have forgotten why they trained.

John Simkin 28 Jan 2006

I agree - largely because by becoming sound historians they will develop the critical skills necessary to develop as thinking citizens.

I also have a number of issues with the concept of vocational education which I believe is essentially built on a falsehood.

Back in 1976 Prime Minister James Callaghan made his Ruskin speech which sparked this continuing and strange idea that education should be closely linked to training and the world of work. Callaghan asserted that unemployment was rising because schools were not preparing students for the workplace. The logic followed therefore that if schools spent more time training students work related skills then unemployment would fall. Now one doesn't have to have a degree in economics (or indeed a vocational business studies GCSE) to understand what hogwash such an argument is. Unemployment can be reasonably discussed as being caused by cyclical problems in the economy, or can be reasonably discussed as an inevitable feature of a capitalist system which relies on a reserve army of labour to depress wages.

What is can't be is blamed on is what sort of GCSE or A level a student takes at school. The whole wave of meddling in education which followed including such "memorable" initiatives as CPVE, GNVQ, YTS, NVQ, AVCE, Key Skills (God help us) have been peddled on the basis of a poor politicians poor grasp of economic theory.

I am also troubled by the social take up of vocational over "academic" subjects. What we see of course is that if you are working class you are far more likely to end up on a vocational course of some sort. The great and the good in education don't seem to value it at all! Public schools don't run the courses and top universities don't recognise the qualifications when it comes to University entrance. Is this not because we have created a system where the rich and privileged get educated whereas the poor get trained for jobs which will keep them poor?

I work in a secondary modern school in a working class town. Why is it that my students do vocational courses whereas the children who attend the middle class selective grammar school next door overwhelmingly do academic subjects?

It is also important to think about the real purpose of education when assessing the value or otherwise of vocational education. Training is something you do to prepare a person to behave in a particular way. Education is about empowering people to think for themselves. This is a simple but important distinction we would all do well do dwell on.

It is perhaps symptomatic of the triumph of training over education in this country that we have a Prime Minister who cannot distinguish between fact or fantasy or truth and lies, and apparently and just as disturbingly a number of history teachers who seem to have forgotten why they trained.


Great posting. One of the problems about an exam driven school system is what happens to those who have to play the role of failures. Why should they go along with this charade? As Paul Willis pointed out in Learning How to Labour, once students realize what is going on, the meaning of school changes. Their major objective is now to �have a laugh�. These students become difficult to control. The idea of getting a grade E at GCSE is fairly meaningless. Their exam results are only a means of letting people know what they can�t do.

This has always been a problem for teachers. I am of an age who remembers what it was like to teach CSE history.

As Andy has pointed out, over the years, attempts have been made to provide non-academic examination courses based on vocational skills. Geography teachers have embraced this idea and every year thousands of students do courses in �Tourism�. They are persuaded to believe that this will enable them to get managerial posts in the industry. This is of course a lie. The people who do those jobs will have academic qualifications. True, many of those with vocational qualifications in Tourism will find themselves working in the industry. However, it will have nothing to do with their qualifications. In fact, it will have everything to do with their lack of qualifications. They will be doing jobs like cleaning hotel rooms and serving at tables.

Richard Jones-Nerzic 28 Jan 2006


I have long argued that history teachers need to stop treating history students with a producer mentality that assumes kids are all wannabe historians. Most people encounter the past through heritage as consumers. Being able to deconstruct and decode heritage is as important as knowing how to do history.


I disagree. I think we should be trying to produce historians. Not because they will be historians (although many will be � family history is currently the fastest growing hobby in the UK) but because they need to become active citizens. The last thing I want them to be is passive consumers of culture.


The last thing I want them to be is passive consumers of culture. As I said in the post you replied to 'Being able to deconstruct and decode heritage is as important as knowing how to do history.' ie I think students should learn the critical analysis skills associated with doing history in the classroom, but in addition they need to equipped to be critical, reflective consumers of heritage. I don't think we do this as well as we might at the moment. All the history exams I prepare students for (except my own) excusively focus on the analysis of primary sources or (to a lesser extent) the writings of historians, ie. what historians work with or what historians do. This is 'past orientated' working with the past. I don't think this prepares students to understand 'present orientated' working with the past ie heritage.

I suppose it might be argued that by default, having recognised the characteristics of 'real' history, students can spot 'fake' heritage and dismiss it as such. But for me there are at least two problems with this:

1. Heritage can look a lot like history.
2. Heritage should not be dismissed.

Janice Dougan 05 Feb 2006

"These students become difficult to control. The idea of getting a grade E at GCSE is fairly meaningless. Their exam results are only a means of letting people know what they can�t do."

Well if this is the case, and the current GCSE history patently does not meet their needs, why not let these pupils have a go at the new vocational GCSE and see how they get on with that?

GCSE History Coursework

GCSE History Coursework

Monday, November 19, 2007

The implementation of the General Certificate for Secondary Education or GCSE has lead to a more advanced principle in providing education for students. This program has been widely accepted as a medium to incorporate all the abilities of a person into a higher form of learning like high school or college. The main philosophy of taking the certification exam is to enable a student to fulfill a requirements when applying for a college acceptance in the future.

Some programs are directly linked to the way a GCSE is handed down to student applicants. However, aside from the normal day to day class, a GCSE coursework may also be taken. This however does not reflect readily the whole capacity of a student. What it intends to do is to provide supplemental learning aspects for the person to pass. We can take a look at one common example which is the GCSE History coursework .

Technically, there are many types of coursework related to history that can be taken by a student. Depending on what the instructor prefers, you will be required to submit completed projects which are based on the instructional mediums. One example is the creation of a history essay for reports. These kinds of projects provide a better chance for the student to familiarize himself about the past events within a certain society. With some instructors, the whole idea of giving essay requirements is to enable the student remember important dates and events. Some of them may obviously appear in exams at the later stage of the qualifying program. Just like in high school essay writing. projects are linked to the actual creation of examinations.

A GCSE coursework is not only limited to the principles of writing. There are also cases wherein students will be required to do research work about a particular domain of study. For example, you will be presented with a particular event in the history which can be expanded into some more info related to datelines, people and places. What you can do is to look for alternative materials from various resources and take note of the important details. You may use a book a journal and even internet resources.

Another type of a history coursework involves the creation of items related to a special event in history. There are teachers who instruct students to create a mini replica of a particular situation in the past by using some available materials. Or, it is also possible to create things related to history which can be done by building them using manual work.

One more coursework in history is writing dissertations. The proposals for dissertations can definitely be used to evaluate your skills in constructing new info out of the already established concepts. It is true that it can be very hard to construct a thesis statement in the filed of History since all events are exact. However, you may present some proposals in identifying what factors caused previous events to happen. In most cases, it would be worthwhile to read a piece of work other than the actual concept which is widely accepted in history.

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GCSE history Coursework on Kenya Essay

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Why did Kenyans want independence? There is one main reason why Kenya wanted independence and this is because of the land ownership ban on growing coffee in 1910. This act gave many leaders a reason for their campaigns. Because of this act, problems began to happen, working conditions like Kenyans wages and work placements. Kenyans were so angry of this because farmers who used to grow coffee, the profit they made out of the coffee are what they used to feed their family. The fact that the British took this away from them by banning the grow of it, this made Kenyans so angry because not only did the British think about themselves only, they were being selfish by taking away there main source of trade. Also Kenyans wanted independence because the British cut each Kenyans wage from 10 shillings, which was already low, to an even lower 7 shillings. All this selfishness and greedy behaviour made Kenyans want to fight for independence, and then what do the British do? They introduce a kipande which was like an I.D that each working Kenyan or any Kenyan who�s over 16 had to carry wherever they went. White settlers that lived in Kenya didn�t need to carry a kipande. If a policeman asked a Kenyan for his kipande and the Kenyan didn�t show it then the Kenyan would be in trouble. It was like discrimination because white settlers didn�t need one. The same year the kipande was introduced a man named Harry Thuku introduced an association called the young Kikuyu association. Thuku introduced this in the right time, because this is when Kenyans were most angry, due to lower wages, farming disruption, ban of coffee, and that Kenyans were feeling that they were being discriminated. When Thuku opened YKA, all the angry Kenyans would definitely support this. This means that Thuku would be supported. So Thuku begins to build schools so that the young Kenyans will be educated. And he knows that the skill s to speak and understand means that they will be able to use all the evidence the British have done to fight for it. Also something that made Kenyans angry is the building of the east African railway which was known as the �Iron Snake�, because a snake is supposed to be long and if it is disturbed it will attack. Kenyans absolutely disapproved of this because it was in their land and they used Indians workers to build it. Also it attracted white settlers to come in to Kenya and that Kenyans did not want at all. Another thing is that wages were low for Kenyans and the British paid wages to the Indians. The Kenyans had to move to cities to find jobs. Kenyans were so angry because the British did what it wanted on Kenya�s land at any time. It gave white settlers living in Kenya what they wanted also after the war (world war II) in 1945 Kenyans who had fought during the war returned, they were not satisfied with the return to substandard condition in Kenya. These soldiers were simply did not understand why the British subjected the Kenyans to this unethical manner! Which again contributed to the desire for independence. As the Kenyans soldiers had experience in the war therefore they knew how to fight and they also learnt strength and weaknesses of the British. Also they saw the white man being destroyed in the war (Germany- who were white got beaten in world war II). So this gave them confidence that Britain can be beaten. This influenced them to even more determination to fight for there independence. Also Kenyans soldiers were also familiar with the Atlantic charter that Roosevelt and Churchill had signed during the war. It stated that occupants in the country had the right to vote for the country�s government. The British and the French had broken the rules of the charter. But they had an excuse, which was that a colony wasn�t part of the charter. Kenya also knew that the two superpowers, USA and USSR didn�t at all have a colony. So as they didn�t support colonisation imperialism then they wont� support Britain. Kenya has seen a colony get independence by fighting for it, and Kenya know that if they fight for what they want they will also get it. What methods did Kenyans adopt in their approach to gaining independence? There many ways in which Kenyans tried to find independence. They tried many methods in order to gain independence for themselves. There are many reasons why Kenyans needed methods for independence, one of the reasons is that while Harry Thuku and all the other peaceful, non violent campaigns were going on, there were other Kenyan groups for example the Mau Mau (out out) who were a group of nationalists founded in 1952. They used violent protests mainly to intimidate the British. They scared and intimidated settlers and Africans they called collaborate. They set up a brutal campaign of suppression. Some examples of what they did are: � They slaughtered a young boy whilst sleeping � They mutilated a home guard of a white family horribly, (his skull was cut into 2 pieces, his hands and feet were cut off up to his wrist and ankle). � Some children were sliced to pieces � Pregnant women had their bellies sliced open This is how impatient some Kenyans were. They even acted like savages just for independence. My point of view is that this behaviour is appalling and horrible, and shouldn�t have been carried out in the first place. But on the other hand this just shows how impatient these Kenyans were. Another method that Kenyans approached to gain independence was to create associations, to attract members to apply and therefore there will be pressure against the British. And that is what a Kenyan nationalist named Harry Thuku did. Thuku set up the YKA (Young Kikuyu Association) in 1922, which encouraged nationalism and showed his fellow Kenyans were being discriminated in many situations. One example of discrimination is the Kipande, which was like an ID that every Kenyan and African had to carry. Another is the lowering of wages, which was already 10 shillings, and then it got cut to 7 shillings. Jomo Kenyatta set up the KAU. He went on strikes and protests and put a serious amount of pressure on the British and them feel nervous, he believed, by putting pressure on the British then it would force them to give up Kenya and leave it for the Kenyans. Jomo Kenyatta signed the UN, which helped them because it included the USA, and Russia who were totally against colonisation, because USA was once a colony and Russia were afraid of the feeling of being ruled. This put a lot of pressure on the British. The British Empire was falling apart and this time they had no USA to help them because they disapproved of colonisation. Kenyatta saw how Indians had gained their independence and was inspired by this and set up all the campaigns that the Indians used such as Non-violent campaigns, peaceful protests and having talks with the British to try and win his way round them, because they were very poor and extremely weak by now. The Kikuyu schools and their own Christian churches to become more intelligent and more religious. (Education helped the Kenyans to understand what was going on and began to understand Kenyatta�s views and actions towards the British. The religion made them more religious and to show the British that they could handle things on there own without the help of the British. Kenya finally did get its independence and from my point of view I believe that Kenya did not gain its independence by one man but by the cooperation of the whole nation. Even the Mau Mau who where known as the savages had a part in Kenya�s independence. Why did the Mau

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GCSE History Sites, Links, Educational Resources - Revision Aid

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