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Marie and Pierre Curie

Unable to continue her studies in Poland because universities did not admit women, Maria Sklodowska Curie traveled to Paris in 1891 to attend the Sorbonne .

Known by the French "Marie," she spent every spare hour reading in the library or in the laboratory. The industrious student caught the eye of Pierre Curie. director one of the laboratories where Marie worked.

Curie ardently wooed Marie and made several marriage proposals. They were finally married in 1895 and began their famous partnership. In 1898 they discovered polonium and radium. The Curies and scientist Henri Becquerel won a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903 for discovering radioactivity .

When Curie died in 1904, Marie pledged to carry on their work. She took his place at the Sorbonne, becoming the school's first female teacher. In 1911 she became the first person to win a second Nobel Prize, this time for chemistry. She continued to experiment and lecture until her death of leukemia in 1934, driven by the memory of the man she loved.

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Marie Curie Middle School 158

Marie Curie Middle School 158

Marie Curie Middle School 158 (MS 158 for short) is a middle school for science and technology located in Bayside, New York with a large enrollment. Approximately 1,150 6th to 8th graders attend this school, which is named after Marie Curie. the renowned scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry .

This school continues the District 26 gifted and talented program, accepting children from the 5th grade magnet program at P.S. 188 Kingsbury School, P.S. 203 Oakland Gardens School, P.S. 41, and P.S. 31 Bayside School.

Former math teacher Marie Nappi became principal after Charles DeMeo retired on June 30, 2005.

The graduation ceremony of eighth graders was traditionally held at St. Francis Preparatory School. [ citation needed ] It is now held at Queens College.

Programs

MS 158 has a Beacon program, a city-run youth-service organization, and many different after school programs as well. A Saturday morning program offers tutoring and academic support.

There are specific gifted and talented classes as well as a magnet program in math, science and technology enrichment. A program for hearing impaired students and classes in computers, fine and performing arts and math/literacy skills are offered.

A separate SP program that begins in 7th grade is offered to high achievers not in the magnet program. The pace of instruction in core academics is faster and Regents earth science and Math Regents is taught in the 8th grade. Admission to these classes is based upon 6th grade test scores and class performance as well as teacher recommendations. The school's theme this year is "believe in yourself" for the 2011-2012 school year. There is a new theme every year.

Community

Two community-based organizations are housed at the school. The Beacon Program is in its 12th year. This program services the community with many student and adult support programs. The program operates from 5pm to 10pm each day .

Trivia
  • The last 9th grade class graduated in 2006.
  • Struggling students can receive help through programs such as peer tutoring and the extended day program.
  • Additionally, the Mathcounts team placed first in the Queens Chapter in 2009.
  • Students can take a Spanish proficiency exam and two Regents examinations before high school. [1]
  • About 10 percent of the students are recent immigrants from China and South Korea. There are small ESL classes for language instruction.
  • An assistant principal and guidance counselor oversee each incoming class for its entire three-year stay.
  • 6th graders stay with the same teacher for three periods each day of instruction in reading, language arts, and social studies instead of moving from class to class.
  • "Up" and "down" staircases keep students moving during changes of classes.
  • Offers gym classes to 8th grade SP and Magnet classes as of 2009, but for only one day of the week.
Categories:
  • Middle schools in New York
  • Schools in Queens

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010 .

Marie Curie Middle School 158: Wikis (The Full Wiki)

Marie Curie Middle School 158: Wikis

Marie Curie Middle School 158 (MS 158 for short) is a middle school for science and technology located in Bayside, New York with a large enrollment. Approximately 1,150 6th to 8th graders attend this school, which is named after Marie Curie. the renowned scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry .

This school continues the District 26 gifted and talented program, accepting children from the 5th grade magnet program at P.S. 188 Kingsbury School, P.S. 203 Oakland Gardens School, P.S. 41, and P.S. 31 Bayside School.

Former math teacher Marie Nappi became principal after Charles DeMeo retired on June 30, 2005.

The graduation ceremony of eighth graders was traditionally held at St. Francis Preparatory School. [citation needed ] It is now held at St. John's University .

Contents Extracurriculars

Activities include basketball (girls and boys teams), volleyball, softball, newspaper club, peer tutoring, yearbook club, dance, chorus, orchestra, All Star Jazz Ensemble, peer mediation club, recycling and other clubs and organizations. The school also provides a National Junior Honor Society which allows students to do community service for the school. 7th grade students need 15 hours to be submitted into the society and 40 hours for continuing 8th grade members.

Programs

MS 158 has a Beacon program, a city-run youth-service organization, and many different after school programs as well. A Saturday morning program offers tutoring and academic support.

There are specific gifted and talented classes as well as a magnet program in math, science and technology enrichment. A program for hearing impaired students and classes in computers, fine and performing arts and math/literacy skills are offered.

A separate SP program that begins in 7th grade is offered to high achievers not in the magnet program. The pace of instruction in core academics is faster and Regents earth science is taught in the 8th grade. Admission to these classes is based upon 6th grade test scores and class performance as well as teacher recommendations.

Community

Two community-based organizations are housed at the school. The Beacon Program is in its 12th year. This program services the community with many student and adult support programs. The program operates from 5pm to 10pm each day .

Trivia
  • The last 9th grade class graduated in 2006.
  • Struggling students can receive help through programs such as peer tutoring and the extended day program.
  • Additionally, the Mathcounts team placed first in the Queens Chapter in 2009.
  • Students can take a Spanish proficiency exam and two Regents examinations before high school. [1]
  • About 10 percent of the students are recent immigrants from China and South Korea. There are small ESL classes for language instruction.
  • An assistant principal and guidance counselor oversee each incoming class for its entire three-year stay.
  • 6th graders stay with the same teacher for three periods each day of instruction in reading, language arts, and social studies instead of moving from class to class.
  • "Up" and "down" staircases keep students moving during changes of classes.
  • Offers gym classes to 8th grade SP and Magnet classes as of 2009, but for only one day of the week.
External links

The MiddleSchool158 Q mission statement for the 2004-2005 school year is as follows: To provide a nurturing, cognitive and social growth environment for all students at MarieCurieMiddleSchool in collaboration with all staff members, families and the community, so that students are prepared to enter society as knowledgeable and caring persons.

To bring students into the 21st century by reflecting real world practices in daily activities in school .


http://ms158.atspace.org ">MS 158 - Marie Curie Middle School (Previous Site) - MS 158 - Marie Curie Middle School

Classes for high achievers, a program for hearing-impaired students, and a substantial population of kids still learning to speak English are all part of the mix at MS 158. a large middleschool in Bayside.

Marie Nappi, a former math teacher at the school. became principal after Charles DeMeo retired in June 2005.

Though overseen by a separate, off-site administration, the District 75 students are treated as members of the school community, with full access to the facilities and participation in school events.


http://insideschools.org/index12.php?fso=756 ">Insideschools.org School Profile - M.S. 158 Marie Curie School School Review

Marie Curie -� Kids Encyclopedia

Marie Curie

(1867–1934). Polish-born French physicist Marie Curie was famous for her work on radioactivity and twice a winner of the Nobel Prize. With Henri Becquerel and her husband, Pierre Curie. she was awarded the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics. She was the sole winner of the 1911 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Marie Curie was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and she is the only woman to win the award in two different fields.


Maria Sklodowska (Marie Curie; standing) and her sister Bronislawa Sklodowska, 1886.
© Photos.com/Jupiterimages

Maria Salomea Sklodowska was born on November 7, 1867, in Warsaw, in what was then the Congress Kingdom of Poland, Russian Empire. From childhood she was remarkable for her prodigious memory, and at the age of 16 she won a gold medal on completion of her secondary education at the Russian lycée. Because her father, a teacher of mathematics and physics, lost his savings through bad investment, she had to take work as a teacher and at the same time took part clandestinely in the nationalist “free university,” reading in Polish to women workers. At the age of 18 she took a post as a governess, where she suffered an unhappy love affair. However, from her earnings she was able to finance her sister Bronislawa's medical studies in Paris, France, with the understanding that Bronislawa would in turn later help her to get an education.

In 1891 Sklodowska went to Paris and—now using the name Marie—began to follow the lectures of Paul Appel, Gabriel Lippmann, and Edmond Bouty at the Sorbonne university. Sklodowska worked far into the night and completed degrees in physics and math. It was in the spring of 1891 that she met Pierre Curie.

Their marriage (July 25, 1895) marked the start of a partnership that was soon to achieve results of world significance, in particular the discovery of polonium (so called by Marie in honor of her native land) in the summer of 1898 and that of radium a few months later. Following Henri Becquerel's discovery (1896) of a new phenomenon (which she later called “radioactivity”), Marie Curie, looking for a subject for a thesis, decided to find out if the property discovered in uranium was to be found in other matter. She discovered that this was true for thorium at the same time as Gerhard Carl Schmidt did.

Turning her attention to minerals, she found her interest drawn to pitchblende. Pitchblende, a mineral whose activity is superior to that of pure uranium, could be explained only by the presence in the ore of small quantities of an unknown substance of very high activity. Pierre Curie then joined Marie in the work that she had undertaken to resolve this problem and that led to the discovery of the new elements, polonium and radium. While Pierre Curie devoted himself chiefly to the physical study of the new radiations, Marie Curie struggled to obtain pure radium in the metallic state—achieved with the help of the chemist André-Louis Debierne, one of Pierre Curie's pupils. On the results of this research, Marie Curie received her doctorate of science in June 1903 and—with Pierre—was awarded the Davy Medal of the Royal Society. Also in 1903 they shared with Becquerel the Nobel Prize for Physics for the discovery of radioactivity.


Marie Curie posing with her daughters, Ève (left) and Irène (right).
© Photos.com/Jupiterimages

The birth of her two daughters, Irène and Ève, in 1897 and 1904 did not interrupt Marie's intensive scientific work. She was appointed lecturer in physics (1900) at the École Normale Supérieure for girls in Sèvres, France, and introduced there a method of teaching based on experimental demonstrations. In December 1904 she was appointed chief assistant in the laboratory directed by Pierre Curie.

The sudden death of Pierre Curie (April 19, 1906) was a bitter blow to Marie Curie, but it was also a decisive turning point in her career: henceforth she was to devote all her energy to completing alone the scientific work that they had undertaken. On May 13, 1906, she was appointed to the professorship that had been left vacant on her husband's death; she was the first woman to teach in the Sorbonne. In 1908 she became titular professor, and in 1910 her fundamental treatise on radioactivity was published. In 1911 she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, for the isolation of pure radium. In 1914 she saw the completion of the building of the laboratories of the Radium Institute (Institut du Radium) at the University of Paris.

Throughout World War I, Marie Curie, with the help of her daughter Irène, devoted herself to the development of the use of X-radiography. In 1918 the Radium Institute, the staff of which Irène had joined, began to operate in earnest, and it was to become a universal center for nuclear physics and chemistry. Marie Curie, now at the highest point of her fame and, from 1922, a member of the Academy of Medicine, devoted her researches to the study of the chemistry of radioactive substances and the medical applications of these substances.

In 1921, accompanied by her two daughters, Marie Curie made a triumphant journey to the United States, where President Warren G. Harding presented her with a gram of radium that had been bought as the result of a collection among American women. Curie gave lectures, especially in Belgium, Brazil, Spain, and Czechoslovakia. She was made a member of the International Commission on Intellectual Co-operation by the Council of the League of Nations. In addition, she had the satisfaction of seeing the development of the Curie Foundation in Paris and in Poland the inauguration in 1932 in Warsaw of the Radium Institute, of which her sister Bronislawa became director.

One of Marie Curie's outstanding achievements was to have understood the need to accumulate intense radioactive sources, not only to treat illness but also to maintain an abundant supply for research in nuclear physics; the resultant stockpile was an unrivaled instrument until the appearance after 1930 of particle accelerators. The existence in Paris at the Radium Institute of a stock of 1.5 grams of radium in which, over a period of several years, radium D and polonium had accumulated made a decisive contribution to the success of the experiments undertaken in the years around 1930—in particular of those experiments performed by Irène Curie in conjunction with Frédéric Joliot, whom she had married in 1926. This work prepared the way for the discovery of the neutron by Sir James Chadwick and, above all, for the discovery in 1934 by Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie of artificial radioactivity. A few months after this discovery, Marie Curie died as a result of leukemia caused by the action of radiation. Her contribution to physics had been immense, not only in her own work, the importance of which had been demonstrated by the award to her of two Nobel Prizes, but because of her influence on subsequent generations of nuclear physicists and chemists. Marie Curie, together with Irène Joliot-Curie. wrote the entry on radium for the 13th edition (1926) of the Encyclopædia Britannica.

Marie Curie died on July 4, 1934, near Sallanches, France. In 1995 her ashes were enshrined in the Panthéon in Paris; she was the first woman to receive this honor for her own achievements. Her office and laboratory in the Curie Pavilion of the Radium Institute are preserved as the Curie Museum.

FREE Marie Curie Essay

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Marie Curie enormously contributed to the fields of chemistry and physics despite social barriers towards women scientists. Marie Curie was a true scientific pioneer, and one of the first scientists to investigate radioactivity. She was the first scientist to recognize that radioactivity is the result of changes in the atoms of an element. She also discovered that radioactive elements radium and polonium exist only in microscopic quantities in nature. She also defined the basic unit of measurement for radioactivity-the curie-and prepared a standard sample of radium by which all other samples were measured. Her work helped open the field of atomic physics for study and because of her research and achievements she was awarded two Nobel prizes. She received one in physics in 1903 and one in chemistry in 1911. Today only three people, including Marie Curie, have achieved this distinction.

She was born in Warsaw, Poland, and her father was a physics and mathematics professor at one of Warsaw's gymnasiums, which are schools similar to American high schools. Marie had to overcome the Russian oppression of Poland, her family's poverty, and her oldest sister and her mother's death from tuberculosis. But despite the hardships of her life in Poland, Marie excelled in her studies at the gymnasium and was driven by her desire for a university education.

She began her scientific career as a student at the University of Paris (also known as Sorbonne) in 1891, when women scientists were virtually nonexistent. Women were not encouraged to study science, and were often actively discouraged from studying it by universities and society. Nevertheless, Marie followed her dream of doing scientific research, and she succeeded in gaining her Sorbonne degree. In the summer of 1883 she took the exam for her physical sciences degree and passed at the top of her class. Later that year, she returned to the Sorbonne to study for a license in mat

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WikiGrain: Marie Curie Middle School 158

Marie Curie Middle School 158 (MS 158 for short) is a middle school for science and technology located in Bayside, New York with a large enrollment. Approximately 1,150 6th to 8th graders attend this school, which is named after Marie Curie. the renowned scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry .

This school continues the District 26 gifted and talented program, accepting children from the 5th grade magnet program at P.S. 188 Kingsbury School, P.S. 203 Oakland Gardens School, P.S. 41, and P.S. 31 Bayside School.

Former math teacher Marie Nappi became principal after Charles DeMeo retired on June 30, 2005.

Programs

MS 158 has a Beacon program, a city-run youth-service organization, and many different after school programs as well. A Saturday morning program offers tutoring and academic support.

There are specific gifted and talented classes as well as a magnet program in math, science and technology enrichment. A program for hearing impaired students and classes in computers, fine and performing arts and math/literacy skills are offered.

A separate SP program that begins in 7th grade is offered to high achievers not in the magnet program. The pace of instruction in core academics is faster and Regents earth science and Math Regents is taught in the 8th grade. Admission to these classes is based upon 6th grade test scores and class performance as well as teacher recommendations. The school's theme this year is "believe in yourself" for the 2011-2012 school year. There is a new theme every year.

Community

Two community-based organizations are housed at the school. The Beacon Program is in its 12th year. This program services the community with many student and adult support programs. The program operates from 5pm to 10pm each day.

Trivia
  • The last 9th grade class graduated in 2006.
  • Struggling students can receive help through programs such as peer tutoring and the extended day program.
  • Additionally, the Mathcounts team placed first in the Queens Chapter in 2009.
  • Students can take a Spanish proficiency exam and two Regents examinations before high school. [1]
  • About 10 percent of the students are recent immigrants from China and South Korea. There are small ESL classes for language instruction.
  • An assistant principal and guidance counselor oversee each incoming class for its entire three-year stay.
  • 6th graders stay with the same teacher for three periods each day of instruction in reading, language arts, and social studies instead of moving from class to class.
  • "Up" and "down" staircases keep students moving during changes of classes.
  • Offers gym classes to 8th grade SP and Magnet classes as of 2009, but for only one day of the week.
  • Offers one magnet class and four SP classes
  • Motto changes each year

Marie Curie - Uncyclopedia

Marie Curie

Marie Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a French (originally Polish ) scientist. Nobel Laureate and housewife. Though her contribution has been grossly overstated, Curie is universally recognised as being the only woman ever to make a significant contribution to science (or any other field of any importance).

Curie, pictured, enjoyed dressing as an extra from a haunted house movie.

Contents Early Life

Marie was born a female and, as such, from an early age showed little interest and less ability in the fields of science and technology. The reason for this is that, being a girl. young Marie did not possess a Y-chromosome, which is the location of the so-called 'science gene ' – the gene responsible for scientific ability. She did, however, display an uncommon talent for playing with dolls.

Unfortunately for her, she was required to study science at school. Marie soon learned that she could cheat her way through science exams and homework by performing sexual favours. which ranged from holding hands (in elementary school ) to unspeakable depravity (in high school ). Her real talent, it has emerged from her memoirs, was for cookery (euphemistically called Domestic Science) and drawing pretty pictures of bunnies (also known as Art & Design).

University

While at university, Marie attempted to earn money by forging banknotes. However, she was easily caught as she insisted, despite the advice of her friends, on including her face on the notes.

Due to her dishonesty, she gained a reputation for scientific ability, with the result that she was offered a scholarship at the University of Paris. Her parents, seizing the opportunity to have a successful child (her older brother had embarrassed her family by opening an opium den ), encouraged her to accept, which she did. She studied under (quite literally ) the well-respected Professor Jacques Fontaine.

While at university, Marie relied almost exclusively on a gifted young student named Pierre Curie to complete her assignments and to help her cheat in examinations. One fateful day, Pierre delivered an ultimatum to Marie in a brief letter:

Look, either marry me, or I'll tell everyone that you're a fraud. I've been doing your assignments for three years now and I've never got so much as a peck on the cheek, yet you've been with practically everyone on campus .

Within a week the pair were married and, after 'finishing' her degree, Curie turned to her true calling as a housewife. They moved into an apartment in Paris.

Discovery

One day, approximately two years into their marriage, Marie was rooting through their attic for an ironing board cover. She came across a box marked Samples and her curiosity drove her to explore it further. Turning out the contents onto the attic floor, she looked at the assorted objects with a wide-eyed wonder not unlike that of a child at a fireworks display.

One object in particular caught her eye and she took it to Pierre to ask him what it was. He was unsure and took it away for further testing. It turned out to be an entirely new element, which Pierre named radium after the way Marie used to mispronounce 'radiation ' at university [1]

Partly as a joke and partly in recognition of her noticing the sample and making him quiche while he was working, Pierre decided to include Marie's name on the report when he published his findings to the world. This was immediately seized upon by the press because it was as unusual then as it is now for a woman to contribute to human knowledge.

Nobel Prize

This worldwide media coverage caught the attention of the Nobel Committee who, in what is widely regarded as the first act of tokenism, decided to award her the Nobel Prize for Physics. Due to a mix-up, there was not enough room to accommodate all of the prize winners (Curie insisted upon bringing a large entourage with her) and so, to save space, the Nobel Committee decided to also award her the prize for Chemistry. making her the only person ever to win two Nobel Prizes.

At the ceremony, Curie made a rather confusing and rambling speech. Below is an extract:

". so we invented radium, anyway, and like, we don't think its very radiumactive. That means that the radium doesn't admit a lot of radium, you know, alpha radium and beta radium and gamma radium don't really come out of radium. But, like, I dunno. We might be wrong."

Business

Curie, pictured with a group of real scientists. Note how they are humouring her quaint ideas while attempting to surreptitiously grasp her breasts .

Following her Nobel Prize success, the Curies began frantically promoting radium as a panacea for all ills. Madame Curie's Radium Miracle Medicine was marketed as ”a tonic for cancer. heart disease, impotence. demonic possession, radiation sickness and general illness.” Having patented the chemical formula for radium, the pair also made large sums of money by suing rich businessmen who were found to have traces of radium or radon (a derivative product) in their products or factories.

Unbeknownst to the couple, the object responsible for their success was also to be responsible for their downfall. In a cruelly ironic twist, radium turned out to be dangerously radioactive and ultimately proved fatal for Marie and Pierre. The couple had taken to having daily radium baths and radium soup [2] for a starter with every meal. As a result of this, their health deteriorated rapidly and caused their eventual deaths from radiation poisoning. The autopsy report described them as being ”more cancer than human”.

Tributes

With the rise of the feminist movement in the 1960s, Curie's contribution to science has repeatedly been the subject of revisionism, with the result that she is now credited with discovering 90% of the elements on the periodic table. including Einsteinium, which is named after her pet lizard.

She is simultaneously regarded as a French and Polish hero (and, oddly, a Fijian hero as well). She was recently named as the greatest Pole ever to live (though it is suggested that this has more due to the paucity of Polish war heroes than anything else).

References
  1. ^   For this reason, her professor used to make her give presentations about nuclear physics in public and then laugh when she talked about ”alpha radium.”
  2. ^   Still quite a delicacy in places.

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