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Ideal Society Essay, Research Paper

Creating Our Ideal Society

The perfect society does not exist. If it did however, it would probably sound much like the vacation brochures you can read at your travel agency. The air and water would be clean. You could have a perfect view of anything you wanted. Also, the weather would be perfect for any activity you wanted to do. This Utopia does not physically exist, but in our minds, it goes something like this.

The air is always fresh and clean, free of any toxins. The climate would be perfect for any activity you wanted to do at any particular day. If you wanted to go, skiing you could go the mountains in the north where the temperature is just cold enough for snow to fall. However, if you wanted to be a beach bum the next day you could go south to the sandy beaches. The ocean water would be crystal clear and always warm. You could lie in the sun all day with no worry of skin cancer. The people on the beaches also do not worry about what may wash up on the beach because pollution is not defined in their society.

In our society, every person is treated as an equal. No one person would think or act as if they were better than someone else was. There would be no racism present, all types of people would reside here and get along together. It would not matter if you were African, Caucasian or any color of the rainbow everyone is treated the same. People would not judge each other by their appearance or whom they interacted with.

In addition, there also would be a diverse amount of different religions that would coincide with each other in our ideal society. Today religion is one of the most controversial topics in society. There are countless numbers of active religions coinciding with and contradicting each other. Today when each person believes that his or her choice of religion is the correct one conflict is inevitable. Through the years, people have been discouraged from exhibiting their religious beliefs in social situations. In public places today, such as school, religion is prohibited in order to avoid conflict. In our ideal society, religion would still play an important role but only as important as each person wanted. Religion would not be pushed on to anyone and yet offered to anyone wanting it. Every religion would be equally respected and effort made by all citizens to understand all religions thoroughly.

This great society s government would be a lot like the government More, wrote about in Utopia. It would be divided up into small communities. These small communities would have two appointed head officials that would meet with other head officials once a month to discuss the laws and business of that month. The head officials are appointed not elected. There would be no need for elections, because elections in most societies today are useless. Elections are more mud slinging than facts and would be a thing of the past. Another reason for no elections is that everyone would get a chance to be a head official. In our perfect society it would not matter your race or gender because everyone would get a chance to hold a high office.

In addition to our government, our economic system would be much different from any economic system today. There would be no such thing as money. The reason for no money is so that no one person would feel inadequate to any other person that had more money than they did. In our society, there are two types of goods, free goods and consumer goods. According to the web site for Intelligent Systems and Their Societies, free goods are goods that renew themselves and should be given out with out anything in return. This would mean food would be a free good. No one would have to go hungry in our perfect society. However, say you wanted something that did not renew itself and you had not the means to make it, this is where consumer goods would come into effect. The individual who wanted the item would find someone who could make that particular item. Then they would negotiate a trade. Like More, in his book Utopia, we believe each individual would be taught a special trade of their own (632). This would mean everyone would work! There would be no special treatment for example government assistance for those would decide to stay at home to watch Jerry Springer, and have twelve children. If you did not work or go to school than you could not receive and free goods. In addition, everyone would receive free health care and an education. Education is the key to many problems that we face in our society today, like welfare, drug abuse, and violence.

In contrast to everyone being able to live happy and peacefully together with everyone else, those individuals who decided to commit horrible crimes would be dealt with harshly. The people of this society would have no tolerance for those who wanted to rape, murder, harm or steal. The old eye for an eye policy would go back into effect. If you stole form someone, you would have something taken away from you. You would also have to publicity apologize to the one who you stole from. If you committed a more serious crime like rape or murder, you would be dealt with immediately. In our society, the court systems will work much faster. Today many cases do not go to trial for at least six months. Then if it is a harsh crime, the punishment does not always fit the crime. In our society today some people get off easier for murder than they do for speeding. There are many inmates today who have been on death role for twenty years, for committing such crimes as raping and murdering children. For example, according to the web site for the Tennessean, Robert Glen Coe was just executed for raping and killing a six year old little girl that died in 1979. He has been on death row for twenty years. Those individuals in our ideal society who acted in this manner would not be aloud to live for more than one year after their trial. With juveniles, the punishment would not be as harsh as with adults. The juveniles would have to do a lot of community service work. We also think that with juveniles public humiliation is a good form of punishment. They would have to wear signs saying what they did wrong. One of the reasons we think this type of punishment is good for young people is because young people are so afraid of public opinion of themselves to do anything wrong very often.

How important is our society to us? It is very important. Our society may not be right for you but it is right for us. No one could live without some form of a society. We all need the knowledge accumulated by the society in which we live. The most important things should not be how many material things that can be produced from this knowledge, but it should be using the knowledge and experience of the past to help us peacefully coincide together today.

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Ideal Society Essay Research Paper Creating Our

Ideal Society Essay Research Paper Creating Our

Ideal Society Essay, Research Paper

Creating Our Ideal Society

The perfect society does not exist. If it did however, it would probably sound much like the vacation brochures you can read at your travel agency. The air and water would be clean. You could have a perfect view of anything you wanted. Also, the weather would be perfect for any activity you wanted to do. This Utopia does not physically exist, but in our minds, it goes something like this.

The air is always fresh and clean, free of any toxins. The climate would be perfect for any activity you wanted to do at any particular day. If you wanted to go, skiing you could go the mountains in the north where the temperature is just cold enough for snow to fall. However, if you wanted to be a beach bum the next day you could go south to the sandy beaches. The ocean water would be crystal clear and always warm. You could lie in the sun all day with no worry of skin cancer. The people on the beaches also do not worry about what may wash up on the beach because pollution is not defined in their society.

In our society, every person is treated as an equal. No one person would think or act as if they were better than someone else was. There would be no racism present, all types of people would reside here and get along together. It would not matter if you were African, Caucasian or any color of the rainbow everyone is treated the same. People would not judge each other by their appearance or whom they interacted with.

In addition, there also would be a diverse amount of different religions that would coincide with each other in our ideal society. Today religion is one of the most controversial topics in society. There are countless numbers of active religions coinciding with and contradicting each other. Today when each person believes that his or her choice of religion is the correct one conflict is inevitable. Through the years, people have been discouraged from exhibiting their religious beliefs in social situations. In public places today, such as school, religion is prohibited in order to avoid conflict. In our ideal society, religion would still play an important role but only as important as each person wanted. Religion would not be pushed on to anyone and yet offered to anyone wanting it. Every religion would be equally respected and effort made by all citizens to understand all religions thoroughly.

This great society s government would be a lot like the government More, wrote about in Utopia. It would be divided up into small communities. These small communities would have two appointed head officials that would meet with other head officials once a month to discuss the laws and business of that month. The head officials are appointed not elected. There would be no need for elections, because elections in most societies today are useless. Elections are more mud slinging than facts and would be a thing of the past. Another reason for no elections is that everyone would get a chance to be a head official. In our perfect society it would not matter your race or gender because everyone would get a chance to hold a high office.

In addition to our government, our economic system would be much different from any economic system today. There would be no such thing as money. The reason for no money is so that no one person would feel inadequate to any other person that had more

money than they did. In our society, there are two types of goods, free goods and consumer goods. According to the web site for Intelligent Systems and Their Societies, free goods are goods that renew themselves and should be given out with out anything in return. This would mean food would be a free good. No one would have to go hungry in our perfect society. However, say you wanted something that did not renew itself and you had not the means to make it, this is where consumer goods would come into effect. The individual who wanted the item would find someone who could make that particular item. Then they would negotiate a trade. Like More, in his book Utopia, we believe each individual would be taught a special trade of their own (632). This would mean everyone would work! There would be no special treatment for example government assistance for those would decide to stay at home to watch Jerry Springer, and have twelve children. If you did not work or go to school than you could not receive and free goods. In addition, everyone would receive free health care and an education. Education is the key to many problems that we face in our society today, like welfare, drug abuse, and violence.

In contrast to everyone being able to live happy and peacefully together with everyone else, those individuals who decided to commit horrible crimes would be dealt with harshly. The people of this society would have no tolerance for those who wanted to rape, murder, harm or steal. The old eye for an eye policy would go back into effect. If you stole form someone, you would have something taken away from you. You would also have to publicity apologize to the one who you stole from. If you committed a more serious crime like rape or murder, you would be dealt with immediately. In our society, the court systems will work much faster. Today many cases do not go to trial for at least six months. Then if it is a harsh crime, the punishment does not always fit the crime. In our society today some people get off easier for murder than they do for speeding. There are many inmates today who have been on death role for twenty years, for committing such crimes as raping and murdering children. For example, according to the web site for the Tennessean, Robert Glen Coe was just executed for raping and killing a six year old little girl that died in 1979. He has been on death row for twenty years. Those individuals in our ideal society who acted in this manner would not be aloud to live for more than one year after their trial. With juveniles, the punishment would not be as harsh as with adults. The juveniles would have to do a lot of community service work. We also think that with juveniles public humiliation is a good form of punishment. They would have to wear signs saying what they did wrong. One of the reasons we think this type of punishment is good for young people is because young people are so afraid of public opinion of themselves to do anything wrong very often.

How important is our society to us? It is very important. Our society may not be right for you but it is right for us. No one could live without some form of a society. We all need the knowledge accumulated by the society in which we live. The most important things should not be how many material things that can be produced from this knowledge, but it should be using the knowledge and experience of the past to help us peacefully coincide together today.

FREE An Ideal Society Essay

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Throughout history, mankind has strived to create a society in which the needs of all who live within it are met. Many different creative thinkers have pondered upon the idea of an ideal society. Thomas More and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. have both expressed their own thoughts about what an ideal society might be. Government, free will and equality are all different variables of society that impact daily life. Individuals within a society possess different values and ideals; this, therefore, creates different views of what an ideal society is defined by. The ideals of each individual within a society must be upheld in order for an ideal society to exist. An ideal society is unattainable due to the subjective nature of humanity.

Free will is a property of human nature that depends solely on the individual. Every individual in a free society has the ability to make any decision that impacts his or her own life. This means that any one person can use their own free will to alter or hamper the ideals possessed by another individual within the society. This notion goes against the grains of the idea of an ideal society. An ideal society would have to provide the ideal conditions for all those who lived within it. The principles and standards of the inhabitants within the society would determine these ideal conditions. If an individual within this model society could alter the life of another individual within the society, the ideals of the second individual may be broken; this consequently undermines and destroys the concept of an absolute ideal society. Thomas More's Utopia carries the premise that everyone within the utopian society does what is necessary for the good of the society, and that one's free will would consist of only what is beneficial to the culture. This, in itself, is limiting free will by excluding the possibility of freely doing what is not beneficial to the culture. More

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Platos Ideal Society Essay, Research Paper Plato - s

Platos Ideal Society Essay, Research Paper

Plato’s Ideal Society

To fully understand the social and political thoughts of Plato, it is best to refer to The Republic, which was written by Plato. The book spells out the goal of society as well as a blueprint to follow to obtain this goal. In this book Plato describes a perfect society; one where everyone lives harmoniously and without the fear of violence or material possession. To understand this utopian community we must look at several areas of it separately. The first we will examine is the purpose of the community. Secondly we will look at the abolition of private property among the ruling class. Next to study is the abolition of the family system. Finally we will examine the opposition to Plato’s perfect society.

You may be asking yourself, “Do you really need a purpose for a perfect community?” The answer to your question is “Yes”. People have tried for centuries to make the “perfect” government; democracy, socialism, communist, monarchy, but all have failed to achieve perfection. In Plato’s utopian society, one would not worry about money, violence, or anyone trying to get ahead through devious ways and this is his purpose.

This is where governments have failed in the past. Plato holds that there is one natural force that has kept a perfect society from happening, and this is selfishness. People are often out to serve their own purpose and this is wrong. Plato believes that if this element is taken out of society then things will run much more smoothly. Plato is not the only philosopher to write on this subject. John Locke and Jean Juaque Russeau have also written about this many years later. John Locke believed that everyone is good by natural law. The opportunity for possessions is what hurts the society. They believed in a Social Contract in which everyone worked towards a common goal. They went so far as to say that there could be anarchy as long as everyone abides by the social contract and works towards a “general will.”

Plato advocates the abolishment of private property among the ruling class. Plato believes that there are differences between people at birth. Some are wiser, some stronger, and some that are better nurturers. The wisest of these people are best suited to be called rulers. Plato believes that they are guardians of society, and they consist of rulers, military leaders, and police. He

believes that they should have no personal property. “The overcoming of selfish interests is regarded as most necessary for those who are to have the charge of the welfare and governance of all other citizens, quite apart from the fact that they are best equipped to overcome them” (Okin p30). If this element of selfishness is driven out of the ruling class, this would turn their focus, from attaining property to what is more important; the well being of the state.

However, I do not agree with this part of Plato’s ideal society. I believe that only taking land from the ruling class is the wrong idea. I believe everyone should have all the land or none of the land. No person should own more than another. In the community Plato calls for, I believe a communal ownership, where everyone including the ruling class would lay claim to the same land, would be better than just taking land from the “Guardians.” Although Plato does not believe this is possible, I believe it is a crucial part of having a society where no one has selfish desires.

The next part of Plato’s perfect society we must look at is the abolition of the family system. Plato feels that

because some people are better nurturers, they are better suited to raise the children. In this society, you will not have children to call your own or a wife to come home to. This is because they are seen as possessions of the male figure. Everyone would live in a communal society, much like military barracks. Reproduction is done in a manner not usually seen. Once a year or so, men and women are matched up through a rigged lottery system. The chance of who you mate with is supposed to be random, however most would be matched up by looks and the task you are best suited for (i.e. If you are an attractive male farmer, you are best suited to reproduce with an attractive female farmer). This may seem like a very weird way of doing things, but taking the aspect of small family systems out of the community will lead to a large family where everyone feels accepted.

This is another area where I must disagree with Plato. I do believe that a wife and children can seem like possessions, but because there is no ownership of property, there would not be the element of pride we experience in society when dealing with offspring. I also feel that denying a man or women from the chance at love can be a

horrible mistake. It may seem like a mute point, love, in my opinion, helps to push our society along in today’s society, and if that element was removed, it would hurt his utopian community.

Looking at the state of today’s society, it is hard to believe that a goal such as Plato’s could really be accomplished; a society where everyone works together to achieve a common goal with no wants for personal gain. However, I feel that in the right setting, in a developing country, this plan for a utopian society can be accomplished. If people are taught from birth that personal gain is not what we should be interested, they will form the base of a society free of troubles.

An Ideal Society essays

An Ideal Society

The principles and standards of the inhabitants within the society would determine these ideal conditions. If an individual within this model society could alter the life of another individual within the society, the ideals of the second individual may be broken; this consequently undermines and destroys the concept of an absolute ideal society. Thomas More's Utopia carries the premise that everyone within the utopian society does what is necessary for the good of the society, and that one's free will would consist of only what is beneficial to the culture. This, in itself, is limiting free will by excluding the possibility of freely doing what is not beneficial to the culture. More said, the citizens, "(do) not waste their time in idleness or self-indulgence,aE but who's to say that they cannot Absolute free will gives each citizen the ability to do whatever they feel inclined to do, even perhaps, idle or self-indulge. In Dr. King's "I Have a DreamaE speech, the idea of free will throughout the society is not touched on; however, on the basis that freedom should be given to citizens of "color,aE freedom of will would most likely be included.

Government is another social issue that is in conflict with the id

Platos Ideal Society essay

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Todays Society Vs Ideal Society Sociology Essay

Реферат: SocialismThe Ideal Society Essay Research Paper CommunismThe

Socialism-The Ideal Society? Essay, Research Paper

Communism-The Ideal Society?

Society is flawed. There are critical imbalances in it that are causing much of humanity to suffer. In The Communist Manifesto Karl Marx is reacting to this fact by describing his vision of a perfectly balanced society, a communist society. Simply put, a communist society is one where all property is held in common. No one person has more than the other, but rather everyone shares in the fruits of their labors. Marx is writing of this society because, he believes it to be the best form of society possible. He believes that communism creates the correct balance between the needs of the individual, and the needs of society. He also believes that sometimes violence is necessary to reach the state of communism. This paper will reflect upon these two topics: the relationship of the individual and society, and the issue of violence, as each is portrayed in the manifesto.

Before embarking upon these topics, it is necessary to establish a baseline from which to view these ideas. It is important to realize that in everything, humans view things from their own cultural perspective, thereby possibly distorting or misinterpretinga work or idea. Marx speaks of this saying, “Your very ideas are but the outgrowth of the conditions of your bourgeois production and bourgeois property, just as your jurisprudence is but the will of your class made into a law for all, a will, whose essential character and direction are determined by the economical conditions of existence of your class” (Marx, p.71). With this in mind, some perspective on the society of that time is vital. During this time the industrial revolution is taking place, a massive movement away from small farms, businesses operated out of homes, small shops on the corner, and the like. Instead, machines are mass-producing products in giant factories, with underpaid workers. No longer do people need to have individual skills. Rather, it is only necessary that they can keep the machines going, and do small, repetitive work. The lower

working class can no longer eke out a tolerable existence in their own pursuits, but are lowered to working inhumane hours in these factories. This widens the rift between the upper and lower class called bourgeois and proletariat, respectively until they are essentially two different worlds. The bourgeois, a tiny portion of the population, has the majority of the wealth while

the proletariat, the huge majority, has nothing. It is with this background that Marx begins.

First, the topic of the individual and society will be discussed. This topic in itself can be broken down even further. First, the flaws with the “current” system in respect to the bourgeois and proletariat will be shown, thereby revealing the problems in the relationship between individual and society. Secondly, the way that communism addresses these issues, and the rights of the individual, as seen through the manifesto.

Quite clearly, Marx is concerned with the organization of society. He sees that the majority of society, that is, the proletariat, are existing in sub-human conditions. Marx also sees that the bourgeoisie has a disproportionate abundance of property and power, and that because of what they are, they abuse it. He writes of how the current situation with the bourgeoisie and proletariat developed. “The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles” (Marx, p.55). There have always been struggles between two classes, an upper and lower class. However, Marx speaks of the current order saying, “It [bourgeois] has but established new classes, new conditions of oppression, new forms of struggle in place of the old ones. Our epoch, the epoch of the bourgeoisie, possesses, however, this distinctive feature: it has simplified the class antagonisms. Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes directly facing each other: Bourgeoisie and Proletariat” (Marx, p.56). The very nature of the bourgeoisie causes it to grow in size and power while the proletariat shrinks,

therefore increasing the rift between the two. Marx goes on to describe how this situation came about, with the industrial revolution and other factors.

Modern industry has established the world-market, for which the discovery of America paved the way. This market has given an immense development to commerce, to navigation, to communication by land. This development has, in its turn, reacted on the extension of industry; and in proportion as industry, commerce, navigation, railways extended, in the same proportion the bourgeoisie developed, increased its capital, and pushed into the background every class handed down from the Middle Ages. We see, therefore, how the modern bourgeoisie is itself the product of a long course of development, of a series of revolutions in the modes of production and of exchange. (Heilbroner, p.56-57).

With these thoughts in mind, a more defined view of the individual classes can be attained. First, the proletariat: in several places Marx speaks of how the proletariat is oppressed. He speaks of past societies and the current society when he says, “Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed ” (Marx, p.55). Bourgeoisie and proletariat could quite comfortably be added to this list of oppressor and oppressed. In every way the proletariat is oppressed, with no hope of improving the lot they have been given, or of raising themselves up. Rather, they are forced to march on hopelessly, knowing that they will not be released from their labors till death. Marx also writes of the relationship between the proletariat and the machines, which is a result of the split between the bourgeoisie and proletariat. “He [proletariat] becomes an appendage of the machine, and it is only the most simply, most monotonous, and most easily acquired knack, that is required of him Not only are they slaves of the bourgeois class, and of the bourgeois State; they are daily and hourly enslaved by the machine, by the overlooker, and, above all, by the individual bourgeois manufacturer himself” (Marx, p.61-62). Marx draws a picture of how the majority of the population is in an oppressed situation of slavery. The lot of the proletariat is not to be envied. From here, Marx moves on to describe the oppressor, the bourgeois. He is quite eloquent in his portrayal of this class. The bourgeois, wherever it has got the upper hand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his natural superiors,’ and has left remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous cash payment.’ It has drowned the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervor, of chivalrous enthusiasm, of philistine sentimentalism, in the icy water of egotistical calculation. It has resolved personal worth into exchange value, and in place of the numberless indefeasible chartered freedoms, has set up that single, unconscionable freedom Free Trade. (Heilbroner, p. 57)

Here Marx is speaking of how the bourgeoisie controlled society takes every aspect of society and puts them in terms of an exchange value. They reduce all that is noble and admirable about humanity to monetary matters, all in the name of capitalism. Again, “All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned, and man is at last compelled to face with sober senses, his real

conditions of life, and his relations with his kind” (Marx, p.59). Marx uses very strong language in these passages, saying that the bourgeois profanes the holy’, and drowns the most heavenly ecstasies of religious fervor.’ The bourgeois removes the humanity from society, creating a system in which anything and everything is measured by its strict cash worth.

Now that the roles of the bourgeoisie and proletariat have been established, it is possible to reconsider the communist ideal. Clearly, Marx believes that it is wrong for the majority of society, the proletariat, to suffer so. He believes that individuals should be equal, not divided into two distinct worlds. Marx describes the current individual in society saying that “In bourgeois society capital is independent and has individuality, while the living person is dependent and has no individuality” (Marx, p.69). He also makes the distinguishing point that it is important for the reader to realize that objections they have more than likely rise up from their own bourgeoisie background. “You must, therefore, confess that by individual’ you mean no other person than the bourgeois, than the middle-class owner of property. This person must, indeed be swept out of the way, and made impossible” (Marx, p.70). Marx, and also communism, wants to correct society so that all individuals benefit without a particular ruling and enslaved class. Marx speaks for communism saying, “All that we want to do away with, is the miserable character of this appropriation, under which the labourer lives merely to increase capital, and is allowed to live only in so far as the interest of the ruling class requires it” (Marx, p.69). Marx declares if communism is implemented that “In proportion as the exploitation of one individual by another is put an end to, the exploitation of one nation by another will also be put an end to” (Marx, p.73).

With all of this established clearly Marx thinks it wrong that a small group of people should profit so much to the detriment of so many. Any society that encourages this, or allows this to develop is wrong, and should be changed. He believes that society is incorrect and corrupt to allow so many people to suffer. As a result he writes this manifesto that lays out the problems, and explains why he believes that communism will correct the balance of society and create an existence where every person is valued, and no one can raise themselves up by oppressing another. The next obvious question is how society is going to make the transition from the current capitalism to Marx’s communism. Clearly the ruling bourgeois are not going to wake up one day and realize that the whole basis of their society is cruel and corrupt and decide to redistribute their wealth. However, Marx believes that is inevitable that the proletariat will realize their situation and their power, and overturn the current society. “Its [bourgeois] fall and the victory of the proletariat are equally inevitable” (Marx, p.66). This notwithstanding, it will still be necessary for the proletariat to take things into their own hands and correct the current problems.

This brings up the topic of violence. As declared before, the bourgeois will not be readily willing to forfeit their position, so stronger measures will be necessary to create the change that is necessary. Marx has two things to say on this subject. First, violence in and of itself is not a good thing. Second, however, it may at times be necessary to achieve a greater good. First, let’s establish Marx’s position that violence in general should be avoided. Marx speaks of constant upheaval and violence in several places. ” oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary re-constitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes” (Marx, p.55). Constant opposition, or violence results in the destruction of both forces, according to Marx. Again, he says, “Constant revolutionizing of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones” (Marx, p.58). Quite clearly, constant upheaval and violence is not a good thing, but is detrimental to both the individual and society.

However, in order to institute communism, which is the greatest good according to Marx, a revolution is necessary. Revolution does not necessarily mean violence. However, in this case violence will be difficult to avoid, and Marx states that violence may be necessary. Marx wrote several passages regarding this. He declares that, “The proletariat, the lowest stratum of our present society, cannot stir, cannot raise itself up, without the whole superincumbent strata of official society being sprung into the air” (Marx, p.65). What is being described here is clearly nothing less than a revolution, a complete reversal in thought and society. Marx then describes the first step in this revolution. “We have seen above, that the first step in the revolution by the working class, is to raise the proletariat to the position of ruling class, to win the battle of democracy” (Marx, p.74). So it is clear that the first step is to raise the proletariat to the ruling class, but how is this done? Marx writes that ” we traced the more or less veiled civil war, raging within existing society, up to the point where that war breaks out into open revolution, and where the violent overthrow of the bourgeoisie lays the foundation for the sway of the proletariat” (Marx, p.66). He speaks directly of violence when he says that “If the proletariat during its contest with the bourgeoisie is compelled, by the force of circumstances, to organize itself as a class, if, by means of a revolution, it makes itself the ruling class, and, as such, sweeps away by force the old condition of production ” (Marx, p.75). If the proletariat is forced to violence, then violence should be taken, because it is for the greater good. Marx puts it all together in one final statement. “In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.” (Marx,p.86).

Putting things back into perspective again, it is vital to realize that this violence should be short lived, and only continue until the proletariat is in position to make some changes to society. “Of course, in the beginning, this [the establishment of communism] cannot be effected except by means of despotic inroads on the rights of property, and on the conditions of bourgeois

production; by means of measure, therefore, which appear economically insufficient and untenable, but which, in the course of the movement, outstrip themselves, necessitate further inroads upon the old social order, and are unavoidable as a means of entirely revolutionizing the mode of production” (Marx, p.74). Marx uses terms like despotic inroads,’ necessitate,’ and unavoidable’ to describe the necessary violence. Violent acts are terrible things in and of themselves, but must be used at times for a greater good. However, in his ideal society, once communism has been reached there will be no more violence.

After all this, however, it is clear that Marx makes some rather remarkable assumptions regarding human nature. First, he believes that it is inevitable that the proletariat will realize that things are not as they should be, and that something needs to be done about it. Secondly, he believes that people will know the correct amount of violence necessary to achieve their goals, and will not exceed that. Finally, he assumes that once the state of communism is reached, that there will be no dissenters that will try to take advantage of the situation and raise themselves up. The rule of Stalin and Lenin are good examples of people taking an opportunity to exploit and oppress. The idea of communism would appear to be just that, an idea, an ideal. It may not

necessarily be bad to try to approach it, but because human nature is necessarily flawed in all likelihood communism will never be reached in full.

However, even with all of this, the idea of communism has done some good. Clearly it caused some reform in the area of capitalism, toning it down from what it was during the time of Marx. It has helped by acting as a mirror in which it is possible to see where society is making mistakes, and where a new balance must be struck between the needs of the individual, and the

needs of society. Even an idea such as communism which may not be fully applicable can still have, and has had, a profound effect on future society and humankind.