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Primary 4 Lesson 31 Homework

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Lesson Plan Primary 4

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Lesson Plan Primary 4

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CIMT - Page no longer available at Plymouth University servers

Centre for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching
Page no longer available at Plymouth University servers

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For those who are involved with TSST Mathematics courses the direct links to those are now;
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Primary 4: Book of Mormon Lesson 31: Samuel the Lamanite

Lesson 31: Samuel the Lamanite Suggested Lesson Development

Invite a child to give the opening prayer.

Attention Activity

Have three children from your class who read well role-play Nephi, Abinadi, and Alma. They could each have a name tag or a partial costume. They could pretend to come from a time machine to visit the class and retell their prophecies of Jesus Christ’s life and mission:

“I arrived in the promised land almost six hundred years before Christ was born. I told my people about a vision I had which taught me of Christ’s birth and death: ‘I looked and beheld the virgin again, bearing a child in her arms. And the angel said unto me: Behold the Lamb of God.’ Then I ‘saw that he was lifted up upon the cross and slain for the sins of the world’ (1 Nephi 11:20–21, 33 ). Who am I?” (Nephi.)

“I lived about one hundred and fifty years before Jesus Christ. The people did not like me and did not believe the things I told them. I prophesied that Jesus Christ would ‘come down among the children of men, and … redeem his people’ by being ‘crucified, and slain’ and taking ‘upon himself their iniquity’ (Mosiah 15:1, 7, 9 ). I was burned at the stake for my testimony. Who am I?” (Abinadi.)

“After a special vision I had about one hundred years before Jesus Christ was born, I knew that I could be saved only through our Redeemer, who would come. I traveled everywhere to tell people what I had learned, that the ‘Son of God … shall go forth, suffering pains and afflictions and temptations of every kind. … And he will take upon him death, that he may loose the bands of death [and] succor [or help] his people according to their infirmities’ (Alma 7:10–12 ). Who am I?” (Alma.)

Explain that not only did these three prophets prophesy of Jesus Christ, so have all other prophets. Refer to Mosiah 13:33. “Did not Moses prophesy unto them concerning the coming of the Messiah, and that God should redeem his people? Yea, and even all the prophets who have prophesied ever since the world began—have they not spoken more or less concerning these things?” Explain that in this lesson they will learn of another important prophet, Samuel the Lamanite, who taught with great courage and power of Christ’s birth, death, and mission.

Scripture Account

Teach the children the account of Samuel the Lamanite from Helaman 13–14. 16. (For suggested ways to teach the scripture account, see “Teaching from the Scriptures,” p. vii.) Emphasize that Samuel taught the people boldly of Jesus and the Atonement.

Discussion and Application Questions

Study the following questions and the scripture references as you prepare your lesson. Use the questions you feel will best help the children understand the scriptures and apply the principles in their lives. Reading the references with the children in class will help them gain insights into the scriptures.

What message was Samuel the Lamanite sent to reveal to the Nephites? (Helaman 13:6–7 .) What were the glad tidings Samuel was sent to teach? (Helaman 14:9, 11–13. Explain that “glad tidings” means “good news,” or the gospel.) Why is the gospel of Jesus Christ good news for us? (We can repent and be forgiven of our sins.)

What did Samuel say would happen to the Nephites if they did not repent? (Helaman 13:6, 8–10 .) Why is it important to have the Spirit with us? Why is it important not to put off repentance? (Helaman 13:38 .)

Who were the Nephites following instead of the prophets? (Helaman 13:27–29 .) What “foolish and blind guides” are leading people today? How do others sometimes try to get us to do wrong things?

Why did the people reject Samuel’s teachings? (Helaman 14:10 .)

Display the picture Samuel the Lamanite on the Wall. Why did Samuel get on the city wall? (Helaman 14:11–12 .) What did Samuel prophesy would happen in five years, and what would be the signs? (Helaman 14:2–6 .) What would be the signs at the time of Christ’s death? (Helaman 14:20–28 .) Why did the Lord reveal these signs to the Nephites? (Helaman 14:12–13, 28 .)

What did Samuel teach about the Atonement? (Helaman 14:15–18 .) What responsibility do we have when we understand the Atonement? (Helaman 14:19 .) What responsibility do we have for our actions? (Helaman 14:30–31 .)

What did the Nephites who believed Samuel do after he finished preaching? (Helaman 16:1 .) What did those who did not believe him do? (Helaman 16:6 .) Why do you think people choose not to believe the prophets? What can we do to strengthen our testimonies of the prophets?

Enrichment Activities

You may use one or more of the following activities any time during the lesson or as a review, summary, or challenge.

Find some recent talks given by the living prophet (see especially the confer-ence issues of the Ensign or one of the international magazines). Read some excerpts from the talks, and let the children discover what the prophet is teaching them to do today. Write the children’s answers on the chalkboard. Let the children each choose one principle they want to follow, and have them write it on a note card.

Make two column headings on the chalkboard: “Signs of Christ’s Birth” and “Signs of Christ’s Death.” Write all of the signs of Jesus Christ’s birth and death that were discussed in this lesson on separate pieces of paper, and mix them up in a small container. Let the children take turns picking one, reading it, and placing it under one of the two columns.

Signs of Christ’s Birth (Helaman 14:2–6 )

Great lights in heaven

A day and a night and a day as if there were no night

Many signs and wonders in heaven

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ESL Lessons for Kids, English for Primary school kids, 3rd Grade

    English Video Lessons For Primary Schools The English lessons below are for primary & elementary level school kids. Most of the lessons are videos or available as Powerpoint download with embedded sounds. All the work has been done. Just let them see it, hear it and say it. These lessons will easily teach kids new words(vocabulary), spelling, reading, listening, pronunciation and speaking. If you are a teacher or parent, this makes teaching your kids SO EASY.
  • Phonics Games & Videos Online - Teach Your Child to Read with Phonics - Phonics Games Online, Phonics Worksheets, Phonics Video Tutorials
  • English Lessons for Children - For Parents & Teachers of Kids - We offer Video Tutorials, Games, Worksheets, Powerpoint,Flashcards, Placement Tests - Kizschool.com
  • Kids Math Exercises : Math Practice for Kids - Pre-K to 8th Grade.
  • ESL Ebook Packs for Kids : Resources You can't afford not to have.
  • Math4Children.com: Free Math Worksheets, Math Games, Online Quizzes, Video Lessons and eBooks preschool,1st to 6th grade.

ESL Beginner/Elementary Lessons -3rd Grade ESL Primary/Elementary School Lessons Grade 3 MORE LESSONS Video Lessons by Unit & Level Level 1 Course Video Tutorials
  • Aim: Teach letters of the alphabet
  • Aim: Teach basic greetings – Hello, Hi, Goodbye.
  • Aim: To teach kids how to say their names.
  • Aim: Teach kids how to say their age and learn numbers 1 to 5.
  • Aim: Teach kids how to count from 1 to 10.
  • Aim: Teach kids how to describe things through colours.
  • Aim: Teach colours vocabulary
  • Aim. Teach colours through a colours songs
  • Aim: Teach kids names of fruits and how to express likes.
  • Aim: Teach kids parts of the body.
  • Aim: Teach kids how to express ability using simple action verbs. Level 2 Course Video Tutorials
  • Aim: Teach students how to express preference by using vocabulary related to farm animals.
  • Aim: Teach words and expressions used when describing family.
  • Aim: To teach words and expressions related to classroom items.
  • Aim: Teach various shapes and adjectives to describe size.
  • Aim: Teach singular and plurals of nouns and demonstrative pronouns.
  • Aim: Teach numbers 10 to 100 and pronunciation differences between long and short vowels.
  • Aim: Teach words and expressions related to toys and to ask where things are.
  • Aim: Teach days of the week and some things we do weekly.
  • Aim: Teach students how to ask about the weather and describe it.
  • Aim: Teach students about the things we eat and express want Level 3 Course Video Tutorials
  • Aim: Teach names of pets and give a brief description of pets using personality adjectives.
  • Aim: Teach students how to tell the time and also how to talk about daily routines.
  • Aim: Teach students how to tell the time using quarter to/past/ Half past etc.
  • Aim: Teach students months of the year and how to tell dates using months and ordinal numbers.
  • Aim: To teach kids how to describe jobs using action verbs.
  • Aim: Students will learn how to describe actions in progress using the present progressive.
  • Aim: Teach students different means of transport and talk about going around.
  • Aim: To learn to describe what someone is wearing.
  • Aim: Teach kids prepositions of place, alongside rooms and things at home.
  • Aim: Teach kids vegetable vocabulary and how to go shopping for veggies.
  • Aim: Teach students extra vegetable vocabulary.
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  • Aim: To teach students how to describe zoo animals by what they eat and look like. Recommended Extra Resources Our ESL Websites - We endorse the contents of the following sites
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  • Design for Manufacturing


    >= 99: A+, 94-98: A, 90-93: A-, 87 - 89: B+, 83 - 86: B, 80-82: B-, 77 - 79: C+, 73 - 76: C, 70 - 72: C-, 67-69: D+, 63-66: D, 60-62: D-, below 60: F.

    As the semester progresses, you will be informed about your assignment grade s .
    YOU HAVE 2 WEEKS TO DISPUTE YOUR GRADE ON ANY ASSIGNMENT.

    You are reminded about the College policy about academic misconduct http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/current-students/academic-misconduct.html. and plagiarism at http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/

    This course is given by the College of Engineering. This means that class policies on matters such as requirements, grading, and sanctions for academic dishonesty are governed by the College of Engineering. Students wishing to add or drop this course after the official deadline must receive the approval of the Dean of the College of Engineering. Details of the University policy of cross enrollments may be found at: http://www.uiowa.edu/

    Examinations. There will be three examinations that may contain problem solving, fill in the blank, multiple choice and true/false questions. Exams are not comprehensive. Please let the instructor know if you cannot make the exam date and time. These exams are difficult and the student is expected to read and study the assignments, attend lectures, and ask questions.

    Attendance and Class Participation. Attendance is very important, especially to get information not covered in the text. You are expected to come prepared to class by completing homework and readings, and to participate in meaningful discussions in class. Attendance will be taken randomly. Do not sign other student's names for them.

    Homework. There will be variety of homework assignments throughout the semester. Some expect exact answers and some will be "open ended" meaning that there may be several correct responses, but that there must be some logic to your response. Some homework is collected, some is put into ICON. and some will be submitted electronically. The homework link provides the method and due date.

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    Homework handed in one class period late will be given a maximum grade of 1/2 its full value. No credit will be given for homework two periods late. Also, when handing in multiple pages, please staple these together.

    Integrated Design Project. This semester long project challenges you to apply your knowledge to a product design and manufacturing scenario. This is a team project, and you will be assigned to a manufacturing team (team members). Click here for project details.

    Bonus Assignments: Throughout the semester, bonus exercises may be provided. These are optional and they can only help your manufacturing processes understanding and your grade.

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    MyMaths - Bringing maths alive

    MyMaths Overview

    MyMaths is an interactive online teaching and homework subscription website for schools that builds pupil engagement and consolidates maths knowledge. It is used in over 70 countries by approximately four million students each year!

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    MyMaths provides hundreds of lessons paired with homework for practice and assessment across the curriculum.

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    Positioning and Turning

    Adding two digits

    Upper and Lower Bounds

    Area of a Rectangle

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    Each MyMaths lesson is paired with an Online Homework to assess understanding.

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    Booster Packs are discrete blocks of work targeted at specific achievement boundaries, for example Key Stage 2 assessment in Year 6.

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    Games are an ideal way of motivating pupils to consolidate their maths skills. MyMaths games keep maths at the forefront. Each game is tailored to provide a little bit of fun and a lot of practice.

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    Complete Listing of Lessons

    Complete Listing of Lessons

    There are over 3,000 harmonica lesson videos on BluesHarmonica.com, with more being added every week! Below is a complete listing of what's on the site right now.

    LESSONS

    Most studies have full-length study songs to develop your skills. MP3s are provided for download (original tempo, 15% slow, 30% slow and jam track) as well as PDFs of the music notation, tablature and reference sheet for that lesson. Videos cover how to: perform the techniques taught; place them into the context of music; play each chorus of the song; play the song with a band; and take the licks out of the context of the song and place it into improvising.

    Blues Harmonica Fundamentals
    This lesson presents an introduction to blues harmonica. You’ll hear about the blessings and curses of the harmonica and how the harmonica has an amazing ability to make different sounds. I’ll walk you through care and maintenance as well as setting good practice habits. And finally we'll quickly walk through how to hold the harmonica and play a single note in preparation for your first study sing in Tongue Blocking Study #1, "Walk with Me.” This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to playing Blues. You'll need the A Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Introduction to the Harmonica: Introduction; Harmonica Construction and Care; Harmonica Note Construction, Chords and Embouchure; Understanding Positions; Blessings and Curses: Harmonica’s Blessings; Harmonica’s Curses; The Harmonica’s Greatest Asset; Practice Habits: How Long to Practice; What to Practice; What to Have in your Practice Room; How To Practice – How to Learn Songs Lick-by-Lick: Getting Started: Holding the Harmonica; Playing Single Notes and Articulation; Tremolo; Instruction Approach at BluesHarmonica.com

    Cupping & Hand Effects
    This lesson covers how to hold the harmonica (acoustic and with a microphone); techniques such as Hand Tremolo and Wa Wa; how to achieve killer tone playing through a mic and amplifier or through the house vocal mic. This lesson is an essential study for all students. This study is for all skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 1
    There are two main techniques to study on the harmonica: Bending and Tongue Blocking. Tongue Blocking provides you many textural options in which to present the notes you play on the harmonica and Bending provides you with new pitches and the ability to slide in and out of pitches, giving the harmonica it's bluesy mournful sound. In this study I'll show you the mechanics/physics of how the harmonica, mouth and tongue work together in the bending process. This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to bending. You'll need an A and C Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 2
    In this study you'll work on the song "Feelin' for the Blues." This song will work all of the bends you've been studying into the context of the blues. This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to bending. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.


    Bending Study 3
    In this study we'll work your bending skills at a faster tempo and on a higher-keyed harmonica. Work with the slowest version of the song provided; speed is our enemy in the beginning. You'll also find the D harmonica to be a good challenge in regards to bending control (higher-keyed harmonicas tend to bend farther and quicker than you may want). So, give yourself some time on this song, it's a real rocker! This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a D Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 4
    In this study you'll work on starting licks in the bent position as well as focusing on how to play really bluesy on the harmonica. Now that your tongue blocking skills are strengthening you'll see much more integration of tongue block techniques in this and the next level bending study. Get ready for a killer slow blues! This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 5
    This is your final level of study for draw bending on the harmonica. Our focus here is to develop your ability to hit all bends (including half steps) from all directions. "Half Steppin'" is a swing tune in the key of F, and contains very high-level licks and phrases. Expect each chorus to take at least a month to dial in. Good luck and have fun! This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a B-flat Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 6 - Blow Bending
    Blow bending is the natural next step to continue your mastery of the harmonica. in this case, the high-end. Work with me here and develop your blow bends for a bit and then move on to 1st Position Study 2 where you'll place these blow bends into the context of music. This study is for intermediate and advanced skill Level players. You'll need a D and G Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 7 - Overbending Interviews
    Our series on overbending starts with instructor Ross Garren interviewing the harmonica players that have pioneered the use of overbends in the blues. Our original intention was to do a written article, but it quickly became apparent that we should video record these Skype interviews for you to watch. Skype video quality is not the best, but we thought you would appreciate seeing and hearing them over just reading an article. After watching these interviews Ross will start to walk you through the art of overbending in the blues.

    Bending Study 8 - Overbend Study 1, Technique
    In this study we’ll define what an overbend is, what notes are available on your harmonica with overbends, how to perform an overblow and provide you with exercises for you to practice overblows on holes 4, 5 and 6. The focus of this lesson series is to show how traditional blues harmonica players can incorporate overbending into their playing. The exercises and etudes in this study will not sound bluesy at this point—they are exercises to develop technique. You’ll have an opportunity to use these overbends in a bluesy context in Overbend Study 2, where we’ll provide you with a blues harmonica instrumental to study. We’ll be using the Bb Harmonica for this entire study. As Ross Garren states in the video, a well set up harmonica will help you greatly in the performance of overbends. You can do this yourself by modifying your Bb harmonica (reference the Harp Tech series with Kinya Pollard in the Equipment section, most specifically Studies 4 and 6) or purchase a custom harmonica that’s specifically setup to overbend.

    Bending Study 9 - Overbend Study 2, Study Song
    The focus of this study song is to show you how to begin incorporating the 6OB in your second position playing. One approach that is particularly emphasized is taking licks from the lower octave of the harmonica that use the 3’ Bb and move them up an octave to 6OB Bb. Taking licks from an area you’re already very comfortable with and moving them up an octave is a great way to develop familiarity with how the 6OB can be used. As you find licks that you like in this study song, make sure to apply them to the Chorus Form process to incorporate these licks into your vocabulary.

    Bending Study 10 - Overbending Study 3, Scales and Arpeggios
    The goal of this lesson is to continue advancing your overbend skills while simultaneously filling in the harmonic/theory knowledge that’s required of a traditional blues player to be able to apply/execute overbends well in our common three positions (1st, 2nd and 3rd). This will be achieved by studying chords (arpeggios) and chord scales (a combination of chord tones and scale tones), all to give you more material to play while improvising. If you’re not already doing so, you should be working through the Music Theory Studies on the site (especially Studies 3, 4 and 5) to get the most out of this instruction. Though I’ve not taught you how to overdraw yet, I’ve included them in these exercises so that you’ll have a single point of reference for your scales. Skip these overdraws for now, but make sure to come back to this study and practice these exercises again once you can perform the technique.

    Bending Study 11 - Overbending Study 4, Study Songs 2 and 3
    In this study we apply overblows on holes 4, 5 and 6 to two study songs. “Highway 456” is in 2nd Position minor and “Swing It” is in 3rd Position. You’ll need a Bb Harmonica for this study.

    Bending Study 12 - Overbending Study 5, Expression Exercises
    In this study we dig into expressive techniques to use with your overblows, specifically dips, quarter tone bends and “false fingering.” You’ll need a Bb Harmonica for this study.


    Minor Playing

    Harmonica players will not commonly choose to play in minor due to the fact that there's not much historic precedence of our instrument doing this (in other words it's very rare and there's not much out there for us to copy). It is common though to play with other musicians and a song to be called in a minor key. What is the harmonica player to do? What position(s) are best suited for this and how do we approach it? In this study we answer those questions. You'll need three harmonica: G, A and C. This study is for intermediate and advanced skill level players.

    Tongue Blocking Study 1
    The tongue blocking embouchure is at the foundation of great blues harmonica playing. Many players tongue block all of the time (you will if you're learning with me from the start), with others adding it to their playing as they become aware of the vast array of sounds this embouchure offers. It gets down to two main techniques in the journey to becoming a great blues harmonica player. bending and tongue blocking. and this is where you start for tongue blocking. This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to tongue blocking. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Tongue Blocking Study 2
    In this level we continue your tongue blocking study with the first of the three most important tongue blocking techniques, the SLAP (pulls and octaves being the other two). Our study song "Temperature" uses the shuffle rhythm and continues to add more challenging licks to your soloing vocabulary. This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to bending. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Tongue Blocking Study 2.5 - Tongue Block Trainer
    Join me for a lesson where I present all of the common tongue block techniques in one place. Though these techniques are presented in a logical order in your Tongue Block Study Songs, this offers you the opportunity to reinforce your technique with further explanations, demonstrations and a progressive music example and accompanying MP3.

    Tongue Blocking Study 3
    In this level we continue your tongue blocking study with the second of the three most important tongue blocking techniques, the PULL (slaps and octaves being the other two). Our study song "Gary's Blues" is written in the style of Gary Smith and continues to add more challenging licks to your soloing vocabulary. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a G Harmonica for this study.

    Tongue Blocking Study 4
    In this level we continue your tongue blocking study with the third of the three most important tongue blocking techniques, the OCTAVE (slaps and pulls being the other two). Our study song "The Split" continues to add more challenging licks to your soloing vocabulary. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a B-flat Harmonica for this study.

    Tongue Blocking Study 5
    In this level we continue your octave tongue blocking study with five-hole high-end draw octaves. Our study song "Blues for Paul deLay" continues to add more challenging licks to your soloing vocabulary. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a Low F Harmonica for this study.


    Solo Harmonica Study 1
    “Solo Harmonica” is when you’re entertaining someone without any other instruments… unaccompanied. Solo Harmonica playing takes advantage of the choral nature of the harmonica and imparts a great rhythmic feel to the music. Another advantage of studying this style of playing is that it can be used to accompany another harmonica player, guitarist (in a duo setting) or in the band setting due to its twelve bar blues structure (differing from chugging, which does not commonly have chord change). In Study 1 I’ll present a whole bunch of cool rhythmic patterns for you to play. Each of these patterns will then be the basis of a full-length twelve bar blues example in Study 2. Study 3 adds bending to make the IV and V chords more robust. Study 4 I’ll present you an entire song example to study in this style. This study is for all skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    Solo Harmonica Study 2
    In Study 1 you learned a whole bunch of cool rhythmic patterns to play. We’ll now be placing all of these patterns within the twelve bar blues progression. This study is for all skill level players. You'll need a G Harmonica for this study.


    Solo Harmonica Study 3
    In Study 1 you learned a whole bunch of cool rhythmic patterns to play. In Study 2 you placed all of these patterns within the twelve bar blues progression. In Study 3 we’ll add bending to these patterns as well as more advanced usage of the IV and V Chords. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a G Harmonica for this study.

    Solo Harmonica Study 4
    In Study 1 you learned a whole bunch of cool rhythmic patterns to play. In Study 2 you placed all of these patterns within the twelve bar blues progression. In Study 3 we added bending to these patterns as well as more advanced usage of the IV and V Chords. In this Study 4 you’ll study a full-length study song called “Quiet World.” This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a G Harmonica for this study.

    Tremolo and Vibrato
    One of the most important tools a harmonica player has to express emotion through their music is the tremolo and vibrato. In this lesson you’ll learn the differences between tremolo and vibrato as well as where and how to use it. I’ll also give you a playing example for you to experiment with the different types of tremolo and vibrato all in one song. This study is for all skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Understanding Position Playing
    Position playing is one of the most difficult areas of study to understand—yet it’s at the heart of blues harmonica playing. In this lesson I’ll define each position, explain where and why they’re used, and give you some playing examples to explore these differences. I’ll also explain and give a playing example on how advanced players can use position playing over chord changes. Positions covered are 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 12th. Level: Sections 1 and 2 are good for all levels to watch. Section 3 is for advanced players. You'll need your whole set of harmonicas for this study (a set commonly consists of: Low F, G, A, B-flat, C and D).

    3rd Position Study 1
    Third position is one of the three most common positions used by blues harmonica players. Its dark sound (great for playing songs in minor) and range (more usable range than second position) makes it a favorite among top-level players. Third position is also wonderfully suited for jump and swing blues (as well as a great primer for learning how to play blues chromatic, since the chromatic harmonica is most commonly played in third position). In this study we'll dig into the mechanics of what makes third position work; figure which key you're playing in; start by learning how to intuitively move around third position; as well as a full study song to start your journey in developing a vocabulary for playing in third position. This study is for all skill level players (as well as beginners). If you're coming to this study from the Beginning Study Outline, skip all the prep videos and just jump right into learning the song. This study is for beginning skill level players or those new to 3rd Position playing. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    3rd Position Study 2
    In this study we'll add tongue blocking to our previous song example "Rollin' Rhumba." This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    3rd Position Study 3
    In this study we'll add articulate bending to our previous song example "Rollin' Rhumba" Version 2. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    3rd Position Study 4
    In this study we'll dig into jump and swing blues playing with a faster tempo and tons of arpeggiated passages. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the A-flat Harmonica for this study.

    3rd Position Study 5
    In this study we'll dig into the darker, more bluesy sound of third position playing with the study song "It's Right." This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    3rd Position Study 6
    In this study we'll dig into how to play in minor for third position (which is a great position choice for minor playing). This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need both the C and G harmonicas for this study.


    3rd Position Study 7
    In this study we'll continue our minor playing in third position to develop more valuable lick vocabulary. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need both C and G harmonicas for this study.

    1st Position Study 1
    We have three common positions that we play in as blues harmonica players: 2nd Position, 3rd Position and 1st Position. studied in that order. 1st Position offers great low-end (think Rice Miller's "Trust My Baby") and high-end playing (think Jimmy Reed's "Honest I Do"). In this lesson you'll learn how to navigate the lower four holes of 1st Position with the study song "The Tub." This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    1st Position Study 2
    In this lesson you'll learn how to navigate the upper four holes of the harmonica in 1st Position. This is also your first study song to use blow bending. each chorus progressively working your blow bend skills. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the G Harmonica for this study.

    1st Position Study 3
    In this lesson you'll learn how to navigate the entire range of the harmonica in 1st Position with our slow blues study song "The Stretch." This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Blues Chromatic Study 1
    The chromatic harmonica is a very intuitive instrument to play the blues on. In this first of five lessons we'll focus on: embouchure, cupping (acoustic and electric), models available, tuning, positions, what the slide does, care and maintenance, an intuitive approach to playing the chromatic and the study song "No Sweat." This study is for all skill level players (as well as beginners). If you're coming to this study from the beginning study outline, skip all the prep videos and just jump right into learning the song. You'll need a standard solo-tuned C Chromatic Harmonica for this study. I recommend the Hohner Super Chromonica 270 Deluxe (12-hole). If you already own a solo-tuned chromatic that's 10, 12 or 16-hole in size, these will also work just fine.

    Blues Chromatic Study 2
    In this study we'll take your blues chromatic skills to the next level with the use of the flutter tongue and pull. Our study song "Cool Blue" is a shuffle in the key of D and is a real rocker. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a C Chromatic Harmonica for this study.


    Blues Chromatic Study 3
    In this study we'll take your blues chromatic skills to the next level with the use of the fake octave and dips (bending). Our study song "Easy Baby" is a slow hook-based groove in the key of D. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a C Chromatic Harmonica for this study.


    Blues Chromatic Study 4
    In this study we'll take your blues chromatic skills to the next level with the use of the octave and learning how to play in minor. Our study song "So Blue For You" is a slow blues in the key of Dm. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a C Chromatic Harmonica for this study.


    Blues Chromatic Study 5
    In this study we'll use all of the techniques you've learned so far for the chromatic at BluesHarmonica.com! Also included is a solo section on the G Diatonic Harmonica in 2nd Position to show how you can switch between the chromatic and the diatonic in the same song. Our study song "The Big One" is a rock beat in the key of D. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a C Chromatic and G Diatonic Harmonica for this study.

    Improvising Study 1 - Chorus Forms
    We study songs to gain technique, movement, vocabulary and of course to be able to play a song we enjoy. The ultimate goal of all music studies though is self-expression. to improvise solos and write memorable instrumentals. In these studies I demystify the art of blues improvisation. teaching you how to organize licks within the twelve bar blues progression, basically how we use repetition to create memorable solos called Chorus Forms. Videos Include: Introduction to Improvising and the Chorus Form Process; The Principle of Chorus Forms, Part 1; The Principle of Chorus Forms, Part 2; Review of the 12 Bar Blues Form; AAA Chorus Form - 4 Measure Lick; AAA Chorus; Form - 2 and 1 Measure Licks; AAA Chorus Form with Variation; AAA Chorus Form Homework; AAB Chorus Form; AAB Chorus Form Homework; AAA Chorus Form with Fills; AAB Chorus Form with Fills; AAA and AAB Chorus Forms with Fills Homework; A B/A C Chorus Form, Part 1; A B/A C Chorus Form, Part 2; A B/A C Chorus Form Homework; Homework Assignment #1, Part 1; Homework Assignment #1, Part 2; Homework Assignment #2, Part 1; Homework Assignment #2, Part 2; Homework Assignment #3; Final Words and Closing

    Improvising Study 2 - Focus Notes, Textures & Rhythm
    In your last study you learned how to use repetition to create memorable solos and instrumentals. In this study you’ll learn the art of Focus Notes (helps in your lick decision process and in moving you around the range of the harmonica), Textures and Rhythm. Videos Include: Introduction; The Focus Notes Concept; The Focus Note Process; 1 Focus Note; 2'' Focus Note; 2 Focus Note; 3 Focus Note; 4 Focus Note; 5 Focus Note; 6+ Focus Note; 7 Focus Note; 8 Focus Note; 9 Focus Note; 9+ Focus Note; Focus Note Context; Homework Assignment 1 Analysis Temperature; Homework Assignment 1 Analysis Temperature Answers; Homework Assignment 2; Summarizing Focus Notes; Using Textures; Homework Assignment 1 Analysis The Split; Homework Assignment 1 Analysis The Split Answers; Homework Assignment 2; Using Rhythm; Homework Assignment; Closing

    Improvising Study 3 - Dynamics
    In Study 1 you learned how to use repetition to create memorable solos and instrumentals. In Study 2 you learned the art of Focus Notes, Textures and Rhythm. In Study 3 we focus on the most important and most underused element in conveying emotion. dynamics. Videos Include: Section 1 - Introduction; Section 2 - Exploring Dynamic Range, Parts 1 and 2; Section 3 - Tools for Adding Dynamics into your Playing: Changing Volume each Chorus; Changing Volume with Chord Change; Changing Volume within a Phrase; Speed and Decay; Embouchure and Hand Tone; Section 4 – Review & Final Homework Assignment

    Improvising Study 4 - V-IV-I Transitions
    In Improvising Study 1 you learned how to use repetition to create memorable solos and instrumentals. In Improvising Study 2 you learned the art of Focus Notes, Textures and Rhythm. In Improvising Study 3 we focused on the most important and most underused element in conveying emotion. dynamics. In this study we develop your V-IV-I lick vocabulary by building up your chord knowledge and studying almost a 100 licks from great players of the past and present. Videos Include: Section 1 - V-IV-I Introduction; Introduction; V-IV-I Transition Licks Defined - Part 1; V-IV-I Transition Licks Defined - Part 2; Section 2 - V-IV-I Chord Tones; V-IV-I Chord Tones - Chord Tones; V-IV-I Chord Tones - Chord Tones and Improvisation; V-IV-I Chord Tones - Multiple Chord Tones; Section 3 - V-IV-I Arpeggios; V-IV-I Arpeggios; Section 4 - V-IV-I Transition Licks; V-IV-I Lick Intro; V-IV-I Licks - Examples 1 through 25; V-IV-I Licks - Examples 26 through 34; V-IV-I Licks - Examples 35 through 51; V-IV-I Licks - Examples 52 through 59; V-IV-I Licks - Examples 60 through 82; II-V-I Licks; Section 5 - Homework; Homework

    Improvising Study 5 - Turnarounds
    In this study we’ll develop your Turnaround lick vocabulary as well as learn how to utilize this area of the 12 Bar Blues to help lead into the next chorus of a solo. Videos include: Section 1 - Turnaround Introduction: Introduction; Review of V-IV-I Transitions (Improvising Study 4); Turnaround Definition; Section 2 - Approaches: Classic Turnaround; No Turnaround; Pickup to Next Chorus; Buildup to Next Chorus; Start Next Chorus Early; Section 3 - Turnaround Chord Tones: Example 1 - I-V Turnaround Chord Tones; Example 2 - I-IV-I-IV Turnaround Chord Tones; Example 3 - I-VI-II-V Turnaround Chord Tones; Section 4 - Turnaround Lick Vocabulary: Classic Turnaround Licks - Examples 1-17; Classic Turnaround Licks - Examples 18-34; Buildup Licks - Examples 1-12; Classic Slow Blues Turnaround Licks - Examples 1-17; Sections 5 & 6 - Song Analysis & Homework: Song Analysis & Homework; Closing

    Improvising Study 6 - Endings
    All great songs have to come to an end, and they should be finished with a great ending lick! In this lesson you'll study the art of how to approach different ending types and study 30 killer ending licks to add to your vocabulary. Videos Include: Section 1 - Common Ending Types: Introduction; Ending Types; Section 2 - Rhythmic Approaches: Rhythmic; Approaches; Section 3 - Ending Licks: Ending Examples 1 through 9; Ending Examples 10 through 17; Ending Examples 18 through 30; Section 4 - Homework Assignments: Homework Assignment #1; Homework Assignment #2; Closing

    Improvising Study 7 - Heads, Hooks, Bridges & Soloing Themes
    In this Improvising Study we dig into the two most important elements of instrumental song writing-the Head and Hook. I also share with you how bridges, hooks and soloing themes can be used to help keep an instrumental interesting, even in the most basic of grooves. Videos Include: Section 1 - Introduction; Introduction; Section 2 - Head, Hook & Bridge; Definition of the Head; Head Examples; More Head Examples; Hook Definition and Example; Bridge Definition; Bridge Example; Section 3 - Breaks; Breaks - Bar 1; Breaks - Bar 12; Breaks - Off The Wall; Section 4 - Soloing Themes; Soloing Approaches; Building in Pitch; Building in Activity; Building in Texture; Positions; Final thoughts on Soloing Themes; Section 5 - Song Analysis & Homework; Song Analysis; Composition Checklist & Homework

    Improvising Study 8 - Soloing Blocks & Chord Tone Soloing
    In this study we get to know each range of your harmonica with the concept Soloing Blocks as well as dig into how the knowledge of chords will take you to the next level in your improvising skills and understanding of music. Videos Include: Section 1 - Understanding Chords and Your Harmonica: Introduction; Memorizing your C Harmonica; Memorizing the 2nd Position Chords; Section 2 - Soloing Blocks: Holes 1-2 Soloing Block; Holes 1-2 Soloing Block Chord Focus Notes; Holes 1-2 Soloing Block Hole Changes - Part 1; Holes 1-2 Soloing Block Hole Changes - Part 2; Holes 1-3 Soloing Block - Part 1; Holes 1-3 Soloing Block - Part 2; Holes 1-4 Soloing Block; Holes 1-5 Soloing Block; Holes 1-6 Soloing Block; Holes 6-10 Soloing Block; Final Words on Soloing Blocks; Section 3 - Chord Tone Soloing; Chord Tone Soloing - Part 1; Chord Tone Soloing - Part 2; Closing

    Improvising Study 9 - Approaches
    In this improvising study we dig into how to approach different playing situations. The feel of a song (light, bluesy and mixture) heavily influences your note choices on the harmonica. Modal blues is where there's no chord change. though very liberating, it can be challenging to play to when you've been developing your phrasing based on chord change all these years. I give you a plan of attack for improvising to very fast tempos. no doubt a challenge for all skill level players. Finally, I briefly cover the approach to slow blues. Videos Include: Section 1 - Playing According to the Feel of a Song: Introduction; Light Feel - Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 1; Light Feel - Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 2; Bluesy Feel - Blues Scale; Mixture of Light & Bluesy Feel, Part 1; Mixture of Light & Bluesy Feel, Part 2; Review, Section 2 - Modal Blues: Modal Blues, Part 1; Modal Blues, Part 2; Modal Blues, Part 3; Section 3 - Speed Playing: Speed Playing - Approach #1; Speed Playing - Approach #2; Speed Playing - Approach #3; Speed Playing - Approach #4; Speed Playing - Approach #5; Speed Playing - All Approaches in a Solo; Section 4 - Slow Blues: Approach to Slow Blues; Closing Thoughts

    Improvising Study 10 - The Improviser’s Mind: The Big Picture
    In this last improvising lesson I review the concepts taught in Improvising Studies 1 through 9 and go into detail about: theory; chorus form usage versus free-form soloing; memorized solos versus improvised solos; perspective for each skill level of player on improvising; perspective for other styles of music; recommendations on how to organizing your licks and the value of transcribing. This is for students who have finished Improvising Studies 1 through 9 or for those who like to read the last page of a book first ;-). No harmonica is needed for study. Videos Include: Section 1 - Introduction (Imp Study 10): Introduction; Section 2 - Review of Studies 1-9 (Imp Study 10): Review of Improvising Studies 1 through 9 Introduction; Review of Improvising Study 1 - Chorus Forms; Review of Improvising Study 2 - Focus Notes, Textures & Rhythm; Review of Improvising Study 3 - Dynamics; Review of Improvising Studies 4 through 6 - V-IV-I, Turnaround & Ending Licks; Review of Improvising Studies 7 - Heads, Hooks, Bridges, Arrangement & Tribute Writing and Soloing Themes; Review of Improvising Studies 8 - Soloing Blocks & Chord Tone Soloing; Review of Improvising Studies 9 - Approaches; Section 3 - Discussions on Improvising (Imp Study 10); Theory: Acquisition of Knowledge; Chorus Forms versus Free-Form Improvising; Memorized versus Improvised Performing; Learning Another Instrument; Improvising Focus for Different Skill-Level Players; Closing Thoughts
    Improvising Study 11 - Melodic Development
    In this lesson we'll study the melodic devices used by trained songwriters and how those ideas can be used for your instrumental songwriting. The greats of blues harmonica use these devices subconsciously in their improvising. Our focus is to identify these devices, study them, and practice them so that you too can use these ideas in your songwriting, and eventually in your improvising. This lesson is for advanced skill level players (or those generally interested in the art of songwriting). You'll need the B-flat harmonica for this study. Section 1 - Lick (Motif) Analysis: Introduction to Improvising 11; Primer to Improvising 11; Lick Analysis - Part 1; Lick Analysis - Part 2; Section 2 - Melodic Treatments: Melodic Treatment - Part 1; Melodic Treatment - Part 2; Section 3 - Textural Development: Textural Development; Section 4 - Harmonic Development: Harmonic Development; Section 5 - Blow! Blow! Blow! Study Song: Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 1; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 2; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 3; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 4; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 5; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 6; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 7; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 8; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 9; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 10; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Choruses 11 and 12; Blow! Blow! Blow! - Chorus 13; Closing to Improvising 11

    Harpboxing
    Join Brandon O. Bailey and I for a lesson on the new harmonica style called Harpboxing. This is outside the traditional blues focus of BluesHarmonica.com, but I thought you would enjoy this journey into something completely different! Videos include: Introducing Brandon O. Bailey: Introduction; Basics of Harpboxing: History of Harpboxing; Elements of Beatboxing; Elements of Harpboxing; Harmonica Tuning Options; Harpboxing Patterns: Harpboxing Pattern #1; Harpboxing Pattern #2; Harpboxing Pattern #3; Harpboxing Pattern #4; Harpboxing Pattern #5; Harpboxing Patterns Mixed; Harpboxing Equipment: Harpboxing Microphone & Technique; Closing Harpboxing & Looper Performance

    Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player - Study 1
    Join me for the Basics of Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player. In this lesson you'll learn: how pitch is produced on the harmonica; music notation; sharps; flats; naturals; half steps; whole steps; key signatures; the construction of the major scale; how the harmonica received its note layout/tuning; how to move melodies up or down the harmonica's range; and how to take any sheet music, written for any instrument, and figure out how to play it on the harmonica. This lesson is for all skill levels players. No harmonica is needed for this study, though a C Harmonica is used for demonstration purposes if you would like to play along. Videos include: Section 1 - Basics of Pitch: Introduction to Music Theory Study 1; Pitch Defined; Octave and Half Step Defined; Sharps and Flats Defined; Examples 1.2 and 1.3 - Chromatic Scale; Examples 1.4 through 1.5 - Notes on the Staff, Part 1; Examples 1.6 through 1.9 - Notes on the Staff, Part 2; Section 1 Questions; Section 2 - The Major Diatonic Scale (The Harmonica’s Scale): Example 2.1 - The Major Mode; Examples 2.2 and 2.3 - Harmonica TAB on the Staff; Example 2.4 - Harmonica Note Layout; Examples 2.5 and 2.6 - Bends on the Harmonica; Example 2.7 and Section 2 Questions; Section 3 - Scale Degrees & Tuning System: Examples 3.1 through 3.4 - Scale Degrees; Example 3.5 - Major Scales; Why there are multiple Major Scales; Section 3 Questions; Section 4 - Review & Application: When the Saints Go Marching In song Example; Song Transposition Exercise; Section 4 Questions; Music Theory Study 1 Closing Comments

    Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player - Study 2
    Join me for our second lesson on Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player, where we explore modes and positions. In this lesson you'll learn: what modes are associated with each position; how to figure out what key you and the band are playing in for the various positions; and how to make your own harmonica position chart. Videos: Section 1 - 1st Position (Major Mode): Introduction to Music Theory Study 2; Examples 1.2 to 1.8; Section 1 Questions; Section 2 - 2nd Position (Mixolydian Mode): Examples 2.1 & 2.2 - Mixolydian Scales & Finding Key for 2nd Position; Examples 2.3 to 2.7; Section 2 Questions; Section 3 - 3rd Position (Dorian Mode): Examples 3.1 & 3.2 - Dorian Scales & Finding Key for 3rd Position; Examples 3.3 to 3.7; Section 3 Questions; Section 4 - 4th Position (Minor Mode): Examples 4.1 & 4.2 - Minor Scales & Finding Key for 4th Position; Examples 4.3 to 4.7; Section 4 Questions; Section 5 - Position Quick Charts; Position Quick Charts

    Music Theory Study 3 - Intervals, Chords & 12 Bar Blues
    Join me for our third lesson on Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player, where we explore the intervallic relationship between notes of the scale, chords and our familiar 12 Bar Blues Progression. In this lesson you'll learn: interval names; the three triad chord qualities; about 7th and 9th Chords; the notes of the 12 Bar Blues Progression; about minor keys and chords; and how to play the notes of each chord within the 12 Bar Blues Progression. This lesson is for intermediate skill levels players. You'll need a C Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Section 1 - Intervals & Triads; Introduction to Music Theory Study 3: Examples 1.1 and 1.2 - Intervals; Examples 1.3 to 1.5 - Chords; Section 1 Questions; Section 2 - 12 Bar Blues Progression & Triads:; Examples 2.1 to 2.5 - 12 Bar Blues; Examples 2.6 to 2.9; Section 2 Questions; Section 3 - 12 Bar Blues Progression & 7th Chords: Examples 3.1 to 3.4 - 7th Chords; Examples 3.5 to 3.9; Section 3 Questions; Section 4 - 12 Bar Blues Progression, One Hole at a Time: Examples 4.1 to 4.3; Example 4.4; Examples 4.6 to 4.19; Section 4 Questions: Section 5 - Minor Blues Chords: Minor Chords and Key; Section 6 - Extended Chord Tones: Upper Extensions and 6th Chords; Section 7 - Another Look at Harmonica Construction: How the Harmonica is Built from the Chord Perspective; Closing for Music Theory Study 3

    Music Theory Study 4 - Melodic Development, Part 1
    Join me for our fourth lesson on Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player, where we explore melodic development… how chords and scales work together to create great solos. In this lesson you’ll learn about chord tones, scale tones, outside tones, active tones, non-active tones, passing tones, upper and lower neighbor tones, appoggiatura, the hierarchy of note selection, chord scales, sequences and chord-tone soloing. This lesson is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a C Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Section 1 – Chord-Tones, Scale Tones and Outside Tones: Introduction to Music Theory Study 4; Examples 1.1 to 1.7 - Review; Example 1.8 - Chord Tone Soloing; Examples 1.9 to 1.11 - Scale Tones (Passing & Neighbor); Examples 1.12 and 1.13 - Appoggiatura; Example 1.14, Part 1 - Chord Tone & Scale Tone Soloing; Example 1.14, Part 2 - Chord Tone & Scale Tone Soloing; Examples 1.15 and 1.16 - Hierarchy of Note Selection; Examples 1.17 to 1.19 - Chord Scales; Section 1 Questions, Part 1; Section 1 Questions, Part 2; Section 2 – Perspective: Section 2 Examples - Perspective; Section 3 – Sequences: Section 3 Examples - Sequences; Section 3 Questions; Section 4 – Chord Tone Soloing: Section 4 Examples - Chord Tone Soloing; Closing to Music Theory Study 4

    Music Theory Study 5 - Soloing Scales
    Join me for our fifth lesson on Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player, where we explore Soloing Scales… scales specifically designed to be playable over all chords in the 12 Bar Blues, guaranty a specific feel when adhered to (Major for the Major Pentatonic Scale and Bluesy/Minor for the Blues Scale), and lay extremely well on the entire range of the harmonica. Videos Include: Section 1 – Major & Major Pentatonic Scales: Introduction to Music Theory Study 5; Example 1.1 - C Major Scale; Examples 1.2 to 1.5 - G Major Scale & Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 1; Examples 1.5 to 1.8 - Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 2; Example 1.9 - Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 3 (Playing Example); Section 1 Questions; Section 2 – Minor & Blues Scales: Examples 2.1 to 2.6 - G Minor Scale & Blues Scale; Example 2.7 - Blues Scale Playing Example; Section 3 – Context: Context Review; Section 4 – Memorization: Memorization and Closing

    Music Theory Study 6 - Beyond 12 Bar Blues
    Join me for our sixth lesson on Music Theory for the Blues Harmonica Player, where we explore how to deal with non-12 Bar Blues Changes. In this lesson we cover Chord Voicings, 12 Bar Blues, 8 Bar Blues, 16 Bar Blues, 20 bar Blues, 24 Bar Blues and how to figure out and deal with songs that are outside the standard form. For your convenience I've pulled some of the audio from the video examples and saved them as MP3s for you to practice with on your own. I hope you enjoy and get as much out of this lesson as I did! Videos Include: Section 1 – Standard 12 Bar Blues: Introduction to Music Theory Study 6; Chord Scales and Chord Voicing Options; Chord Arpeggios, Chord Fragments and Stylistic Approaches; Example 1.1 - Long Changes; Example 1.2 - Quick Change; Section 2 – 12 Bar Blues Variations: Example 2.1 - No IV Chord (Bars 5 and 6); Example 2.2 - IV Chord in Bars 1 and 2; Example 2.4 - Bar 9 Options: Long V (Bars 9 and 10); Example 2.5 - Bar 9 Options: ii-V-I; Example 2.6 - Bar 9 Options: Flat-VI Chord; Example 2.7 - Turnaround Options: None; Example 2.8 - Turnaround Options: All of Bar 12; Example 2.9 - Turnaround Options: I-IV-I-V and Overuse of Root Note; Example 2.10 - Turnaround Options: I-VI-II-V; Section 3 – 8 Bar Blues: Example 3.1 - 8 Bar Blues: Key to the Highway; Example 3.2 - 8 Bar Blues: Walkin’ By Myself; Example 3.3A - 8 Bar Blues: Just Your Fool (Verse); Example 3.3B - 8 Bar Blues: Just Your Fool (Bridge); Example 3.4 - 8 Bar Blues: It Hurts Me Too; Example 3.5 - 8 Bar Blues: Nobody's Business; Section 4 – Other Forms: Examples 4.1 to 4.4 - 16, 20 and 24 Bar Blues; Section 5 – Transcribing Chords: Transcribing and Soloing to Key to the Highway Chord Changes, Part 1; Transcribing and Soloing to Key to the Highway Chord Changes, Part 2; Transcribing and Soloing to Stormy Monday Chord Changes, Part 1; Transcribing and Soloing to Stormy Monday Chord Changes, Part 2; Final Words of Advice from John Garcia

    Movement Exercises Study 1 - Patterns
    In this lesson you'll learn how to move around the entire range of your harmonica using your home scale (A Major Scale on your A Major Harmonica). We'll dig into Movement and Breath Patterns as well as how you can use your jaw to facilitate greater ease of motion and speed in your playing. This is lesson will benefit all skill levels of players. You'll need an Harmonica for this study (advanced players will also need the B-Flat Harmonica). Videos Include: Section 1 - Breathing, Movement, Ear Training & Mental Model: Introduction to Movement Patterns; Recognizing Breathing and Movement Patterns in Music; Developing a Mental Model; Ear Training; Section 2 - Movement Scale: Example 1 - Middle Octave; Example 1 - Upper Octave; Example 1 - Lower Octave; Example 1 - Entire Range; Section 3 - Movement & Breathing Patterns: Example 2 - Jaw Movement, Part 1; Example 2 - Jaw Movement, Part 2; Example 3 - Movement vs. Pattern; Example 4; Example 5; Example 6; Section 4 - Application; Section 4 - Application; Closing to Movement Patterns

    Movement Exercises Study 2 - Essential Scales
    In this lesson we'll dig into the Essential Scales for the blues harmonica player. our C Major Movement Scale, Major Pentatonic and Blues. Video Include: Section 1 - Scales Discussion: Introduction to Essential Scales; What is Essential and for Whom; Section 2 - Essential Scales: C Major Movement Scale; C Major Pentatonic Scale; C Blues Scale; Grouping Scales for Practice; G Major Pentatonic Scale; G Blues Scale; D Major Pentatonic Scale; D Blues Scale; F Major Pentatonic Scale; Section 3 - Closing Words: Closing Words for Essential Scales

    Movement Exercises Study 3 - Arpeggios
    In this lesson we'll dig into the Essential Arpeggios for the blues harmonica player. This lesson is for Intermediate and Advanced skill levels of players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Introduction to Arpeggios; Arpeggios Based on C Major Movement Scale; 2nd Position Arpeggios; F and A7 Arpeggios; Closing Words for Arpeggio Study

    Movement Exercises Study 4 - Summed Practice
    In this study I sum the most important movements, scales and arpeggios into one daily exercise. The recording is played to a metronome to help you keep in time with me and runs from the first example through the last without stopping, creating a 5-minute warmup for you in your daily practice.

    Accompaniment Study 1
    In this lesson I'll discuss the mindset required for accompaniment playing and demonstrate the common ways in which great blues harmonica players approach this art. No harmonica is needed for this study, though make sure to download the example songs for you to listen to and study in preparation for future lessons (if you would like to jam along to them after studying them, you'll need an A Harmonica). Videos Include: Section 1 - Accompaniment Approaches: Introduction to Accompaniment Playing Study 1; Accompaniment Principles; Approaches to Accompaniment Playing, Part 1; Approaches to Accompaniment Playing, Part 2; Section 2 – Accompaniment Study Songs: Homework for Accompaniment Playing Study 1; Closing to Accompaniment Playing Study 1).

    Accompaniment Study 2
    In this lesson you'll learn the basics of 12 Bar Blues and how to play the most important note of each chord. the root note. This lesson brings your first study song, "I Want You With Me," a shuffle in the key of E with vocals and guitar solos for you to play under as well as two solo sections where we apply choruses from your Tongue Blocking Study 2 study song, "Temperature." Make sure to use this opportunity to memorize your C Harmonica and the root notes of our three chords in 2nd Position. Videos include: Section 1 – Root Notes for 12 Bar Blues: Introduction to Accompaniment Playing Study 2; 12 Bar Blues & Root Notes; Example 1.9 – Long-Held Root Notes; Example 1.10 – Charleston Rhythm; Example 1.11 – Lower Octave for IV (C) and V Chords (D); Example 1.12 – Longer Hold for V-IV-I and Turnaround; Example 1.13 – Octave Jumps for V-IV-I and Turnaround; Example 1.14 – Shake for V-IV-I and Ascending Turnaround; Example 1.15 – Slow Blues with Quick Change; Section 2 - Accompaniment Study 2, Study Song: “I Want You With Me” Study Song Explained; “I Want You With Me” Study Song Played; Closing Comments to Accompaniment Playing Study 2

    Accompaniment Study 3
    In this lesson we'll complete the basic three-note chord (called a triad) used by accompanying musicians in the blues. This lesson also brings your second accompaniment study song, "Blues Creapin' Over Me," a slow blues in the key of E with the classic blues break and vocals (Gary Smith) and guitar (Jon Lawton) for you to play under, as well as a solo section. Videos Include: Section 1 – Building Chords (Triads = 3 Notes in 3rds): Introduction to Accompaniment Playing Study 3; 12 Bar Blues Triads Defined (Examples 1.1 thru 1.5); Chords and the Harmonica (Examples 1.6 and 1.7); Section 2 – Applying Chords to the 12 Bar Blues (Hole Changes): Hole Changes (Examples 2.1 to 2.3); Chord Arpeggios (Examples 2.4 and 2.5); Section 3 – Acc Study Song 3: the Blues Break: The Blues Break; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Part 1; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Part 2; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Played without Vocals; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Played with Vocals; Closing Comments to Accompaniment Playing Study 3

    Accompaniment Study 4
    In this lesson we dig into how to play fills between vocal phrases, as well as more dynamic ideas to play under vocals and instrumentalist solos. "I Want You With Me" is again our study song, but written in a more advanced way… the way a pro player would approach this song. The solos will apply choruses from your Tongue Blocking Study 3 study song, "Gary’s Blues." This intermediate skill level players, though bending is moderate (if you’ve finished Bending Study 3, then you’re ready to take on this challenge). You'll need an A Harmonica for this study. Videos Include: Accompaniment Study 4 Intro & Review: Accompaniment Study 4 Introduction; Accompaniment Study 2 Review; Accompaniment Study 3 Review; Accompaniment Study 4 – Section 1: Transitions: Transitions into Chord Change – Example 1.1; Transitions into Chord Change – Example 1.2; Transitions into Chord Change – Applied to Vocals; Accompaniment Study 4 – Section 2: Vocals with Fills: Vocals with Fills – Example 2.1; Vocals with Fills – Example 2.2; Vocals with Fills – Example 2.3; Vocals with Fills – Example 2.4; Accompaniment Study 4 – Section 3: Chording Under Vocals; Accompaniment Study 4 – Section 3: Chording Under Vocals; Chording Under Vocals – Example 3.2; Accompaniment Study 4 – Study Song: I Want You With Me, Version 2: Chorus 1; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Verse 1; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Verse 2; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Guitar Solo; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Second Vocal Section, Verse 1; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Second Vocal Section, Verse 2; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Third Vocal Section, Verse 1; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Third Vocal Section, Verse 2; I Want You With Me, Version 2: Played; Closing Comments to Accompaniment Study 4

    Accompaniment Study 5
    In this lesson we continue our studies of Hole Changes, this time with the use of bending to make our harmonica more complete across its range. We'll also spend time on how to use the bluesy flat-7th of each chord. as well as the less-common 6th. "Blues Creapin' Over Me" comes back again, this time as Version 2 with very bluesy bends, fills and a solo influenced by our Bending Study 4 song, "My Blues." This lesson is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need an A and C Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Acc Study 5 - Section 1: Building the 7th Chord: Accompaniment Study 5 Introduction; 7th Chord Construction; When the Flat-7th is Appropriate; Examples 1.6 and 1.7; Acc Study 5 - Section 2: Hole Changes with 7th Chords: Exploring Holes 1 and 2 with 7ths; Exploring Hole 3 with 7ths; Exploring Holes 4 through 6 with 7ths; Examples 2.3 through 2.6; Acc Study 5 - Section 3: Arpeggios and the 12 Bar Blues; Arpeggios and the 12 Bar Blues Example; Acc Study 5 - Section 4: Study Song: Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Choruses 1 & 2; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Solo & Chorus 4; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Verse 1 Played; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Verse 2 Played; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Solo Played; Blues Creapin’ Over Me, Version 2: Verse 4 Played; Accompaniment Study 5 Closing

    Accompaniment Study 6
    In this lesson we study how to approach playing horn lines and organ padding on the harmonica. This study brings a new slow blues jam track and full-length study song, this time a uptempo boogie with vocals and extended solos (solo based on Little Walter-style phrasing). This lesson is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonica for this study. Videos Include: Acc Study 6 - Section 1: Exploring Hole Changes in Octaves: Accompaniment Study 6 Introduction; Exploring Octaves: Examples 1.1 to 1.4; Exploring Octaves: Examples 1.5 and 1.6; Acc Study 6 - Section 2: Long-Tones & Organ Padding: Organ Approach: Examples 2.1 to 2.3; Organ Approach: Organ with Fills; Acc Study 6 - Section 3: Horn Lines: Vertical Approach to Horn Lines; Horizontal Approach to Horn Lines; Acc Study 6 - Section 4: Harmonica Harmonies: Harmonica Harmonies: Examples 4.1 and 4.2; Harmonica Harmonies: “It Takes Three” Example Song; Acc Study 6 - Section 5: Study Song – Used to Be My Baby: Used to Be My Baby: Head; Used to Be My Baby: Verse 1; Used to Be My Baby: Verse 2; Used to Be My Baby: Vocal Chorus; Used to Be My Baby: Guitar Solo Backing; Used to Be My Baby: Verse @ 1:52; Used to Be My Baby: Vocal Chorus @ 2:07; Used to Be My Baby: Harp Solo; Used to Be My Baby: Vocal Chorus @ 3:08 to End; Accompaniment Study 6 Closing

    Accompaniment Study 7
    In this lesson we study how to approach playing bass lines on the harmonica. Bass lines not only sound great on the harmonica, they also help to intuitively teach the chords of the 12 Bar Blues. Videos Include: Section 1: Root Bass Lines; Accompaniment Study 7 Introduction; Example 1.1 - Lump; Example 1.2 - Lump: Transitions; Example 1.3 - Lump: Pulls; Section 2: Root-5 Bass Lines; Examples 2.1 & 2.2 - 2-Beat: Descending & Ascending 5th; Examples 2.3 & 2.4 - 2-Beat: Mixed with Pickups; Section 3: Root-3-5 Bass Lines; Examples 3.1 & 3.2 - Slow Blues & Shuffle; Example 3.3 - Rhumba; Section 4: Root-3-5-6 Bass Lines; Example 4.1 - Rhumba with 6th; Examples 4.2 to 4.5 – Shuffle with 6th; Section 5: Bass Lines with Flat-7ths; Example 5.1 - Shuffle Pyramid with Flat-7th; Examples 5.2 through 5.8 - Bass Lines with Flat-7ths; Examples 5.9 through 5.12 - Bass Lines with Flat-7ths; Section 6: Bass Line Transitions; Examples 6.1 and 6.2 - Transitions; Accompaniment Study 7 Closing

    Accompaniment Study 8
    In this lesson we study killer hooks that can be played on the harmonica. In songwriting, heads and hooks are the main elements used to make a song different, unique, exciting and memorable. When a hook is used, it makes sense that we should play it as well (doubling with the other instruments). Videos Include: Acc Study 8 - Section 1: Bass Line Hooks; Accompaniment Study 8 Introduction; Hook Defined; Bass Line Hooks: Examples 1.1 to 1.5; Bass Line Hooks: Examples 1.6 to 1.10; Acc Study 8 - Section 2: Hooks: Examples 2.1 to 2.4; Hooks: Examples 2.5 to 2.10; Hooks & Fragments: Examples 3.1 to 3.5; Accompaniment Study 8 Closing

    Accompaniment Study 9
    In this lesson we dig into the art of duo playing. We'll study three songs with guitar and vocals from John Garcia, focusing on what we'll do in that duo setting, utilizing the tools you've learned in our lessons to this point. Videos Include: Acc Study 9 - Introduction: Accompaniment Study 9 Introduction; Approach to Duo Playing; Acc Study 9 - Study Song 1: Baby What You Want Me To Do: Baby What You Want Me To Do - First Listen, Part 1; Baby What You Want Me To Do - Opening & Verses; Baby What You Want Me To Do - Full Playing Example; Baby What You Want Me To Do - First Listen, Part 2; Acc Study 9 - Study Song 2: How Long Blues: How Long - First Listen; How Long - Chord Identification; How Long - Roots & Fifths; How Long - 3rds & Flat-7ths; How Long - Arpeggios; How Long - 2nd Position Approach, Part 1; How Long - 2nd Position Approach, Part 2; How Long - 1st and 3rd Position; Acc Study 9 - Study Song 3: She's My Baby; She’s My Baby, Part 1; She’s My Baby, Part 2; Accompaniment Study 9 Closing

    Accompaniment Study 10
    Join me for our final lesson on accompaniment playing where we take Monster Mike Welch's CD "Cryin' Hey!" and dissect it for how we can approach playing harp on it. This lesson is for Advances skill level players and you'll need your entire set of harmonica, including your Chromatic. Videos Include: Accompaniment Study 10 Introduction; All the Love in the World: Cryin’ Hey, Part 1; Cryin’ Hey - Part 2; Cryin’ Hey - Part 3; A Thrill to be Alive - Part 1; A Thrill to be Alive - Part 2; Joaquin Riley; My Father’s Son; They Call Me Monster Mike - Part 1; They Call Me Monster Mike - Part 2; Everybody; One of Those Days - Part 1; One of Those Days - Part 2; Searching for an Angel; Just Like a Fool; Give Me Time; Acc Study 10 - Gary Smith's Approach: All The Love in the Word, Part 1 (From Submission 40); All The Love in the Word, Part 2 (Sub 40); Cryin’ Hey, Part 1 (Sub 40); Cryin’ Hey, Part 2 (Sub 40); A Thrill To Be Alive (Sub 41); Joaquin Riley (Sub 41); My Father’s Son (Sub 41); They Call Me Monster Mike (Sub 41); Everybody (Sub 41); One of the Those Days, Part 1 (Sub 42); One of the Those Days, Part 2 (Sub 42); One of the Those Days, Part 3 (Sub 42); Searching for an Angel, Part 1 (Sub 42); Just Like a Fool (Sub 42); Give Me Time and Closing Comments (Sub 42); Accompaniment Study 10 Closing

    Rhythm Training
    Rhythm training is already part of your lessons at BluesHarmonica.com, very specifically contained in your Bending and Tongue Blocking study songs. If you would like to dig deeper into the meaning of the rhythm notation used in your sheet music, or are having difficulty with a particular passage within a song you're studying and would like the notated rhythms to help you dial it in, then you're in the right place. We'll also spend time on how to better feel the beat and use a metronome. This lesson is for all skill level players and does not require a harmonica. Videos Include: Section 1 - Introduction to Rhythm Training: Rhythm Training Introduction; Feeling the Beat: Sway and Tapping Feet; Setting Beat 1 on the Metronome; Music Notation Basics: Section 2 - Rhythm Training; Example 1 - Whole Notes; Example 2 - Half Notes; Example 3 - Quarter Notes; Example 4 - Eighth Notes; Example 5 - Syncopated Eighth Notes; Example 6 - Triplets; Example 7 - Swing Eighths; Example 8 - Sixteenth Notes; Example 9 - Tied Rhythms; Example 10 - Dotted Values; Example 11 - Staccato; Example 12 - Accents; Example 13 - Triplet Quarters; Example 14 - Ritard & Fermata; Rhythm Training Closing

    Recording Study 1 - Handheld
    In this study we look at the value of quick handheld recording (smartphone and portable digital recorder) for both self-assessment and submission of your work to me. This study is for all skill level players and no harmonicas are needed for this study. Lessons include: Section 1 – Introduction to Handheld Recording: Handheld Recording; Section 2 – Smartphone Recording: Recording with a Smartphone; Listening to your Recording for Self-Assessment; Transferring your Recording to your Computer; Submitting Recording for Feedback; Section 3 – Portable Digital Recording Devices: Portable Digital Recording; Section 4 – Closing to Handheld Recording: Closing to Handheld Recording

    Recording Study 2 - Software
    In this study we look at software recording. I'll be using Garage Band, but the principles taught in this lesson will help you with whichever computer program you use for multi-track recording. This study is for all skill level players and no harmonicas are needed for this study. Videos include: Introduction to Software Recording; Setup to Software Recording; Reference Recording; Recording; Editing and Exporting; Closing to Software Recording

    Recording Study 3 - Home Studio
    In this lesson I'll show you how to record acoustic harmonica, mic a harp amp, do punch-in recording and edit multiple takes into one cohesive track. Many of the techniques I'll share with you are common to professional recording studios, just on a smaller scale. As a bonus, you get to follow fellow student Bill Bussell as he records his current study song ("The Tub"). This study is for all skill level players and no harmonicas are needed. Videos include: Section 1 – Introduction to Home Studio Recording: Introduction and Purpose of Recording; Section 2 – Home Studio: Recording Setup; Components and Mics; Mic Placement; Amp Setup; Pro Tools Setup, Part 1; Pro Tools Setup, Part 2; Section 3 – Recording Tracks with Bill Bussell: Recording Tracks with Bill; Editing Bill’s Recording, Part 1; Editing Bill’s Recording, Part 2; Editing Bill’s Recording, Part 3

    Recording Study 4 - Professional Studio
    Your lesson begins with an overview of what's involved in recording at a studio and then we cover a bullet-point list of what's needed to prepare for the process. In Section 2 we sit down with students Joel Saal and George Bisharat and listen to their recording process. George has provided you a song from his new CD. If you would like to pickup his entire project visit http://www.bigharpgeorge.com for links to iTunes, Amazon, Bluebeat, and CD Baby. Thanks to Joel and George for their time. In Section 3 Aki Kumar and Gary Smith share their recording experiences and how they would like to approach this project. We also rehearse our harmony tunes and I provide you with scratch tracks and charts to play along with us. In Section 4 master blues guitarist and recording engineer Kid Anderson shares tips with us on how to achieve a great sound in the studio for blues harmonica. I'm now releasing Section 5 footage (one video a week. as it's edited) of the actual studio recording session. Thanks to volunteer cameramen Marc Graci, Gleidson Sousa and John Rafferty.

    REPERTOIRE BUILDERS

    Repertoire Builder Study 2.5
    This Repertoire Builder song "Take It Easy Now" does not teach you any new techniques, but places into context what you've worked hard to learn in Bending and Tongue Blocking Studies 2. This song will continue to work these techniques along with giving you a fun song to play that contains valuable lick vocabulary for your improvising down the road. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need a C Harmonica for this study. Videos include: Section 1 - Technique Review: Introduction to Lesson; Bending on the C Harmonica; Bending in Context (Bending Down & Dips); Tongue Block Review (Slaps & Flutter); How to Practice a Lick - Part 1; How to Practice a Lick - Part 2; Section 2 - "Take It Easy Now" Repertoire Builder Song: Chorus 1 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 2 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 3 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 4 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 5 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 6 - Take It Easy Now; Chorus 7 - Take It Easy Now; Section 3 - How to Play with a Band & Closing Thoughts; How to Play with a Band & Closing

    Repertoire Builder Study 1.5
    I know that folk songs have nothing to do with playing blues, but they provide a great opportunity to develop skill on your instrument via simple melodies that you’re already familiar with (you can focus on movement and breathing since you already know the rhythm and melody).

    ARTIST STUDIES - Unlocked by participating in the Levels of Achievement Program

    William Clarke
    William Clarke was one of the greatest blues harmonica players of all time. In this artist study we'll dig into his slow blues "Lonesome Bedroom Blues" from his Live Bootleg Cassette Anthology. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a C Harmonica for this study.


    Jerry Portnoy
    Jerry Portnoy is one of the great classic blues harmonica stylists. Jerry is best known for his work with both Muddy Waters and Eric Clapton. In this artist study we'll dig into his slow blues "Blues for Big Nate" from the release Red Hot & Blues, The Legendary Blues Band. This study is for intermediate skill level players (though the opening chorus is doable for the beginning player). You'll need an A Harmonica for this study.

    Gary Smith
    Gary Smith is one of the great classic blues harmonica stylists in the San Francisco Bay Area. We have a full interview with Gary at bluesharmonica.com, so make sure to check that out. In this Artist Study we dig into his great harmonica instrumental "Minor Mambo." This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a C Harmonica for this study.


    James Harman
    James Harman is one of our great multi-instrumentalists and songwriters of today. In his instrumental "Skeet-A-Little Taste" James gives us a fun taste of playing the Low-F Harmonica in a super-cool shuffle groove. Bending and tongue blocking are at a minimal speed, so this is a perfect study for our intermediate players.


    Steve Guyger
    Join me for an artist study of tone monster Steve Guyger with his instrumental "Snake Oil." An added bonus is that this instrumental is minor and played in 2nd Position.


    Little Walter - Phrasing
    Join me for a study of one of the four great post war Chicago blues fathers, Little Walter. In this lesson we dig into his hugely influential approach to phrasing. Most of the licks used in the study song "Walter's Mood" are Little Walter's, providing you with great vocabulary for you to study and draw upon for your own improvising. You may record yourself playing to the provided jam track and submit it to me for review if you wish. This study is for advanced skill level players. Videos include: Introduction; Little Walter's Approach to Phrasing; Chorus 1 - Walter's Mood; Chorus 2 - Walter's Mood; Chorus 3 - Walter's Mood; Chorus 4 - Walter's Mood; Chorus 5 - Walter's Mood; Chorus 6 - Walter's Mood; Closing Thoughts

    Sonny Boy Williamson II (Rice Miller) Artist Study - Chording
    Join me for a study of one of the four great post war Chicago blues fathers, Rice Miller (Sonny Boy Williamson II). In this lesson we dig into his hugely influential approach to chording. Almost all of the licks used in the study song "Sonny's Bird" are Rice Miller's, providing you with great vocabulary for you to study and draw upon for your own solo harmonica playing. You may record yourself and submit it to me for review if you wish. This study is for intermediate skill level players. You'll need the Low F Harmonica for this study. Videos Include: Introduction; Technique (Pull-Slap); Chorus 1 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 2 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 3 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 4 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 5 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 6 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 7 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 8 - Sonny's Bird; Chorus 9 - Sonny's Bird; Choruses 10 and 11 - Sonny's Bird; Performance Thoughts for "Sonny's Bird"; Closing

    Big Walter Horton Artist Study - Shuffle
    Join me for a study of one of our four great post war Chicago blues fathers, Big Walter Horton. In this lesson we dig into what Big Walter Horton is really known for. his killer shuffles. All of the licks used in the study song "Shakey's Shuffle" come from Big Walter, providing you with great vocabulary for you to study and draw upon for your own improvising. You may record yourself playing to the provided jam track and submit it to me for review if you wish. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need an A Harmonicas for this study. Videos include: Introduction; The Writing Process of Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 1 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 2 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 3 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 4 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 5 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 6 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 7 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 8 - Shakey's Shuffle; Chorus 9 - Shakey's Shuffle; How to Play Shakey's Shuffle with a Band; Closing Thoughts

    Andy Just Artist Study - Shuffle
    Andy Just is one of the great rockin' blues harmonica players in the San Francisco Bay Area. We have a full interview with Andy at bluesharmonica.com, so make sure to check that out. In this Artist Study we dig into "Misery," a great shuffle in the key of A that really showcases his rockin'-fast style. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need a D Harmonica for this study. Videos: Introduction to Andy Just Artist Study; Head to "Misery"; Solo, Chorus 1 "Misery"; Solo, Chorus 2 "Misery"; Call & Response "Misery"; Final Chorus (Head) "Misery"; How to Play "Misery" with a Band; Andy Just Artist Study Closing

    George "Harmonica" Smith Artist Study - Swing Chromatic
    Join me for a study of one of our four great post war Chicago Blues fathers, George "Harmonica" Smith. It's generally accepted that George was the greatest Blues chromatic harmonica player of his time, and that's what our focus is for this lesson. The majority of the licks used in the study song "Swingin' with George" comes from George Smith, providing you with great vocabulary for you to study and draw upon for your own improvising. You may record yourself playing to the provided jam track and submit it to me for review if you wish. This study is for advanced skill level players. You'll need the C Chromatic (12 or 16-hole) for this study. Videos include: Introduction to Swingin' with George; About George Smith; Technique for Swingin' with George; Chorus 1 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 2 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 3 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 4 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 5 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 6 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 7 - Swingin' with George; Chorus 8 - Swingin' with George; How to Play Swingin' with George with a Band; Closing

    EQUIPMENT

    Harp Tech Studies 1 - Getting to Know Your Harmonica
    In our first study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard, aka The HarpSmith, will walk you through the different components of the standard diatonic harmonica. He'll also present the differences in material and construction between manufacturers as well as custom component options available in the marketplace. This lesson video is for all skill level players. No tools are required for this lesson. Lesson includes: Introduction to Kinya Pollard, Opening, Basic Harmonica Construction, Cover Plate Options, Comb Options - Part 1, Comb Options - Part 2, Temperment (Tuning) and Closing

    Harp Tech Study 2 - Maintenance & Tools
    In our second study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard (aka The HarpSmith) walks you through the tools used for tuning and adjusting your harmonicas. Kinya demonstrates tools currently available through harmonica manufacturers as well as some specialized tools made by third parties. Kinya also walks you through proper lighting for your shop as well as the magnification needed to work with the small parts found on our harmonicas. Lastly Kinya shares with you different cleaning methods for keeping your harmonicas in pristine shape. Videos include: Introduction; Lee Oskar Tool Kit; Herring Tool Kit; Hohner Tool Kit; Final thoughts on Tool Kits; Introduction to Cleaning; Cleaning Basics; Ultrasonic Cleaner - Plates on Harp; Ultrasonic Cleaner - Plates off Harp; Cleaning Cover Plates; Lighting; Magnification

    Harp Tech Study 3 - Tuning
    In our third study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard (aka The HarpSmith) walks you through the fine art of tuning on the harmonica. Videos include: Introduction, iPhone Tuners, Analog Tuners, Peterson Tuners, Tuning on plates intro, Isolating the reed and where to take off metal, Three ways to tune, Raising the pitch of a reed and using the Tuning Table, Draw reed tuning on Tuning Table, Draw scraper tuning tool, Tuning off the comb, Tuning off the comb with Special 20, More Richard Sleigh tools, Temperment, Point 1 - Embouchure and tuning, Point 2 - Can a harmonica be out of tune right out of the box. Point 3 - How many times can you tune. Point 4 - How condensation affects tuning, Closing

    Harp Tech Study 4 - Reed Gapping
    In our fourth study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard (aka The HarpSmith) walks you through the fine art of reed gapping on the harmonica. This lesson video is for all skill level players. Videos Include: Introduction to Reed Gapping; Getting Started with Reed Gapping; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Increasing the Gap; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Decreasing the Gap; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Documentation; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Reed Symbiosis; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Hearing a Gap Too Large; Reed Gapping, Level 1: Hearing a Gap Too Small; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Method 2; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Method 3; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Method 4; Reed Gapping - Level 1: Closing Comments; Reed Gapping - Level 2: Clearance at the Rivet End; Reed Gapping - Level 2: Setting the Zero-Point All at Once; Reed Gapping - Level 2: Setting the Zero-Point with One Reed; Reed Gapping - Level 2: Light Box Intro; Reed Gapping - Level 2: Using Light Box to Adjust How Reeds Enter the Slot; Using CD Security Strip as Feeler Gauge; Reed Gapping Closing Words

    Harp Tech Study 5 - Reed Replacement
    In our fifth study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard (aka The HarpSmith) walks you through how to change reeds on the harmonica. This lesson video is for all skill level players. Videos included: Introduction to Reed Replacement; Why Replace a Reed?; Identifying a Bad Reed; Finding a Donor Reed; Reed Remouval - Method 1; Reed Remouval - Methods 2 and 3; Preparing the Reed Plate and Tapping - Method 1; Preparing the Reed Plate and Tapping - Method 2; Preparing the Reed Plate and Tapping - Method 3; Preparing the Reed Plate - Level 2: Setting up a Work Station; Preparing the Reed - Level 1: Wood Block and Hand Drill; Preparing the Reed - Level 2: Hand Vice; Installing the Reed; Reed Alignment and Cutting Bolt; Sanding Reed Plate Pad Area; Reed Replacement Closing Words

    Harp Tech Study 6 - Reed Slot Sizing
    In our sixth study harp tech expert Kinya Pollard (aka The HarpSmith) walks you through how to size a reed slot on the harmonica. This lesson video is for all skill level players. Videos include: Introduction to Reed Slot Sizing; Principals of Reed Slot Sizing; Reed Slot Sizing with UST (Ultimate Sizing Tool); Reed Slot Sizing with UST and Light Box; Fixing the Reed Slot if You Go Too Far; Tip Scooping; Adjusting the Reed’s Profile after Reed Slot Sizing; Reed Slot Sizing Closing Words

    Bill Bucco Interview - Hohner Diatonic Service Tech
    Join me for an informative interview with Bill Bucco, the diatonic harmonica service technician for Hohner Harmonicas. In this interview we cover what a normal day at the Hohner Service Center looks like, common repairs and how to care for your diatonic harmonicas. Videos include: Getting to know Bill Bucco, Tell us about read failure and gapping, What causes a reed to buzz. What type of maintenance should we do on our diatonic harmonicas? What type of services does Hohner offer. Why are there different models of diatonic harmonica and why are their different temperaments. Closing.

    Interview with Harmonica Customizer Joe Spiers
    Join me for an interview with respected blues harmonica player and customizer Joe Spiers. In this interview we speak of what's commonly done to a harmonica to make it play better, the levels of customization and the "do's and "dont's" of playing a finely adjusted instrument. Joe also speaks of being certified by Joe Filisko through the HOHNER AFFILIATED CUSTOMIZERS PROGRAM. This interview was held in August of 2012 in Dallas, Texas. Videos Include: Introduction to Joe Spiers; What Makes a Good Playing Harmonica, Part 1; What Makes a Good Playing Harmonica, Part 2; Tuning Stability and Double-Thick Reedplates; How to Care for a Custom Harmonica; Levels of Harmonica Customization; Hohner Affiliated Customizer Program and Closing

    Sissi Jones Interview – Hohner Chromatic Service Tech
    Join me for an informative interview with Sissi Jones, the chromatic harmonica service technician for Hohner Harmonicas. In this interview we cover what a normal day at the Hohner Service Center looks like, common repairs, how to care for your chromatic harmonica and how to deal with sticky slides and wind savers.

    Interview with Tuning Table Inventor Rick Trankle
    Join me for an interview with the inventor of the Tuning Table. In this video Rick shares with us the reasons for its invention and how to use this tool.

    Alternate Tunings with Brendan Power
    Join me and Brendan Power for a discussion and examples of different tunings for the diatonic harmonica. Brendan also covers his new POWER tuning system (PowerBlow, PowerDraw and PowerBender).


    Amps - What You Need to Know
    In this video lesson you'll learn the important elements of choosing, setting up and using an amplifier. We'll cover: amp choice (small, medium & large); adding delay and/reverb; mic choice (which mic is appropriate for which amp); common tube subs; setting your amp up on the stage; and finaly how to dial in your volume settings.

    Amps - Amp Tone Settings
    In this video lesson you'll learn how to dial in the tone settings on various amp sizes and ages.


    Interview with Amp Tech Dale Laslie of MegaTone Amps
    Join me for an interview with leading harmonica amp repairman, customizer and manufacturer Dale Laslie, founder and CEO of DJL Vintage Audio and designer of the MegaTone Amp line. In this interview Dale defines the role of each element in the tone chain and discusses how these can be changed to maximize their potential for the harp. Co-designer Mike Wezolowski of the MegaTone WEZO-45 also shares with us the story of the building of this amp.

    Mics - What You Need To Know
    In this video lesson you'll learn about the most common blues harmonica microphone bodies, elements and output connectors. Also included is an audio recording test of the microphones shown in the videos.


    Mics – Interview with Fritz Hasenpusch “The Harp Mic Man”
    Fritz Hasenpusch "The Harp Mic Man" has been a leading expert in the harp mic world for over 20 years. In this interview we'll dig into the most common questions asked by harmonica players. Make sure to visit his other lesson videos in the equipment section of the website. Videos on: Welcome and getting to know Fritz, What are your customers' most common desires. What is impedance. Different between Shure CM and CR's, What common disinformation is out there. Different mic sizes that can work for harp - Part 1, Different mic sizes that can work for harp - Part 2, Does the body of the microphone influence the sound. What are the most common mic repairs. What are the most common mic mods - Part 1, What are the most common mic mods - Part 2, Does the cable influence the sound. Output connectors, What's a nightmare customer for you. What's your preffered customer. What mic combination do you commonly recommend? & Closing

    Elements
    The Microphone Element (also known as the Cartridge or Capsule) is the engine that makes a mic work and gives each mic its unique tone. In this video Fritz Hasenpusch "The Harp Mic Man" walks us through the common elements used by harmonica players: crystal (commonly Astatic), controlled magnetic/reluctance (commonly Shure), Dynamic (again, commonly Shure) and Condenser. He'll walk you through the history of development, construction and what microphones they were commonly found in. Videos include: Introduction, Crystal & Ceramic Elements, Controlled Magnetic/Reluctance Elements, Mics where the Crystal, Ceramic, Controlled Magnetic/Reluctance are Found, Dynamic Elements & Microphones, Lapel (Finger) Mics & Interchangeability of Elements

    Microphone Tools & Materials
    In this lesson Fritz Hasenpusch "The Harp Mic Man" shows us the common tools, materials and methods used for working on microphones. Fritz covers: contact cleaner sprays, soldering irons and heatsink, adhesives, multimeters, drivers, gaskets, coatings and output connectors.


    Interview with Harp Mic Tech Greg Heumann
    Join me for an interview with harp mic repairman, customizer and manufacturer Greg Heumann. In this interview he covers: common repairs and mods, unique products that Greg offers, how hand size affects the size of mic chosen, and choice of mic elements.

    Interview with harp mic repairman and customizer Dennis Oellig
    Join me for an interview with harp mic repairman and customizer Dennis Oellig. Videos include: Getting to know Dennis; Common Repairs and Modifications; Custom Mics; The First Call - Education the Customer; Building Custom Mics for Van Morrison and Billy Gibbons; Recommended Mic for Most Players; Elements & Closing

    Amp Comparison
    Looking at all of the choices for amplifiers out there today, both new and vintage, it can be challenging to decide on a rig that meets your needs. At the 2010 San Jose Harmonica Masterclass Workshop we gathered 26 tube amplifiers known for sounding good for the harp and gave them all a taste test. I was joined by tone monsters Gary Smith and Dennis Gruenling. In this test we try small, medium and large amps and speak about some important elements of using them on the bandstand. Below is the list of amps we tested in order of appearance. There are plenty of other great sounding amps that we could have included, but this is what I, the artists and students coming to the class could come up with. no amp was included or excluded for any reason other than this is what we could get our hands on.

    AMPS (Listed in order of appearance)
    Masco, Model: 3311 - Newcomb speaker cabinet, 15" speaker & cone - Jon Harl
    Kalamazoo, Model: 1, 5 watts, 10" speaker - David Barrett
    Kalamazoo, Model: 2, 5 watts, 10" speaker - Jon Harl
    Supro, Model: Chicago 51, 5 watts, 10" speaker - David Barrett
    Epiphone Head & Cab (New) - Speaker changed to Jensen Alnico - Gary Smith
    Kalamazoo (New) - 7 watts, 8" Jensen Alnico - Joseph M. Goforth
    Fender Champ Clone (New) - 5 watts, 8" speaker - Joe Lempkowski
    Fender, Model: Pro Junior, 15 watts, Alnico 10" - Gary Smith
    Fender, Model: Super Champ XD (New), 10" speaker - David Barrett
    Fender, Model: Princeton (1959), 5 watt, 10" Speaker - Mark Overman
    Fender, Model: Princeton Reverb (1967), 12 watts, 10" speaker
    Meteor, Model: Mini Meat, 20 & 30 watts choice, 1x10" & 2x8" speakers - Joe Lempkowski
    Kalamazoo (New), 17 watts, 2x10" alnico - Joseph M. Goforth
    Sonny Junior, Model: 1, 4x8" speakers - Kinya Pollard
    Victoria, Model: Duel Professional (New), 2x10" - Gary Smith
    Fender, Model: Vibroverb (New), 30 watts, 2x10" speakers - David Croall
    Egnator, 0-20 watts, 1x10" & 1x12" Jenson - Gary Smith
    Meteor, 50 watts, 2x10" & 1x12" speakers - Jim Johnson
    MegaTone, Model: WEZO-45, 45 watts, 2x10" & Cabinet 2x12" - David Barrett
    Sonny Jr, Model: Cruncher, 1x12" alnico Weber & 1x8" alnico Weber, 1x8" Ceramic - Gary Smith
    Fender, Model: Bassman, 45 watts, Early 1990's Reissue (Eminance speakers) - Kinya Pollard
    Fender, Model: Bassman, 45 watts, Early 1990's Reissue with vintage P10R speakers - Mark Overman
    Sonny Jr, Model: 4x10, 45 watts, 4x10" speakers - Dennis Low
    Harp King, Model 4x10, 70 Watts, 4x10" speakers - Mark Overman
    Harp King, Model 6x10, 100 Watts, 6x10" speakers - Mark Overman
    Fender, Model: Super Reverb, 75 watts, 4x10" (Paul Butterfield's actual amp!) - Kinya Pollard

    Bassman Chronicles
    The 1959 Fender Bassman Amplifier has been the standard for gigging blues harmonica players since we've had to deal with loud bands in the 1960's. Priced around

    $10,000, the originals are now collectors items and are no longer practical options. The 1959 Fender Reissue Bassman (originally released in 1990), though not the most friendly amplifier to play stock, can be purchased for a very reasonable price in the used market (

    $700) and with some tube changes it can sound fantastic. The new LTD gets closer to the common modifications used by customizers (tube rectifier, shellacked pine cabinet and adjustable bias pot. though the speakers are less desirable than the 1990's models) and can be purchased at most music stores. With the help of my student and friend Mark Overman, artists such as Mark Hummel and Gary Smith and amp experts like Skip Simmons and Dale Laslie, this ongoing series is dedicated to chronicling the complete story of how to purchase, modify, setup and perform with the 1959 Fender Bassman Reissue Amplifier. - Submission #1 - Introduction to the Bassman Chronicles, Part 1
    - Submission #1 - Introduction to the Bassman Chronicles, Part 2
    - Submission #1 - Qualities of a Good Sounding Amp, Part 1
    - Submission #1 - Qualities of a Good Sounding Amp, Part 2
    - Submission #1 - Why Choose the Fender Bassman?
    - Submission #1 - History and Construction of the 1959 Fender Bassman Reissue
    - Submission #2 - 1990 Bassman Journey
    - Submission #2 - Comparing Stock 1990 Bassman & Fully Modded 1990 Bassman
    - Submission #2 - Bridging Channels 1 & 2
    - Submission #2 - Tube Values
    - Submission #2 - Changing Tubes on 1990 Bassman, Part 1
    - Submission #2 - Changing Tubes on 1990 Bassman, Part 2
    - Submission #2 - Before & After Tube Changes
    - Submission #2 - Comparing 1990 Bassman with Tube Changes & Fully Modded 1990 Bassman
    - Submission #3 - 1990 Bassman Hits the Bandstand, Part 1
    - Submission #3 - 1990 Bassman Hits the Bandstand, Part 2
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Introduction
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Shure CM and CR Elements
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Shure & Astatic Crystal and Ceramic Elements, Part 1
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Shure & Astatic Crystal and Ceramic Elements, Part 2
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Impedance Matching
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Kinder Anti-Feedback+
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: All Mics Compared
    - Submission #4 - Mics & The Bassman: Final Thoughts
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Introduction
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Cabinet
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Speakers
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Tubes
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Prefered Mics
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Why the Bassman?
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Bias Pot & Circuit Longevity
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Cost
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Stage Placement
    - Submission #5 - Gary Smith's Bassman: Effects & Closing
    - Submission #6 - Amp Setup Night at the Dell: Intro
    - Submission #6 - Amp Setup Night at the Dell: Part 1
    - Submission #6 - Amp Setup Night at the Dell: Part 2
    - Submission #7 - Amp Setup Night at the Dell: Comments, Part 1
    - Submission #7 - Amp Setup Night at the Dell: Comments, Part 2
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Intro
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 1
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 2
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 3
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 4
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 5
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 6
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Part 7
    - Submission #8 - Amp Setup Night: Tester Comments, Closing
    - Submission #9 - Bassman LTD, Part 1
    - Submission #9 - Bassman LTD, Part 2
    - Submission #10 - Finish
    - Submission #10 - Resistor Change and Bias Intro
    - Submission #10 - Hearing Bias Change
    - Submission #10 - Using Bias Meter
    - Submission #10 - Closing

    Masco Chronicles
    Join Mark Overman and myself as we present this series covering the usage of vintage P.A. heads for amplified blues harmonica playing. Our series starts with Mark and I covering the spectrum of information regarding the use of PA heads for harp, including vintage, wattage and playing examples of different models. In our second submission we take a visit to the innovator of P.A. head customization, Skip Simmons. In that submission Mark and Skip take you on a tour of Skip's vast warehouse of vintage gear. The third submission I interview Skip Simmons. In the fourth submission Mark visits the collection of Jack Sugrue. And in our last submission Mark and I sit down and talk about speaker and cabinet options.
    - Submission #1 – Introducing Mark Overman & Why Masco
    - Submission #1 – Tone & Application
    - Submission #1 – Age & Power Rating
    - Submission #1 – Looking Inside the Masco
    - Submission #1 – Speaker Types & Microphones
    - Submission #1 – Playing the Low-Wattage Heads
    - Submission #1 – Playing the Higher Wattage Heads
    - Submission #1 – Closing Comments
    - Submission #2 – Skip Simmons Warehouse Tour, Part 1
    - Submission #2 – Skip Simmons Warehouse Tour, Part 2
    - Submission #2 – Skip Simmons Warehouse Tour, Part 3
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 1
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 2
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 3
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 4
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 5
    - Submission #3 – Skip Simmons Interview, Part 6
    - Submission #4 – Jack Sugrue Collection, Part 1
    - Submission #4 – Jack Sugrue Collection, Part 2
    - Submission #4 – Jack Sugrue Collection, Part 3
    - Submission #5 – Speakers, Part 1
    - Submission #5 – Speakers, Part 2
    - Submission #5 – Cabinets, Part 1
    - Submission #5 – Cabinets, Part 2
    - Submission #5 – Cabinets, Part 3
    - Submission #5 – Breaking in Speakers
    - Submission #5 – Cabinet Sizes
    - Submission #5 – Playing the Cabinets
    - Submission #5 – Closing to Masco Chronicles Series

    Effects Processors - Reverb

    Reverb is one of the most common effects used by harmonica players (Delay being the other). In this video we'll cover common settings and how pro players set theirs up.

    Effects Processors - Delay
    Delay is one of the most common effects used by harmonica players (Reverb being the other). In this video we'll cover common settings and how pro players set theirs up.

    Learning Aids - Metronome
    The metronome is a valuable tool in developing good rhythm. In this video I'll share the basics of using a metronome as well as some special features that can be very helpful in your studies.

    Learning Aids - Chromatic Tuner
    In this video we'll cover different ways in which you can use devices (piano, tuner, metronome, etc.) to help you dial in the pitch of your bends. Visit the support material listing of any Bending Study lesson page for a notation chart that shows all of the bends available for each key of harmonica.


    Software - Recording (GarageBand)
    GarageBand is an intuitive recording program that comes preinstalled on Mac computers. In these videos you'll learn how to record yourself playing a study song for submission at BluesHarmonica.com. Studies include: importing a BluesHarmonica.com study song jam track into GarageBand as a backing track; recording a harmonica track; mixing and exporting as an MP3 for submission.

    Software - Recording (Audacity & Music Creator)
    A key element of education at BluesHarmonica.com is the study songs I have written for you. When completing your study send me a recording of you playing to the provided jam track on the site. For Mac users there's a lesson on how to use GarageBand. For our PC users here's a quick lesson on how to use Music Creator and Audacity, two inexpensive programs (Audacity is free) for the PC.

    Software - Practice Tools (the Amazing Slow Downer)
    The Amazing Slow Downer is a highly effective learning tool for studying recorded music. With the Amazing Slowdowner you can: play music from a CD or digital file; slow it down (without changing the pitch or key of a song); change the key (without affecting the tempo); loop a section of a song or a specific lick to repeat continuously and save any variation of these changes to a music file for listening on a digital music device or for burning to a CD. You will learn how to do all of this in this video series as well as some insight on how you can best use this program for your studies.

    Software - Playing & Organizing Music (iTunes)
    iTunes is the most common music player and software system in the world for organizing your digital music. In this lesson you'll learn how to: take study songs from BluesHarmonica.com and place them into your iTunes library; load songs into your iTunes library from a CD; create playlists and organize your music so that it's very searchable.

    Harmonicas - German Harmonica Museum Documentary
    The German Harmonica & Accordion Museum is located in Trossingen, Germany. the epicenter of centuries of harmonica production. This unique look at the town, the museum's displays (over 25,000 unique harmonicas) and a fascinating interview with Martin Häffner, make this a great journey into the harmonica’s past. http://www.harmonika-museum.de/. Video include: Museum Tour: Part 1, Museum Tour: Part 2, Interview with Museum Director: The Early Days, About the Building, Displays and Exhibits, Harmonica History, Trouble in the 1980’s, The Affect of the War Years, Harmonica Pricing & History of the Marine Band

    Harmonica Recording Techniques by John Shirley
    Part 1 - This video offers audio demonstrations of various microphone types and mic placements for recording both acoustic and amplified harmonica. It also outlines issues of audio interference (comb filtering) when combining multiple signals from the same source and provides examples of the use of Direct Injects and Line Outs. Part 2 - This video compares microphone placements on an amp, then combining them in various ways. Also covered are: stereo treatments, direct injects and line outs, virtual amps (through pedals and rack processors, computer software… even smart phone apps) as well as the influence of phase and polarity between signals.

    PERFORMANCE TRAINING


    Performance Training Study 1 - Beginnings, Endings & Breaks
    In this video lesson you'll learn all of the common ways to open songs, use breaks within a song and end songs. Whether you're following a bandleader's instructions or giving them yourself, you'll have the tools to be confident when working with others. Thanks to student Richard Gilman for joining us in this lesson.

    Performance Training Study 2 - Groove
    Join me and a group of the most experienced harmonica-backing blues musicians on the planet for a lesson on Grooves. Our band for this lesson is Rusty Zinn (guitar), RW Grigsby (bass) and Marty Dodson (drums). In this study we cover all the common grooves played in blues: Shuffle, Double Shuffle, T-Bone Shuffle, Jimmy Reed Shuffle, Backwards Shuffle, Chicago Shuffle, Floater (Shuffle), Box (Shuffle), Lump (Shuffle), Flat Tire, Swing, Two Beat, Mojo Beat (Two Beat), Train Beat (Two Beat), Rock Beat, Funk, Tramp, Slow Blues, Rhumba, Modal, and more! Understanding the names of grooves and how to explain each instrument's role is paramount in being a good bandleader, accompanist and song writer.

    Performance Training Study 3 - Discussions with a Blues Band
    Join me, Rusty Zinn (guitar), RW Grigsby (bass) and Marty Dodson (drums) for a discussion about playing with harmonica players. This is an inside look at what it takes to be a great bandleader. Videos include: When a harmonica player comes up to play with you, what directions do you want to hear? Part 1; When a harmonica player comes up to play with you, what directions do you want to hear? Part 2; Where do you feel harmonica players are deficient?; Discussions on the volume of the harmonica and tone on the bandstand; Players they feel we should check out; Dealing with a loud band and harmonica amp setup; Three suggestions from each musician of areas harmonica players can work on

    Performance Training Study 4 - The Jam Session
    In this Performance Training lesson I'll help prepare you for success at a Jam Session. Jam sessions can be very challenging, but they provide a valuable opportunity to gain stage experience, meet like-minded musicians and try new material. No harmonicas are needed for this lesson, but download the PDF to reference as we go through the points in this lesson. This lesson is for all skill level players, but is generally focused on intermediate players. Videos Include: Section 1 - Preparing for the Jam Session: Jam Session Training Introduction; The Purpose of a Jam Session; Three Types of Jam Sessions; What To Expect at a Jam Session; Song Selection for a Jam Session; Section 2 - At the Jam Session: Sitting in at a Jam Session; Leading a Song at a Jam Session, Part 1 – Your Speech and Count-In; Leading a Song at a Jam Session, Part 2 – Handing off Solos; Leading a Song at a Jam Session, Part 3 – Ending the Song; Leading a Song at a Jam Session, Part 4 – When You Mess Up; Section 3 - Jam Session Equipment: What Harmonicas to Bring to a Jam Session; Using the Provided Equipment at a Jam Session; Using Your Own Equipment at a Jam Session; Mixer Basics; Value of Recording Yourself & Standards List; Jam Session Training Closing; Section 4 - Student Jam Session Experience: John Rafferty's Jam Session Experiences; Dave Tauber's Jam Session Experiences

    Performance Training Study 5 - Joining or Starting a Blues Band
    In this Performance Training study I'll help prepare you for the process of joining an existing blues band or starting your own. No harmonicas are needed for this lesson, but download the PDF to reference as we go through the points in this lesson. This lesson is for all skill level players, but is generally focused towards upper-intermediate and advanced players. Videos include: Section 1 – Joining a Blues Band: Joining or Starting a Blues Band Introduction; Checking out the Band; Learning their Material; Section 2 – Starting a Blues Band: Selecting Musicians; Sharing Responsibilities; Song Selection, Contracts and Promotion; Joining or Starting a Blues Band Closing; Section 3 – Student Band Experiences: John Rafferty's Band Experience; Dave Tauber's Band Experience

    Performance Training Study 7 - Mastering the Bandstand
    Performing on the stage is the ultimate context for the studying musician. In this video lesson we (David Barrett, Dennis Gruenling, Rod Piazza & Joe Filisko) cover the many elements involved in live performance, from setting up so you can hear yourself to how to make a lasting impression on the audience. Videos include: How to set up to hear yourself on the bandstand; How to deal with a loud band; The importance of dynamics; Tools to use when working with a pickup band; Why harmonica players use positions in a performance; Should you play harp every song?; What our panel wants to hear when we're listening to another harmonica live; The panel plays!

    INTERVIEWS

    Gary Smith is regarded as one of the fathers of Blues Harmonica in the San Jose/San Francisco Bay Area. Gary had an active band as early as the late 1960’s, recording his first record in 1972 and playing the first note at first San Francisco Blues Festival in 1973… now the longest continuously running blues festival in the United States. Gary has mentored countless harmonica players and band members over the years, including myself 21 years ago. I was 16 at that time and everything he taught me left a huge impression on my playing. It’s very difficult to find a mentor… on the harmonica and everything that’s embodied in the music we love to play… the blues. I was very fortunate to have a blues harmonica father like Gary and for that reason he was a large part of why I teach today… it gives me great pleasure to provide that same type of mentoring to my students. It’s hard to think of any harp player with a bigger tone and presence on the bandstand than Gary. He’s also a master of mixing blues harmonica influences… most prominently Little Walter, James Cotton, Junior Wells and Paul Butterfield. I enjoy listening to him because of his no-nonsense, traditional playing style with an abundance of new ways of mixing classic lines with fresh new ideas… all staying true to the classic Chicago Blues style. Videos included: Introduction and early influences, Essential listening, History of the bandstand 1, History of the bandstand 2, Approach to improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Tongue blocking, Bending, 1st position playing and recommended listening, 3rd position playing and recommended listening, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Minor playing, High-end playing, Understanding the structure of 12-bar and non-12 bar blues, Equipment 1, Equipment 2, Personal philosophy, What do you like to hear when you listen to harmonica? & Closing

    Gary Primich. blues harmonica player, vocalist and songwriter was born in Chicago in 1958 and was raised in an industrial suburb of Gary Indiana. Gary picked up the harmonica in his teens and often frequented clubs in the West and South sides of Chicago, soon playing with bands on Maxwell Street. Big Walter Horton was an important early influence on his playing along with the other blues harp players on the scene in Chicago at the time. After college Gary moved to his current city of residence, Austin Texas. Gary has released eight major albums under his own name as well as guesting on numerous other albums with artists such as Omar & The Howlers and Steve James. My first exposure to Gary’s work was with his 1995 recording “Mr. Freeze” on Flying Fish Records. What immediately struck me about Gary’s playing was his ability to perform harp parts that intertwined with the essence of every song. After listening to each song I found myself thinking that I wouldn’t have played that song any differently. His selection of grooves and well-written hooks make Gary’s recordings some of my favorite to listen to from start to finish. Focusing in on his playing a little more… though he’s a solid classic Chicago blues player, I also appreciate in Gary his level of sophistication, especially on the more jazz-focused songs. His knowledge of chords and form shine in his fluid solos. We’ll hear Gary speak about this in our interview. Videos include: Introduction, early influences and essential listening, Importance of studying the masters, Approach to improvising, Recommendations for students regarding improvising, Tongue blocking, Bending, Blow bending, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, How to approach non-twelve bar blues, 3rd position playing and recommended listening, 1st position playing and recommended listening, Playing positions over chord changes, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Minor playing, High-end playing, Approach to accompaniment playing, Equipment, Personal philosophy, What do you like to hear when you listen to harmonica? & Closing

    Dennis Gruenling is easily one of my favorite blues harmonica players in today’s music scene. Dennis mixes classic post war Chicago blues harmonica with 1940’s era jump and swing blues, all that packaged together with great traditional technique as well as modern technique, such as his tasteful integration of overbends into his blues playing. Dennis has played with Snooky Prior and Pinetop Perkins to name but a few of the classic players he’s worked with. As one of today’s top players he regularly participates in harmonica blowouts, most notably with Mark Hummel’s touring show. Dennis’ first CD released in 1999, titled Dennis Gruenling & Jump Time. Up All Night and That’s Right releasing soon after that, with his most recent release being a Little Walter Tribute Album featuring Kim Wilson, Rick Estrin and Steve Guyger. Along with a busy gigging and recording schedule, Dennis has a large private teaching load, including both in-person lessons and online lessons. Dennis regularly teaches at the major harmonica events around the world… in fact this interview was conducted the day after one of my large Harmonica Masterclass Workshops. It’s very rare to find such a high-level player that’s also a great educator… I’m proud to present him to you on bluesharmonica.com This interview was conducted June 16th, 2008 at School of the Blues in San Jose California. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Essential listening, Obscure players worth checking out, Approach to improvising, Prepare students for the bandstand, Keeping solos fresh throughout a performance, Approach to accompaniment playing, Tongue blocking, Bending, Blow bending, Recommendations for playing on low harps, Overbending, Overbending example, Recommended players to listen to for overbending, 1st position playing and recommended listening, 3rd position playing, Recommended players to listen to for 3rd position, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Other positions, Playing towards the strengths of the harmonica, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Minor playing, Equipment, Cupping, Personal philosophy & Closing

    UK-based New Zealander Brendan Power has been a heavy-hitter of the harmonica world for decades. He’s worked with artists such as Sting, James Galway, Van Morrison, Paul Young, John Williams and many more. You can hear him on BBC TV series and Hollywood movie soundtracks such as the 2007 Oscar winning soundtrack for Atonement. In addition to his Pop, Jazz & Blues skills, Brendan is an expert player of Irish traditional music (winning the 1993 All Ireland Title), and performed for three years as soloist in the Riverdance Show. He’s recorded with well-known Irish artists such as Donal Lunny, Altan, Paul Brady, Arkady, Artie McGlynn, Mary Black and others. On top of his intense touring and recording schedule, he’s a respected harmonica technician and customizer, employed by Suzuki Musical Instruments Co. of Japan as their International Harmonica Specialist. I had the pleasure of catching up with Brendan while on tour at the SPAH festival in Saint Louis Missouri. I think you’ll really enjoy this interview short with one of today’s most diverse players. Videos include: Introduction and history, Alternative Tunings, Irish Music, Bulgarian Music, More on chromatic harmonica customizing & Closing

    Chris Michalek is highly regarded in the harmonica world as a musician who uses the overbend technique to its full potential. If you're interested in overbending I think you'll find this interview to be very insightful. Videos include: Introduction and overbend basics, When to teach overbends, Gapping, intonation and exercises, Visualizing overbends, More context for overbending, Overdraws, 12th position, 11th position, Playing example with and without overbends (11th position) & Recommended listening

    James Conway is one of the very few respected experts of Irish harmonica playing. I had the opportunity to spend some time with him at the SPAH festival in Saint Louis Missouri. I think you'll enjoy this quick look into this unique style of harmonica playing. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Embouchure used for Irish music, Essential listening and how to study Irish music & Closing


    Jason Ricci started the harmonica at a young age, with early achievements including winning the Sonny Boy Blues Society Contest, The Mars Music National Harmonica Contest and The Muddy Waters Award. Jason has been featured on various commercials, news broadcasts and television shows such as "Emeril Live." Through the years Jason has worked with Big Al and the Heavy Weights, Susan Tedeschi, Billy Gibson, Nick Curran and Junior Kimbrough to name but a few. Recently signing with EclectroGroove Records, His band, “Jason Ricci and New Blood,” keeps him on the road an average of 300 nights a year. Jason also teaches and performs at major harmonica events across the globe. Jason has a deep understanding of the tradition of classic blues harmonica and has taken his music into a new, unique style all his own. As you’ll hear in this interview, Jason draws influences from many forms of music, fully exploring in his shows blues, jazz, funk, rock and punk. Jason’s understanding of overbending, music theory and so many different styles, makes this a very informative and interesting journey into one of today’s top touring players. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Obscure players worth checking out, Approach to improvising, Keeping solos fresh throughout a performance, Recommendations for students regarding Improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Vibrato, Tongue blocking, Bending, Overbends part 1, Overbends part 2, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Playing in other positions besides 1st, 2nd and 3rd, High-end playing, Minor playing, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Personal Philosophy part 1, Personal Philosophy part 2 & Closing

    Joe Filisko’s contributions to the blues harmonica world are so varied and wide-reaching that it’s hard for me to think of where to start this introduction… Joe is first and foremost a great player… the greatest pre-war and country blues harmonica stylist to ever live. He’s studied this traditional, and mostly forgotten musical art form, with a deep passion for detail… historical accuracy… and simply a love for the music. Though not his goal… he has single-handedly revitalized this century-old blues harmonica art form… just ask any of my students how excited they were to attend his Country Blues Harmonica class at the last Harmonica Masterclass Workshop. What I just stated may lead you to believe that pre-war blues harmonica is all that Joe plays… but the story has just begun. Joe’s also a great post-war Chicago blues player and I wouldn’t take anyone’s bet that they could play more campfire, TV show or general harmonica novelty songs than Joe! Joe’s passionate attention to detail, love for the history of the music and his deep heart-felt interest in seeing his students achieve the highest level of musicianship they can reach for… makes Joe the best blues harmonica teacher I’ve met… this is clearly evident in this interview. Joe conducts workshops at all of the major harmonica events around the world and teaches weekly at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music. He’s been featured in documentaries; one specifically was the 1998 German film "Imagination is Limitless - Harmonica's Journey Around the World." He’s won Harmonica Player of the Year by the SPAH organization and was given the honor of performing solo at the 2006 Country Music Hall of Fame Medallion Ceremony for the Induction of DeFord Bailey. Joe is currently performing with Eric Noden and recently released their first album together. You can find details of their appearances at joefilisko.com. Though you’ve probably heard of Joe’s name relative to his mythic status as the father of harmonica customization… making harmonicas for the stars of the blues harmonica world… we’re not going to focus much on that side of his talents… we’re going to milk him for tips to help YOU become a better harmonica player. Video includes: Introduction, Early Influences, Essential pre-war listening, Essential post-war listening, Importance of studying the great masters, Approach to improvising, Recommendations for students regarding Improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Tongue blocking, Bending, Blow Bend, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 1st Position performance, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Playing in other positions besides 1st, 2nd and 3rd, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, High-end playing, Minor playing, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Approach to playing through the PA vocal mic, Equipment (mics and amps for stage and recording), Harmonicas, Personal Philosophy, What does it take to be a great blues harmonica player. Passion for pre-war blues harmonica & Closing

    John Nemeth grew up in Boise Idaho, singing in Catholic Church and with local bands. In 2002 he was picked up as a featured artist to perform with the famed Junior Watson Band. John also releasing his debut CD “Jack of Harps” that same year. John recorded "Come And Get It" with Junior Watson in 2004 to rave reviews, scoring well on the independent blues radio charts. In 2005 John was a featured artist with Anson Funderburgh and the Rockets. When John signed a multi-record recording agreement with Blind Pig Records in 2006, label head Jerry Del Giudice was quoted to say "how impressed I was with John's performance the one time I got the chance to see him. In our nearly 30 years in the business we have never before offered a new artist a recording contract on the strength of one performance." John has released two albums with Blind Pig, “Magic Touch” and “Love Me Tonight.” John is also on Elvin Bishop’s Grammy nominated album the Blues Rolls On. It’s my pleasure to bring such an accomplished singer and harp player to you for this detailed interview at BluesHarmonica.com. Videos include: Introduction and early Influences, About his Band and Recording, Essential Listening, Approach to improvising, How to keep a show interesting, Advice for new improvisors, Approach to accompaniment playing, Tongue blocking, Bending, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Minor playing, Why singing can help a harp player, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording) part 1, Equipment part 2, Personal Philosophy & Closing

    Mark Hummel was born in New Haven, Connecticut and raised in Los Angeles, California. Mark moved to Berkeley, California in 1972 where he played with local bluesmen such as Cool Papa, Boogie Jake, Mississippi Johnny Waters and Sonny Lane. In 1980 he lead the popular band, the Blues Survivors. In 1985, the Blues Survivors released Playing in Your Town, on Rockinitus Records, and immediately went on the road to tour the United States, Canada and Europe, often playing alongside such blues greats as Charlie Musselwhite, Brownie McGhee, Lowell Fulson and Eddie Taylor. Since 1991, 17 years now, Mark has been both producing & performing at his annual Blues Harmonica Blowout™ series. These shows have grown to be a much-heralded event & continue to draw sellout crowds wherever they appear. Mark works with a veritable who's who of the Blues harp world in these events, James Cotton, Charlie Musselwhite, Norton Buffalo, Kim Wilson, Huey Lewis, Carey Bell, Billy Boy Arnold, Rod Piazza, Rick Estrin, Paul deLay, Snooky Pryor, James Harman, Gary Primich, Sam Myers… and the list goes on. Keep your eyes on Mark’s website, markhummel.com for news of his blowout series coming to your town. Mark did not reach the status of top-echelon blues harp player by “just playing the gig.” Mark is truly into the music and the harp. He’s a very well-rounded player… not just comfortable in each position on the diatonic and chromatic harmonica… his playing is innovative and exciting, but still deeply rooted in traditional Chicago blues and with that touch of jump and swing blues that make the California players so swingin’. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Essential Listening, Approach to improvising, Keeping solos fresh throughout a performance, Approach to accompaniment playing, Developing bending skills, Tongue blocking, Blow bending and 1st position, Recommended players to listen to in 1st position, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Other positions and practice habits, Structure of blues and how it has influenced your playing, Approach to playing minor, Chromatic Harmonica - 1st, 2nd and 3rd positions, Major playing and slide-in playing part 1, Chromatic Harmonica - 1st, 2nd and 3rd positions, Major playing and slide-in playing part 2, How to work with a pickup band, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording), Personal Philosophy, Closing & Bonus Footage – Stories

    Peter “Madcat” Ruth’s music has been evolving for over 45 years… starting in the Chicago area in the early 1960's with folk/blues on guitar and harmonica. By the late 60's he had immersed himself in the Chicago Blues and was studying harmonica with the great Big Walter Horton. In the early 70's Madcat moved to Ann Arbor Michigan where he was a key presence in two of Ann Arbor's finest progressive rock bands: New Heavenly Blue and Sky King. By the mid 70's Madcat was touring the world with world-renown jazz pianist Dave Brubeck… an amazing accomplishment for a diatonic harmonica player. In the 80's Madcat went solo, infusing the folk/blues tradition with elements of rock and jazz. In 1990, Madcat teamed up with guitarist/singer Shari Kane to form the duo Madcat & Kane. Madcat’s playing can be heard on over 50 record albums as well as national television and radio appearances, symphony orchestra performances, radio and television advertisements, and has taught at harmonica workshops in the United States, Europe and Asia. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Lessons with Big Walter Horton, Playing with Brubeck family and multiple harps part 1, Playing with Brubeck family and multiple harps part 2, Essential Listening, Approach to improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Bending, Blow Bend, High-end playing, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Playing in other positions (4th, 5th and 12th), Minor playing and 5th position, Vibrato and shake, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording), Hand technique for playing into a vocal mic, Personal Philosophy & Closing

    Rick Estrin. best known as the lead vocalist and harmonica player with Little Charlie and the Nightcats, has for over 30 years been a leading figure in the world of traditional blues harmonica playing. Rick released his first album with Little Charlie and the Nightcats on Alligator Records in 1987 and has been touring and recording relentlessly for all of these years. Anyone who’s seen one of his performances has experienced that Rick really knows how to connect with the audience and give a stellar show. Rick Estrin is also a songwriter of unparalleled skill… winning the 1993 Blues Music Award for his composition, My Next Ex-Wife. Three of his songs found their way onto Grammy-nominated albums: Don't Put Your Hands On Me (from Koko Taylor's FORCE OF NATURE), I'm Just Lucky That Way (from Robert Cray's Shame + A Sin), and Homely Girl (from John Hammond's Trouble No More with Little Charlie & The Nightcats serving as his backing band). Other artists who have covered Estrin songs include Little Milton, Rusty Zinn, Kid Ramos and Mark Hummel. Rick has been an important influence on many of today’s great players and I’m really glad to have him with us to share his insights. Videos include: Introduction and early influences, Essential Listening, Approach to improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Tongue blocking, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Minor playing, Hand technique, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording), Song writing, Stage presence, Personal Philosophy & Closing

    R.J. Mischo. haling from the Minneapolis area, started his first band at the ripe age of 17. His first album Ready to Go with guitarist Teddy Morgan and Percy Strother helped push his career into the limelight, securing several successful European tours. After recording Rough ‘n’ Tough, live at the International Blues stage in Bremen Germany, he was picked up by the prestigious label Crosscut Records. RJ has released 6 CDs on Crosscut, 3 for Mountain Top Productions and actively records for independent movie sound tracks, documentaries, TV commercials and as a guest on other artist’s CDs. His newest release, “King of a mighty Good Time” will be on his own label Challis Records. RJ is known for his relaxed and personal stage presence on the bandstand and brings to this interview a lot of knowledge of how to work with pick-up bands around the world. Videos include: Introduction and early influences and essential listening, Approach to improvising, Approach to accompaniment playing, Keeping solos fresh throughout a performance, Tongue blocking, Blow Bending, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Chromatic harmonica and recommended listening, Hand technique and cupping, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Stage presence, Working with a pickup band, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording), Personal Philosophy, What do you like to hear when you listen to harmonica? & Closing

    Steve Baker was born and raised in London England and now lives near Hamburg, Germany, where he first came in the late 1970s with the well-known jugband "Have Mercy." His unique sound draws on the blues harmonica tradition and combines it with elements of country, folk, funk, soul and jazz to create an exciting and individual sound. Steve appears most frequently with Abi Wallenstein & Blues Culture… also as a duo with singer/guitarist Dick Bird. Before Chris Jones’ passing, Steve performed and recorded regularly this guitarist and songwriter. Chris and Steve released four acclaimed CDs together and toured Australia, Poland, Russia, the US, as well as Western Europe. Steve has made hundreds of recordings as a studio musician and can be heard on a wide variety of CD, film and TV productions. For over 20 years Steve has worked as a consultant for Hohner, closely involved in the development of several models including the Marine Band Deluxe. Steve is the top-most regarded author of harmonica literature in Europe and has written a number of instructional methods: The Harp Handbook, Interactive Blues Harp Workshop and three volumes of Blues Harmonica Playalongs. Steve teaches private lessons on a regular basis and instructs at all of the well-known events in Europe. In 2003 Steve started the annual Harmonica Masters Workshops in Trossingen Germany… the leading place for intermediate and advanced harmonica players to go and study in Europe. This interview was conducted October 31st, 2007 at the historic Hohner Music Conservatory in Trossingen German. Video lesson: Introduction and early influences, Essential Listening, Approach to improvising, Importance of understanding the structure of blues, Approach to accompaniment playing, Bending, How differential and overtones work, Tongue blocking, Minor playing, High-end playing and overbends, 1st Position playing and recommended listening, 3rd Position playing and recommended listening, Equipment (harps, mics and amps for stage and recording), Personal Philosophy, What do you like to hear when you listen to harmonica? & Closing

    Rod Piazza is a hugely influential player in the blues harmonica world. Rod started his recording career in 1965, teamed up with George "Harmonica" Smith for the band Bacon Fat in 1968 and redefined the sound of blues harmonica (a sound now called West Coast Blues) in the 1980's. Countless of today's pro players cut their teeth on Rod's recordings and he's now to share his thoughts and knowledge on the instrument and blues music.


    Andy Just - In the finest of West Coast blues harmonica traditions, Andy Just has been thrilling audiences with his explosive performances, not only in the states, but overseas as well. His sound is extremely powerful, and innovative, which has been honed by many years of playing, and touring. Andy is well known in Europe and Australia where he often entertains thousands at large blues festivals. Andy has been on at least 30 albums to date, and continues to record on the Blue Rockit Record label. As a 28-year blues veteran, Andy has had an opportunity to play with some of the greats. B.B. King, Bo Diddley, John Lee Hooker, Buddy Guy, Albert King, Paul Butterfield, Al Kooper, Nick Gravenites, Roy Rogers, Ronnie Wood, Robben Ford, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Luther Tucker, Albert Collins, Lazy Lester, Ike Turner, Ronnie Earl, Lowell Fullsom, Norton Buffalo, Jimmy Witherspoon, Junior Wells, Lee Oskar, Chris Cain, Gary Smith, Tommy Castro, James Cotton, John Mayall, Charlie Musslewhite, Garth Webber, Sista Monica, John Entwistle, David Raitt, Paul Rogers, Maria Muldaur, Angela Strehli, Joe Lewis Walker, Fenton Robinson and many others. Andy currently tours nationally and abroad with The Ford Blues Band, which he's been the front man for over a decade. The three most recent CDs "Another Fine Day," "The Ford Blues Band - In Memory of Michael Bloomfield with Robben Ford & Chris Cain," and "Robben Ford & The Ford Blues Band - A Tribute to Paul Butterfield," all which have received widespread acclaim. Other artists and bands that Andy lends his talents to are Robben Ford, Chris Cain and Gary Smith. Over the years he's had many band incarnations in and around the San Francisco Bay Area such as: Andy Just & The Defenders, Andy Just & The Shapes and Andy Just & The Shakedown. Some of the other work that Andy has done is a music score for George Lucas's film Murder in Mississippi, with Elmer Bernstien conducting. He's also done national commercials for Kellogg's, Chrysler Corporation and most recently he's played for a major film to be released in France. Visit www.andyjust.com for more information.

    Born in Los Angeles on Sonny Terry's birthday (October 24), Tom Ball began playing guitar at the age of eleven and took up harmonica two years later. A teenage member of the Yerba Buena Blues Band in the mid-1960's, he played Love-Ins and Sunset Strip nightclubs before leaving the country for most of the '70s. In 1978 he came back to the U.S. and teamed up with guitarist Kenny Sultan - a partnership that still flourishes today and has resulted in eight duo CDs and literally thousands of concerts and festivals all over the world. The Tom Ball & Kenny Sultan duo has appeared on television internationally, played for audiences of 300 million via Voice Of America, were featured on the Levi's 501 Blues commercials and are frequent guests of National Public Radio. Their music from the film Over The Edge won them the prestigious Telly Award in 1994, and they were the only musical act in America to play all four venues of the 1984 Olympic Games. In addition to working with Kenny, Tom has played harmonica on over 200 CDs, performed and sung on countless film soundtracks, TV shows and commercials, recorded four solo guitar CDs, written five instructional books and authored a couple of novels. Tom's most recent studio projects include playing with Jimmy Buffett's Coral Reefer Band on the soundtrack to the film "Hoot," and with Kenny Loggins on his latest two CDs, "All Join In" and "How About Now." Tom has been on the cover of both American Harmonica Newsmagazine and Harmonica World, and Blues Revue called his playing "stupendous," and Sound Choice magazine wrote, "The best acoustic blues act going, bar none!" Meanwhile he has carved out a secondary career as a solo guitarist and "kills time" writing both music books and fiction. Tom is one of the best acoustic harmonica players in today's scene. His Sonny Terry-influenced playing and control of hand usage on the harmonica are also of great interest in this interview. You can learn more about Tom at www.tomball.us Videos Include: The Early Years; Teaming up with Kenny Sultan; Early Influences on Harmonica; Essential Listening; Approach to Improvising; Keeping Solos Fresh Throughout an Evening; Recommendations for Improvising; Accompaniment Playing; Bending; Tongue Blocking; Position Playing; Chromatic Harmonica; Playing on the High-end; Music Theory; Playing in Minor; Equipment: Harps, Mics and Amps; Hand Usage and Growl; Sonny Terry Playing; Books and CDs; Philosophy; Closing

    Rob Paparozzi
    New Jersey-based frontman, singer and harmonica player Rob Paparozzi has been a blues performer since 1967. Rob has worked with a remarkably diverse list of major artists including B.B. King, Dr. John, Bruce Springsteen, Whitney Houston, Carole King, Roberta Flack, Culture Club, Cyndi Lauper, Randy Newman, Jimmy McGriff and James Galway. Rob had been touring the world with the “Original Blues Brothers Band,” featuring guitar legend Steve Cropper and special guest Eddie Floyd. Since 2005 to present Rob is the frontman for the Legendary "Blood Sweat and Tears." Rob’s own band The Hudson River Rats works the greater New York/New Jersey area as well as international touring and features Ed Alstrom, John Korba, Chris Eminizer, Bernard Purdie, George Naha and Bailey Gee. Rob brings a wide range of playing skill sets for both the diatonic and chromatic harmonicas. His session work with a wide array of musicians and musical styles makes this interview both entertaining (lots of stories) and educational (valuable insight). This interview was held in August of 2010.

    PT Gazell - First picking up the instrument in his late teens, the Wisconsin-born, self-taught player PT Gazell honed his craft by taking on all manner of musical styles including bluegrass, folk and pop. PT found his way to Lexington, Kentucky in the mid-seventies. At the time Lexington was a hotbed of young bluegrass musicians and PT fell right in with the likes of Ricky Skaggs, Jerry Douglas, Bela Fleck and others. While in Lexington, PT recorded his first album for Sugar Hill Records titled Pace Yourself. PT was the first harmonica player, and the second artist, to be honored with a recording contract with famed Sugar Hill Records. PT soon became a sought after side man and session player for some of Nashville's biggest stars and spent the next part of his career playing and recording all over the world along side the stars of the day. As exciting and fun as that period was, I also began to get somewhat frustrated. Tired by the road and frustrated by the musical limitations presented by the standard diatonic harmonica, Gazell put his instrument down and disappeared for a while. When he finally reemerged it was with a newfound enthusiasm in part created by his introduction to valved harmonicas. Using self-valved harps, Gazell's music literally soared to new heights as this new approach allowed him access to musical possibilities hidden on standard diatonic harmonicas. And PT came out swinging. his first recording using the valved diatonic is a masterful swing record entitled Swingin' Easy, Hittin' Hard released in 2005. Gazell's playing on this record begs comparisons to jazz greats Benny Goodman and Ben Webster. The record spurred a brand new interest in PT and soon he was back on the road, only this time fronting various combinations of jazz and swing musicians. Critics and fans alike hailed Gazell's return to live performing and Swingin' Easy, Hittin' Hard quickly became a favorite at NPR stations across the United States.In 2008 Gazell and New Zealand chromatic harmonica wizard Brendan Power teamed up for the CD Back To Back. This CD features standards and jazz classics reinterpreted by two of the world's most gifted harmonica instrumentalists.

    Jimmy Lee - Grew up in the San Francisco Bay area. After relocating to Hawaii, he spent 12 years captivating audiences from around the world and was voted Best In the State by the Hawaiian Blues Society. He now resides in Austin, Texas where the Austin Blues Society awarded him First Place in the Solo/Duo category at the Heart O' Texas Blues Challenge 2008, and was first to represent Austin at the Blues Foundation International Blues Challenge 2009 in Memphis. Jimi Lee won in Austin again this year and made Austinites proud when he won the 2010 International Blues Challenge Semi-Finals in Memphis. He competed at the Finals as one of the top eight Solo/Duo acts in the world. Jimi was awarded First Place in Blues in 2008 by the Austin Songwriters Group for his song "Pocket Full of Soul." This followed his 2006 win with "Laundromat" and his 2005 win with "Where Are You Tonight." The 2005 contest was held by Austin Songwriter Group and Nashville Songwriters Association International. He went on to win even more that year with a First Place in the Pop category with "I Wanna Kiss You So Bad", and Third Place in Blues Rock with "Cheap Thrills". The Austin Chapter of the Harmonica Organization of Texas declared Jimi Lee as "one of the best in the world" at playing harmonica in the rack and guitar simultaneously. The 2008 spring issue of Harmonica Happenings magazine featured Jimi in an article entitled "Rack 'm Up! Playing Harp In A Neck Rack: A Q&A With Jimi Lee." Jimi has performed at the Society for the Preservation and Advancement of the Harmonica at the Harmonica World convention every year since his first appearance in 2003. Harmonica World convention leaders say' "Jimi is part of the tradition." Jimi travels the country as harmonica and guitarist clinician and shares endorsement's for Seydel Harmonicas with James Cotton, Charlie Musselwhite and Mark Hummel. Over the years, Jimi has ignited stages alongside giants such as Muddy Waters, Bobby Blue Bland, John Lee Hooker, Willie Nelson, Clarence Clemons, Stephen Stills, Coco Montoya, Pinetop Perkins, Charlie Musselwhite, James Cotton, Kim Wilson, Mark Hummel, Jason Ricci, and Chicago's own "shuffle master" Sam Lay. Jimi is well known for his stellar guitar, vocals and rack harmonica playing. Make sure not to miss our discussions on this and music theory. This interview was recorded in Minneapolis, Minnesota August of 2010.

    Michael Peloquin is a respected singer, arranger, harmonica player and saxophonist in the California Bay Area. Traversing Blues, R&B, Country and American Music, Michael is a very diverse player. His mastery of theory, horn lines and overbending makes his viewpoint valuable to BluesHarmonica.com students. Lessons include: Introduction and the Early Days; Early Influences; Michael's Recordings; Importance of Music Theory; Essential Listening - Part 1; Essential Listening - Part 2; Improvising & Vibrato Usage - Part 1; Improvising & Vibrato Usage - Part 2; Accompaniment Playing - Part 1; Accompaniment Playing - Part 2; Accompaniment Playing - Part 3; Tongue Blocking, Bending, Blow Bending & Overbending - Part 1; Blow Bending & Overbending - Part 2; Mastering the High End; Chromatic Harmonica; Equipment & Closing

    Billy Branch was born in Chicago in 1951 and was raised in Los Angeles. He first picked up a harmonica at the age of ten and immediately began to play simple tunes. Billy returned to Chicago in the summer of '69 and graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in political science. It was during these years that he was introduced to the Blues. He soon became immersed in the local blues scene. He spent a great deal of time at legendary blues clubs such as Queen Bee's and Theresa's Lounge and learned from harmonica players Big Walter Horton, James Cotton, Junior Wells and Carey Bell. His big break came in 1975 during a harmonica battle when he beat Chicago legend, Little Mac Simmons at the Green Bunny Club. He made his first recording for Barrelhouse Records and began to work as an apprentice harp player in Willie Dixon's Chicago Blues All-Stars. He eventually replaced Carey Bell and worked with Willie Dixon for six years.During this time, Billy formed the Sons Of Blues (S.O.B's) featuring musicians who where the sons of famous blues artists. The original S.O.B's consisted of Billy, Lurrie Bell, Freddie Dixon and Garland Whiteside. They toured Europe and played at the Berlin Jazz Festival. Shortly afterward, they recorded for Alligator Record's Grammy-nominated Living Chicago Blues sessions, and Billy has been a regular studio player appearing on over fifty albums. Billy has recorded and/or performed with an incredible list of Blues legends including: Muddy Waters, Big Walter Horton, Son Seals, Lonnie Brooks, Koko Taylor, Johnny Winter, and Albert King. In 1990 he appeared with the three harp legends Carey Bell, Junior Wells, and James Cotton on the W.C Handy Award winning album Harp Attack! His most recent recordings for the Polygram label are entitled The Blues Keep Following Me Around and Satisfy Me. Billy is also passing on the blues tradition to a new generation through his Blues In The Schools program. He is a dedicated blues educator and has taught in the Chicago school system for over twenty years as part of the Urban Gateways Project. In 1996, some of his finest students opened the Main Stage at the Chicago Blues Festival which was broadcast throughout the U.S. on National Public Radio. This interview took place at Mark Hummel's Blues Harmonica Blowout on January 15th, 2011. Videos include: The; Early Years; Essential Listening; Recordings; Improvising; Accompaniment; Tongue Blocking; Bending; 3rd Position; Chromatic; 1st Position; Band Communication; Minor Playing; Advice to Harp Players; Equipment; What it Means to be a Harp Player; Closing

    Buddy Greene brings a wide variety of southern Americana influences to his music to create a unique musical hybrid of country, bluegrass, folk, gospel and traditional blues. In addition to his solid reputation as a singer-songwriter and guitarist, Buddy has established himself as one of Nashville's finest harmonica stylists. His live concerts are equal parts hymn sing, jam session, church house revival, and journey through his own musical history. Growing up in Macon, GA, Buddy spent his childhood learning folk songs on the ukulele and soon advanced to acoustic guitar, immersing himself in popular music mainstays of the time such as Elvis Presley, the Beatles, and Motown. Their infectious beat and familiar nods to roots music fueled Buddy's intense interest in the deeper historical origins of country, bluegrass and rhythm and blues music that is represented in his music today. Buddy's newest release, "Harmonica Anthology" is 16 song journey into the wonderful world of the harmonica. Co- produced with Bryan Sutton and featuring a bevy of Nashville's finest musicians, including 2 duets with harmonica hero Charlie McCoy. This project allowed Buddy to demonstrate some of the wonderful variety available on this simple but highly expressive little instrument. Irish slip jigs and reels, old time and Texas fiddle tunes, beautiful ballads and timeless anthems, updated versions of some old crowd pleasers (Orange Blossom Special, William Tell Overture), and a few vocal songs as well - it all makes for a musical offering that satisfies. Videos Include: Introduction & Early Years; Early Stage Work; Recommended Listening; Tips on Developing Bending Control; Tongue Blocking; Jaw Movement & Speed Playing; Country & Paddy Richter Tuning; Accompaniment Playing; Approach to Improvising; Playing the Chromatic Harmonica; Positions other than 1st, 2nd and 3rd; Mastering the High End of the Harmonica; How to Approach Playing at your Church; Buddy Greene's Equipment; Closing Words

    Steve Guyger - Philadelphia is home to one of the finest blues harp players in the world, much to the surprise of people not "inside" the blues scene. Over the past thiry-plus years, Steve Guyger with his band, The Excellos, has been dishing out some of the finest blues to be heard anywhere. Steve has toured with the late Jimmy Rogers, among others, and has played with many of the great Chicago bluesmen and contemporary players, yet he remains one of the best kept secrets in blues. The late William Clarke called Steve "the best harp player I've ever seen." Mark Hummel called him "a monster player." If you have heard Steve play, you know what they're talking about. If you've never heard him, you're missing a major page in your blues portfolio. Steve began playing harp back in the late 60's on a harmonica given to him by his future sister-in-law. Sometime later, his brother turned him on to Paul Butterfield. Steve's passion for the blues harp took him to Chicago to learn at the feet of the masters of the art. Each trip taught him skills that he brought back to the local bands in which he paid his dues. Steve has shared the stage with the greats in Chicago and the contemporary harp players touring the world today, names like Little Sammy Davis, Carey Bell, Rick Estrin, Rod Piazza, Kim Wilson, Mark Hummel, Dennis Gruenling, Charlie Musselwhite and many others. His playing, vocals, songwriting and stage presence have earned him a place among the best of the players on stage today. Videos Include: Introduction & Early Influences - Part 1; Introduction & Early Influences - Part 2; Early Stage Work; Improvising; Accompaniment Playing & Early Amplified Work; Tongue Blocking;Minor Playing & Chromatic Harmonica; 3rd Position Playing; 1st Position Playing; Steve Guyger's Equipment; What Steve Guyger likes to hear in other Harp Players & Closing

    Jelly Roll Johnson - Kirk "Jelly Roll" Johnson's distinctive, soulful style of harmonica has earned him critical acclaim, numerous awards, and a place among Nashville's top session musicians. A native of Lake Charles, Louisiana, Jelly Roll's career has spanned 35 years. He began playing harmonica at age 19 in Cleveland, Tennessee. After touring with several rock, blues and country groups, he settled in Knoxville to work with the Tommy Cole Band. From 1979 to 1989, Jelly Roll played concerts and club dates all across America with Warner Brothers recording artist Con Hunley. The group opened for acts such as Alabama, The Oak Ridge Boys, Loretta Lynn and Emmylou Harris. Since moving to Nashville in 1984, he has recorded with Trisha Yearwood, Kenny Rogers, Etta James, Guy Clark, Lee Ann Womack, Travis Tritt, Shania Twain, The Judds, Alan Jackson and many others. His unique sound has been heard on over 50 gold and platinum albums, including three Grammy winning albums by Randy Travis. Jelly Roll has made numerous television appearances with various artists, including Faith Hill on "Late Show with David Letterman," Alan Jackson and Jamie O'Neal on "Tonight Show with Jay Leno," Trisha Yearwood and the Judds on the "Country Music Association Awards Show," and Con Hunley on "Austin City Limits" and "Soundstage." In 1998, Jelly Roll won the Nashville Music Award for Best Wind Instrumentalist. After receiving nominations for 1998 and 2000, he won the best Specialty Instrument Award for 2003 and 2008 from the Academy of Country Music. Jelly regularly performs at Nashville's world-famous Bluebird Cafe with hit songwriters Fred Knobloch, Thom Schuyler, Tony Arata and Don Schlitz.Artist Recordings: Alabama, Pat Alger, Gary Allan, Bill Anderson, Anointed, Tony Arata, Suzy Bogguss, Bonepony, Bob Carlisle, Kim Carnes, Peter Cetera, Kenny Chesney, Mark Chesnutt, Mark Collie, Guy Clark, Jessi Colter, Ronny Cox, Lacy J. Dalton, Billy Dean, Kevin Denney, Dean Dillon, Nokie Edwards, Michael English, Skip Ewing, George Fox, Jeff Foxworthy, Gaither Vocal Band, Gatlin Brothers, Crystal Gayle, Bob Gibson, Vern Gosdin (Duet w/ Randy Travis), Josh Gracin, Nanci Griffith, Jennifer Hanson, Wade Hayes, Eric Heatherly, Bertie Higgins, Malcolm, Holcombe, Rebecca Lynn Howard, Con Hunley, Sylvia Hutton, Randall Hylton, Alan Jackson, Etta James, Jamey Johnson, Michael Johnson, George Jones, The Judds, Sammy Kershaw, Hal Ketchum, B. B. King (Duet w/ Randy Travis), The Katinas, Jorma Kaukonen, Sean Keane, Fred Knobloch, Al Kooper, Alison Krauss, McGuffey Lane, Lonestar, Kathy Mattea, Tim McGraw, Reba McEntire, Pat McLaughlin, Jo Dee Messina, Victor Mecyssne, Buddy Mondlock, John Michael Montgomery, Craig Morgan, Nicole C. Mullen, Joe Nichols, The O'Kanes, Jake Owen, Tom Paxton, Suzi Ragsdale, Kenny Rogers, Jim Rooney, Tom Rush, Darrell Scott, Dan Seals, T. G. Sheppard, Sierra, Charles Sizemore, Skid Row, Red Steagall, Doug Stone, Marty Stuart, Barry & Holly Tashian, Verlon Thompson, Pam Tillis, Randy Travis, Travis Tritt, Josh Turner, Shania Twain, Phil Vassar, Bobby Vinton, Susan Werner, Don Williams, Hank Williams, Jr. Jack Williams, Trent Willmon, Lee Ann Womack, Darryl Worley, Trisha Yearwood and Steve Young. Videos Include: Introduction & The Early Years; Recording & Performance; Essential Listening & Recording Experiences; Accompaniment Playing; Improvising; Use of Overbends; 1st Position Playing; 3rd Position Playing; Minor Playing; Chromatic Harmonica; Tongue Blocking; Bending; Music Theory; Jelly Roll's Equipment; Closing

    Richard Sleigh has 35 years experience playing the harmonica, including studio work for films, TV shows, radio, as well as performing with a wide variety of acts from Bo Diddley to the Bridgeton Symphony Orchestra. Richard is respected as one of the world’s top harmonica customizers, working in the Filisko guild of customization. Richard has developed tools for working on harmonicas (covered in our Harp Tech lessons) as well as written one of the best books on the subject. This interview was conducted in Norfolk, Virginia in August of 2011. To learn more about Richard and his work visit: http://rsleigh.com/. Videos: Introduction; Richard Plays Different Style Examples; Importance of Chording; Major Pentatonic Scales; Essential Listening; 1st Position Playing; 3rd Position Playing; 4th Position Playing; 5th Position Playing; 12th Position Playing & General Position Discussion; Bending; Tongue Blocking, Part 1 and Overbending; Tongue Blocking, Part 1 and Variable Splits; Blow Bending; High End Playing; Harmonicas - Comb Material; Harmonicas - Coverplates; Harmonicas - What makes a Harmonica Play Great?; Closing

    Adam Gussow. currently an Associate Professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi with a specialty in blues literature and culture, Adam Gussow was one of the first amplified blues harp players to make overbends a key element of his stylistic approach, adapting Howard Levy's innovations in the late 1980s in a way that helped usher in a new generation of overbend masters such as Carlos Del Junco, Jason Ricci and Chris Michalek. According to a reviewer for American Harmonica Newsletter, Gussow's playing is characterized by "technical mastery and innovative brilliance that comes along once in a generation." Gussow is best known for his long partnership with Mississippi-born guitarist and one-man-band Sterling "Mr. Satan" Magee as the duo Satan and Adam. After working the streets of Harlem from 1986 to 1991, Gussow and Magee duo toured internationally between 1991 and 1998. Their performing credits include the Chicago Blues Festival, the Newport Jazz Festival, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, The King Biscuit Blues Festival, the Kansas City Jazz & Blues Festival, the Philadelphia Folk Festival and RiverBlues Festival, and more, along with hundreds of club gigs. They toured with Bo Diddley and opened for Buddy Guy, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Otis Clay, Johnny Winter, and Jimmy Thackery. They released two albums on Flying Fish Records, including the W. C. Handy-nominated Harlem Blues (1991) and Mother Mojo (1993). Later releases include Living on the River (1996) and, on the Modern Blues Harmonica label, Word on the Street: Harlem Recordings, 1989 (2008) and Back In The Game (2011). In 1996 Satan and Adam were the cover story in Living Blues magazine; according to editor David Nelson, Gussow enjoyed the curious honor of being "the first white blues musician to be so prominently spotlighted in the magazine's 26-year history." In addition to his career with Magee, Gussow has worked in duo, band, and studio settings with guitarists Charlie Hilbert, Irving Louis Lattin, Wild Jimmy Spruill, Robert Ross, Bill Abel, Andrew "Shine" Turner, Bill Sims, Jr. and Brian Kramer. He has released two albums with Hilbert on the Modern Blues Harmonica label: Blues Classics (2007) and Live in Klingenthal (2008). In his recent incarnation as a one-man band, Gussow takes a cue from Magee and does it all-singing, blowing amplified harp, and stomping out some thump-and-metal grooves. Gussow's first solo album, Kick and Stomp (2010), spent many weeks at #1 in the "Hot New Releases in Acoustic Blues" chart at Amazon mp3's. It also received extensive airplay on Bluesville (SiriusXM), America's premier satellite radio blues show, and rose to the #2 position in the "picks to click" category. His second solo album, Southbound (2011), expands the one-man band sound with the help of Mississippi's finest session musicians, including bassists Jerry Jemmott and Dave Woolworth; it takes Gussow's distinctive mix of blues, jazz, and down-home funk to the next level. Gussow is known to harmonica students around the world as a result of his "dirty-South blues harp channel" at YouTube and download video tutorials at his website, Modern Blues Harmonica. Gussow's other musical credits include a stint with the bus-and-truck tour of Big River; several decades as a blues harmonica instructor at The Guitar Study Center in New York and in private practice; and a nine-time coach at Jon Gindick's Blues Harmonica Jam Camps. He's also headlined the Mundharmonika-Live festival in Klingenthal, Germany (2008) and has taught at Blues Week in the UK (2008). In the spring of 2010, Gussow added a new credit line to his resume´ as the creator and promoter of Hill Country Harmonica, a two-day intensive that drew more than 100 players from 30 states and 7 foreign countries to Foxfire Ranch in north Mississippi to study with Billy Branch, Billy Gibson, Johnny Sansone, and other top pros. HCH 2011 drew almost 150 players and featured Sugar Blue, Jason Ricci, Charlie Sayles, Jimi Lee, Deak Harp, and Brandon Bailey, among others. An award-winning scholar and memoirist, Gussow is the author of three blues-themed books: Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir (1998; reissued in 2009); Seems Like Murder Here: Southern Violence and the Blues Tradition (2002); and Journeyman's Road: Modern Blues Lives From Faulkner's Mississippi to Post-9/11 New York (2007). He is currently at work on a book-length study of the devil-figure in the blues. Videos include: Early Influences, Part 1; Early Influences, Part 2; Lessons with Nat Riddles, Part 1; Lessons with Nat Riddles, Part 2; Lessons with Nat Riddles, Part 3; Accompaniment Playing, Part 1; Accompaniment Playing, Part 2; Influence from Horn Players and Rhythm; Improvising, Part 1; Improvising, Part 2; Improvising, Part 3; 3rd Position Playing; 1st Position Playing; Chromatic Harmonica; Importance of Music Theory; Minor Playing & More Music Theory; Adam's Equipment, Part 1; Adam's Equipment, Part 2; Where are we in the History of Harmonica Education? Part 1; Where are we in the History of Harmonica Education? Part 2; Closing

    Billy Boy Arnold was born in Chicago on September 16, 1935. Unlike the many blues artists who migrated to Chicago from the South, Arnold is among the first generation of bluesmen actually born and raised in the city. He fell in love with the blues at an early age and was especially moved by the records of the first Sonny Boy Williamson. In 1948, young Billy found out that Williamson lived nearby, and he set out to find him. "To me, this was a burning desire-I wanted to be like Sonny Boy," recalls Billy. Williamson took a liking to the young fan and revealed his trademark style of "choking" the harp to Billy. Shortly after their third visit together, Williamson met his untimely death. But the few visits were enough to make Billy determined to become a bluesman. In the ensuing years, Arnold befriended many of the local blues legends, and he began to learn everything he could about the blues. Blind John Davis, Big Bill Broonzy, Memphis Minnie, Muddy Waters, Johnny Jones, Johnny Shines, Otis Rush, Little Walter, and Earl Hooker all played a part in Arnold's musical education. In 1952, the teenaged Billy landed his first recording contract with Chicago's Cool label. It wasn't until his first record came out (I Ain't Got No Money b/w Hello Stranger) under the name "Billy Boy Arnold" that he realized he had a nickname. "I didn't like it at first," recalls Billy Boy. "I was 17 and looked 15, but told people I was 19, so I didn't want to be known as a boy. I wanted to be a man." Though the recording was admittedly immature, the name stuck, and Billy Boy Arnold was on his way. While still a teenager, Arnold hooked up with a young street musician/electronics buff named Ellis McDaniel (Bo Diddley) who fashioned an amplifier for Billy Boy out of an orange crate. Billy Boy eventually talked Diddley into auditioning for Chess Records. In 1955, with Billy Boy playing his signature "stop time" harmonica, Diddley scored the first of his many hits for Chess with "I'm A Man." The future looked very bright, but Billy Boy didn't want to be a sideman. He wanted to make records under his own name. After a misunderstanding with Leonard Chess (Bo Diddley told Arnold that Leonard didn't like him), Arnold crossed the street to the offices of VeeJay Records, where he was promptly signed. He recorded I Wish You Would (reportedly the first blues session to feature an electric bass), and it quickly became a regional hit. He was playing across the South Side of Chicago with stars like Little Walter and Junior Wells, and local radio airplay for his song was heavy. Even the great Muddy Waters took a liking to the young bluesman. "You made a good record," Waters said of I Wish You Would. "You keep on making those good records." And that's just what Billy Boy did: I Ain't Got You, She's Fine, She's Mine and Prisoner's Plea followed. Although only 20 years old, Billy Boy Arnold had arrived. Arnold continued to play the Chicago clubs and record 45s throughout the late 1950s. His debut album, 1963's MORE BLUES FROM THE SOUTH SIDE for the Prestige label, remains a classic. But the gigs began to dry up, and the difficulty of raising a family and keeping a band together led Arnold to pursue a career as a Chicago bus driver and truant officer and later as a parole officer for the State of Illinois. By the middle of the 1960s, the first generation of British blues bands were taking notice of Arnold's talent-his VeeJay singles became valued collectors' items among the musicians. The Yardbirds and The Animals each had hits with Billy Boy's songs. Later, The Blasters and David Bowie both covered his material. All of this interest led Billy Boy to tour and record in Europe (and play the occasional U.S. festival gig) during the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. With the release of BACK WHERE I BELONG in 1992, Billy Boy Arnold enjoyed the greatest success of his career. "Billy Boy Arnold delivers the goods," exclaimed the Los Angeles Daily News. "Highly recommended," agreed Jazz Times. "Triumphant," added Billboard. Features and reviews ran in magazines and newspapers from coast to coast and in Europe, including Rolling Stone, Audio, CD Review, Living Blues, Blues & Rhythm, The Chicago Tribune, and The Washington Post. Everyone agreed. Billy Boy Arnold had created an album of songs that not only equaled the strength of his early hits, but indeed surpassed them in their maturity and execution. This interview was held in January of 2012 in Oakland, California. Videos include: Billy Boy's early years and meeting John Lee Williamson, Part 1; Billy Boy's early years and meeting John Lee Williamson, Part 2; Working with Bo Diddley; More Recording History; Billy Boy talks about Little Walter; Billy Boy talks about Rice Miller, Big Walter Horton, Kim Wilson and Junior Wells; Improvising; Tongue Blocking; Accompaniment Playing; Position Playing; Chromatic Harmonica; Tips to Harmonica Players and Closing

    Sugar Ray Norcia started to play blues harp in high school. Once Norcia had relocated to Providence, Rhode Island, he formed the Bluetones which secured a residence as the house band at a local nightclub. They backed touring acts, such as Big Walter Horton, Big Mama Thornton, Big Joe Turner and Roosevelt Sykes in nearby clubs. During the latter part of the 1970s the band backed Ronnie Earl before he left to join Roomful of Blues. Norcia's solo recordings included the EPs Sugar Ray and the Bluetones (1979); Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters featuring the Sensational Sugar Ray (1982), plus a couple of releases on Rounder Records, Knockout (1989) and Don't Stand In My Way (1991). Don't Stand In My Way was the first release by the Bullseye Blues label. The Bluetones also backed Miki Honeycutt on her initial album, Soul Deep. In 1991 Norcia joined Roomful of Blues as their lead vocalist. They issued three albums with Norcia and undertook extensive touring duties. Norcia also undertook work away from the group. He appeared on a Bullseye Blues album from trombonist Porky Cohen, Rhythm and Bones, (1996) and on the LP Little Anthony and Sugar Ray: Take It From Me, (1994). Also in 1994 Norcia appeared on Otis Grand's Nothing Else Matters album. In 1998 Norcia exited from Roomful of Blues, and issued Sweet & Swingin', which featured songs written by Hank Williams, Arthur Alexander and Big Walter Horton; plus a guest appearance from The Jordanaires. In 1999 Norcia participated with James Cotton, Billy Branch and Charlie Musselwhite, on the Grammy Award nominated album, Superharps. More recently, Norcia contributed his harmonica playing on records by Pinetop Perkins and Doug James, in addition to touring along with the 'Sugar Ray Norcia Big Band'. In June 2007, Sugar Ray and the Bluetones released their seventh studio album, My Life, My Friends, My Music on Severn Records. This interview was held in January of 2012 in Oakland, California. Videos Include: Sugar Ray's Early Years; The Bluetones, Big Walter Horton and Roomful of Blues; Sugar Ray's; Current Schedule; Essential Artists to Study; Improvising; Accompaniment Playing; Bending and Music Theory; Tongue Blocking; 1st Position Playing; 3rd Position Playing; Chromatic Harmonica; Vocals and Stage Presence; What do you like to hear when Listening to other Harmonica Players?; Sugar Ray's; Equipment; Closing

    Harmonica master Charlie Musselwhite’s life reads like a classic blues song: born in Mississippi, raised in Memphis and schooled on the South Side of Chicago. A groundbreaking recording artist since the 1960s, Musselwhite continues to create trailblazing music while remaining firmly rooted in the blues. His worldly-wise vocals, rich, melodic harmonica playing and deep country blues guitar work flawlessly accompany his often autobiographical and always memorable original songs. Born into a blue collar family in Kosciusko, Mississippi on January 31, 1944 and raised by a single mother, Musselwhite grew up surrounded by blues, hillbilly and gospel music on the radio and outside his front door. His family moved to Memphis, where, as a teenager, he worked as a ditch digger, concrete layer and moonshine runner. Fascinated by the blues, Musselwhite began playing guitar and harmonica. It wasn’t easy growing up a poor, white boy in Memphis, even among the rich musical influences the city offered. He felt like an outcast and a stranger (themes that have informed, inspired and haunted his music to this day). As a teen, Musselwhite attended parties hosted by Elvis Presley and hobnobbed with many of the local musicians, including Johnny Cash and Johnny Burnette, but the celebrities young Charlie sought out were Memphis’ veteran bluesmen like Furry Lewis, Will Shade and Gus Cannon. Following the path of so many, Musselwhite moved to Chicago looking for better paying work. While driving an exterminator truck as a day job, Charlie lived on the South Side and hung out in blues clubs at night, developing close friendships with blues icons Little Walter, Big Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson, Big Joe Williams, Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Before long, he was sitting in at clubs with Muddy and others, building an impressive word-of-mouth reputation. Soon after, Charlie was being paid to play in the same South Side neighborhood. Noted blues journalist Dick Shurman says, “The black Chicago blues artists all liked Charlie as a person. They felt that he was one of them — a southern country boy with a deep affinity for the blues.” His first recording, under the name Memphis Charlie, was with Big Walter Horton on the famous Vanguard Records series, Chicago/The Blues/Today. Signing with Vanguard, Musselwhite (along with Paul Butterfield who was as urban as Charlie was rural) brought the amplified harmonica blues to a new audience of young, white rock and rollers, who discovered that Charlie personified the cool and hip counter-culture icons they admired. After the release of his first full-length LP — Stand Back! Here Comes Charlie Musselwhite’s South Side Band — he was embraced by the growing youth counter-culture and the newly emerging progressive rock FM radio stations, especially on the West Coast. His iconic status established, he relocated to San Francisco, often playing the famed Fillmore Auditorium. Over the years, he has released albums on a variety of labels, ranging from straight blues to music mixing elements of jazz, gospel, Tex-Mex, Cuban and other world music, winning new fans at every turn. He has been touring nationally and internationally for four decades and is among the best-known and best-loved blues musicians in the world. Over the last 43 years Musselwhite has released over 30 albums. Three of those—1990's Ace Of Harps, 1991’s Signature and 1993’s In My Time—were recorded for Alligator Records and remain among his best-selling titles. Now, Charlie Musselwhite returns to Alligator with The Well. With musical flavors from Mississippi to Memphis to Chicago, The Well is steeped in the music of Charlie’s youth—country and city blues as well as rockabilly and gospel — the music that inspired his signature sound. The fresh, new songs speak from his decades of experience, hard living, and his triumph over adversity. Musselwhite has guested on numerous recordings, as a featured player with Tom Waits, Eddie Vedder, Ben Harper, John Lee Hooker, Bonnie Raitt, The Blind Boys of Alabama, INXS and most recently Cyndi Lauper. He has shared stages with countless blues and rock musicians. He was inducted into the Blues Foundation’s Blues Hall Of Fame in 2010, has been nominated for six Grammy Awards and has won 24 Blues Music Awards. The San Francisco Chronicle says, “Charlie Musselwhite’s harmonica playing shows taste, bite, restraint and power. He’s one of the best, and as a bluesman, he’s as real as they come.” Charlie Musselwhite today is as vital and creative as at any point in his long career. DownBeat calls him, “the undisputed champion of the blues harmonica.” In addition to his always-busy schedule, he hosts a weekly radio show, “Charlie’s Backroom,” on KRSH-FM in Santa Rosa, California (streamed at KRSH.com Sundays at 10:00am PST). He considers himself a lifelong learner and is constantly perfecting his craft. With The Well, Charlie Musselwhite returns with the strongest, most intimate album of his career — a powerful, personal collection of songs. Musselwhite’s blues, imparting his hard-won knowledge and working class wisdom, are a window into the deep well of his Mississippi soul. This interview was held in Oakland, California in January of 2012. Videos include: Charlie’s Early Years: Memphis; Charlie’s Early Years: Chicago, Part 1; Charlie’s Early Years: Chicago, Part 2; Charlie’s Early Years: Chicago, Part 3 and Big Walter Horton; Moving to California; Gary Smith; Improvising; Accompaniment Playing; Position Playing; Minor Playing; Bending; Tongue Blocking; Playing the Chromatic and more Big Walter Horton Stories; What Charlie Likes to Hear in Other Players; Little Walter and Cadillac Records; Charlie’s Equipment; Closing Closing

    Harmonica master Curtis Salgado’s been perfecting his craft since he first began playing professionally in the late 1960s. He fronted his own group (The Nighthawks), inspired John Belushi to create The Blues Brothers, was co-star of The Robert Cray Band and sang and toured with Roomful Of Blues. He released his first of eight solo albums in 1991, hitting the road hard year after year. Salgado and his band toured with The Steve Miller Band and Curtis spent a summer singing with Santana before being sidelined by serious health issues in 2006. He’s battled his way back, and, after a full and complete recovery, has been tearing up concert stages all over the country. Winner of the 2010 Blues Music Award for Soul Blues Artist Of The Year, Salgado effortlessly mixes blues, funk and R&B with a delivery that is raw and heartfelt. Blues Revue says, “Salgado is one of the most down-to-earth, soulful, honest singers ever, and his harmonica work is smoking and thoroughly invigorating. rollicking, funky and electrifying.” Born February 4, 1954 in Everett, Washington, Salgado grew up in Eugene, Oregon. His parents were “hip,” according to Salgado, and his house was always filled with music. His parents’ collection included everything from Count Basie to Fats Waller, and his older brother and sister turned him on to the soul and blues of Wilson Pickett and Muddy Waters. His father liked to sing, and would point out specific passages in a Count Basie or Ray Charles recordings for Curtis to pay close attention to, and the youngster soaked it all up. He attended a Count Basie performance when he was 13 and decided then and there that music was his calling. Curtis began devouring the blues of Little Walter and Paul Butterfield, fell in love with the harmonica and taught himself to play. He played his first professional gigs when he was 16, and by 18 he was already making a name for himself in Eugene’s bar scene. With his band The Nighthawks, he became a must-see act in Eugene and throughout the Northwest. In 1973, Salgado met Robert Cray and the two became fast friends. They jammed often, sometimes sitting in with each other’s bands, often playing double bills. In 1975, Salgado had the idea to start a blues festival in Eugene in order to meet and play with as many established blues stars as possible. The festival became an annual event, allowing Curtis to back up, befriend and occasionally house legends including Floyd Dixon, Frankie Lee, Luther Tucker, Otis Rush, Clifton Chenier, Sonny Rhodes and Albert Collins. In fact, it was Salgado—whose Nighthawks backed Collins locally—who crowned the blues legend with the title he would carry for the rest of his career: “The Master Of The Telecaster.” In 1977, comedian/actor John Belushi was in Eugene filming Animal House. During downtime from filming, Belushi caught a typically balls-out Salgado performance. Afterwards the two got to talking and a friendship grew. Before long Salgado began playing old records for Belushi, teaching him about blues and R&B. Belushi soaked up the music like a sponge and soon developed his idea for The Blues Brothers, first as a skit on Saturday Night Live and then as a major motion picture and a best-selling record album and concert tour. The album, Briefcase Full Of Blues, is dedicated to Curtis Salgado, and, as a nod to Salgado, Cab Calloway’s character in the film is named Curtis. The Blues Brothers’ set list was strikingly similar to the shows Salgado was delivering on a nightly basis. As Salgado was getting more serious about his career, he realized some of his band mates were not. It was then that Salgado joined forces with Cray and formed a new, more forceful Robert Cray Band. As the stature of the group grew, Salgado found himself sharing stages with blues icons like Muddy Waters, Bobby Bland and Bonnie Raitt. The band performed a transcendent set at The 1977 San Francisco Blues Festival to thunderous ovation before backing up the great Albert Collins. After Salgado and Cray parted ways in 1982, Curtis went on to front Roomful Of Blues, singing and touring with them from 1984 through 1986. Back home in Oregon, he formed a new band, Curtis Salgado & The Stilettos, and was once again tearing it up on the club scene. He wrote many new songs, and honed his band to a razor’s edge before releasing his first solo album in 1991 on the fledgling JRS label. The group toured the country and began developing a strong following. His friend and fan Steve Miller invited Curtis and his band to open for him on a summer shed tour in 1992. Two years later, Salgado spent the summer on the road singing with Santana. In 1997 he toured with Miller again and performed in front of an audience of millions on NBC television’s Late Night With Conan O’Brien. Salgado then joined forces with Shanachie Records in 1999, putting out four critically acclaimed albums over the next nine years and finding his biggest audience yet. In 2006 Salgado was sidelined when he underwent a successful liver transplant and then shortly afterwards was diagnosed with and then beat lung cancer. Like so many musicians, Curtis had no health insurance. His medical expenses were paid for in part by a huge outpouring of love and money from his fellow musicians and his huge Northwest fan base. He bounced back with a perfect bill of health in 2008, releasing Clean Getaway. Billboard said the album was a “tour-de-force, showcasing Salgado’s range and power as a vocalist” and that it featured “hard-nosed blues, beautifully nuanced phat and funky R&B.” Blues Revue called it “one of the best records of the year.” With his latest release, Soul Shot, Salgado is ready for more, tougher and more focused than ever. This interview was held in Oakland, California in January of 2012. Videos include: Curtis’ Early Years, Part 1; Curtis’ Early Years, Part 2; Early Bands and Robert Cray Band; Early Influences Gary Smith, Rod Piazza and Paul deLay; Essential Listening; Roomful of Blues; Tongue; Blocking and Tongue Switching; Bending Control and Dynamics; Playing on the High End of the Harp; Music Theory and Band Communication; Improvising and Vocals; Accompaniment Playing; Curtis’ Equipment; Closing

    Scott Dirks. blues harmonica player, recording artist, producer, historian and author ("Blues with A Feeling, The Little Walter Story"). This interview was held in Chicago, Illinois in June of 2012. Videos include: Introduction & Scott’s Early Years; Scott’s Early Influences; Scott’s Early Bands and The Blues Brothers; Scott as Producer (Delmark and Alligator Records); Recommended Chicago Players; Scott’s Perspective on Modern; Approaches to Chicago Blues; Scott’s Approach to Technique (Tongue Blocking); Scott’s Perspective on What Chicago Blues is; Playing Cover Songs, Little Walter Session Tapes and Juke (Part 1); Juke (Part 2); Little Walter’s Equipment; Recording Tips (Part 1); Recording Tips (Part 2); Blues with a Feeling, the Little Walter Story: Walter’s Unmarked Grave; Blues with a Feeling, the Little Walter Story: Tony Glover & Ward Gaines; Blues with a Feeling, the Little Walter Story: Research & Interviews; Blues with a Feeling, the Little Walter Story: What Walter Gave the Blues Harmonica World

    Harmonica master, singer, songwriter Jim Liban was known throughout the midwest in the 1970's as the leader of Short Stuff, the innovative Milwaukee based ensemble that pioneered the blues & rock sound later identified with bands like the Fabulous Thunderbirds and Stevie Ray Vaughn. He continues to perform in a more traditional vein with his trio. He has international cult status as one of the foremost post-war blues harmonica stylists, and many of his original songs have been recorded by national blues artists like Johnny Winter and Lonnie Brooks. This interview was held in Chicago, Illinois in June of 2012. Videos include: Introduction & Jim’s Early Years, Part 1; Introduction & Jim’s Early Years, Part 2; Jim’s Early Influences; Recommended Players; Improvising: Use of Space; Improvising: Tonal Effects; improvising: Keeping Things Fresh on the Bandstand; Accompaniment Playing; 1st and 3rd Position Playing; Bending; Tongue Blocking; Minor Playing; Jim’s Equipment; What do you like to hear when listening to other players?; Closing Words & Play-out with Joe Filisko

    David Waldman. in his own words… “I grew up in Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y. I started playing harp when I was around 13 or 14. I moved to Chicago in 1976. The first person to hire me for a gig here was Louis Myers. His band didn’t show up at one of his club dates and I happened to be in the audience, so he hired me to help him out on harp. Starting in 1980, I played for long periods in the bands of both Taildragger (replacing Big Leon Brooks) and Big Smokey Smothers. My colleagues in Big Smokey’s band were Steve Cushing and Illinois Slim. We called ourselves the Ice Cream Men. The Taildragger gig was notable, among other reasons, for the fact that I got to play with some really great guitarists: Eddie Taylor (Sr.), Willie James Lyons, Hubert Sumlin, and, not least, James Scott, a superb and under-recognized guitarist who recorded for Sun records in the early 1950’s. It’s a tragedy that Scott wasn’t recorded more: he had some wonderful instrumentals with which he used to open the show. He had grown up on the same plantation as Tony Hollins, and he used to play some of Hollins’ pieces--very well, as I remember. In the summer of 1985, I toured with Jimmy Rogers, playing piano. Other members of the band were Big Smokey Smothers on guitar, Wild Child Butler on harp, Bob Stroger on bass, and Ted Harvey on drums. One highlight of this was appearing at the 10th anniversary celebration of Clifford Antone’s club in Austin. It seemed like virtually every major living Chicago blues figure was there, and the celebration lasted a week. It took me another week to come back down to reality. I also have fond memories of a month long tour that I did in Canada with the Legendary Blues Band in the late 1980s. At that time the band consisted of Willie Smith on drums, Billy Flynn and Little Smokey Smothers on guitars, and Calvin Jones on bass. From 1988 to 1992, I played guitar in a band that had a weekly gig at Lilly’s on North Lincoln. We specialized in getting old school Chicago blues figures to come out and front our band; among these were Big Wheeler, Little Willie Anderson, Joe Carter, Jimmy Lee Robinson, and John and Grace Brim. I played in the Chicago blues festival a number of times with this band; we backed up Jimmy Lee Robinson, John Brim, Big Wheeler, and on one occasion, Yank Rachell. I should also mention that on an earlier occasion, I played in the Chicago Blues Festival with Floyd Jones at what turned out to be his last public appearance. In the 90’s and in the first decade of this century, I played at Smokedaddy on many occasions with Billy Flynn’s band. Steve Cushing and I also had a regular Wednesday night gig there for awhile with Big Wheeler. I’ve recorded with Big Smokey Smothers, Big Wheeler, John Brim, Taildragger, Billy Flynn and Elmore James Jr. I consider myself fortunate to have seen a lot of the more obscure, old school harp players in Chicago: Big Wheeler, Middle Walter, Big Leon Brooks, Lester Davenport, Earring George Mayweather, Birmingham Jones, Louis Myers, Billy Boy Arnold, Harmonica George Robinson, Easy Baby, Little Addison, Dan Smith, etc. These men helped form my conception of what Chicago blues harp should sound like. My favorites were Willie Anderson and Louis Myers; Big Leon was also great. I’ve been involved in the University of Chicago Folk Festival since the early 1980’s and I’m proud of having played a role in bringing to Chicago a number of blues figures who might otherwise not have appeared here: George McCoy, Jesse Thomas, Jack Owens, Lavada Durst (i.e. Dr. Hepcat), Grey Ghost, and Mose Vinson. Since 1979 I’ve done a blues radio show on WHPK-FM (88.5FM). It runs from 9:00PM to midnight on Mondays.” This interview was held in Chicago, Illinois in June of 2012. Videos Include: David Waldman’s Early Years, Part 1; David Waldman’s Early Years, Part 2; David Waldman’s Early Years, Part 3; Essential Listening - Little Walter & Little Willie Anderson; Obscure Harp Player in Chicago; How Playing other Instruments has Helped David’s Harp Playing; David’s Thoughts on Tongue Blocking and Bending; David’s Approach to 1st Position Playing; David’s Approach to Improvising; David’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing; Recommended Do’s and Don’ts for Harp Players; What David Likes about the Chromatic Harmonica; What David Likes to Hear when Listening to Another Harp Player; Closing and Playing out with Scott Dirks

    Tad Robinson. AllMusic.com states about Tad, "Tad Robinson would have fit in snugly with the blue-eyed soul singers of the 1960s. His vocals virtually reeking of soul, he's capable of delving into a straight-ahead Little Walter shuffle or delivering a vintage O.V. Wright R&B ballad. Add his songwriting skills and exceptional harp technique and you have quite the total package. Robinson grew up in New York City on a nutritious diet of Stax, Motown, and Top 40, digging everyone from Otis Redding and Arthur Alexander to Eric Burdon and Joe Cocker. He matriculated at Indiana University's school of music in 1980, fronting a solid little combo on the side called the Hesitation Blues Band that made it up to Chicago now and then (where he soon relocated). Long respected locally, his reputation outside the city limits soared when he took over as vocalist with Dave Specter & the Bluebirds. Their 1994 Delmark disc, Blueplicity, was an inspiring marriage of Robinson's soaring vocals and Specter's tasty, jazz-laced guitar and featured the striking Robinson-penned originals "What's Your Angle," "Dose of Reality," and "On the Outside Looking In." Delmark granted Tad Robinson his own album later that year. One to Infinity escorted him even further into soul territory (guests on the set included Mighty Flyers guitarist Alex Schultz, the mystical Robert Ward, and Specter)." This interview was held in Chicago, Illinois in June of 2012. Videos Include: Tad's Early Years; Tad's Early Influences; Tad's Early Education and Gigging; Tad's Approach to Tongue Blocking and 3rd Position; Tad's Thoughts on 1st Position - Part 1; 1st Position - Part 2, Positions and Overbends; How to Keep Things Interesting on the Bandstand; How the Understanding of Music Theory Helps; Tad's Approach to Playing in Minor; Tad's Hand Usage; Tad's Equipment; What Tad Likes to Hear in Other Harp Players; Tad's Final Tips; Current Recordings and Closing; Bonus Footage: Tad Robinson, Jim Liban and David Barrett Play!

    Mitch Kashmar. a Long Beach California native, was directly influenced by West Coast blues harmonica legends George “Harmonica” Smith, Kim Wilson, William Clarke and Rod Piazza. I first became aware of his work through William Clarke in one of my favorite blues harmonica instrumental duets “Horn of Plenty” on his release “The Pontiax, 100 Miles To Go” and soon after a live performance at the JJ’s Blues Festival in San Jose, California. His tone, smooth vibrato and truly stellar harmonica playing in all three positions and the chromatic harmonica, make him one of my favorite players of all time. This interview was held in August of 2012 in Dallas, Texas. Videos Include: Mitch’s Early Years, Part 1; Mitch’s Early Years, Part 2; Mitch’s Recordings; Mitch’s Recommended Listening; Mitch on Vocals; Running Away from Harp Players; Mitch’s Approach to Improvising; Mitch on Chromatic Harmonica; How Mitch Keeps Interest in a Performance; Mitch on Accompaniment Playing; Mitch on 3rd Position; Mitch on 1st Position, Vibrato and Blow Bends; Mitch on Tongue Blocking; Mitch on Bending; How Music Theory has Helped Mitch’s Playing; Working the High End of the Harmonica; Mitch on Minor Playing; How Mitch Approaches Non-12 Bar Blues; Mitch’s Equipment; What Mitch Likes to Hear in other Harmonica Players; Where to Hear Mitch; Closing

    Join me for an interview with Kim Wilson. one of our most influential traditional blues harmonica player, vocalist and band leader of the past 40 years. This interview was held in Oakland, California in January of 2013. Videos include: Kim Wilson's Early Years, Part 1; Kim Wilson's Early Years, Part 2 - Technique and Conviction; Kim's Approach to Improvising; Kim's Approach to Accompaniment Playing, Part 1; Kim's Approach to Accompaniment Playing, Part 2; Kim’s Approach to Tongue Blocking; Kim’s Approach to 3rd Position Playing & Dynamics; Kim’s Approach to 1st Position Playing; Kim on Position Playing over Chord Changes; Kim’s Approach to Playing the Chromatic and Discussion on Monitors; Kim’s Approach to Playing in Minor and Changing Position in a Song; Kim’s Equipment: Harps and Mics; Kim’s Equipment: Stage Amps, Part 1; Kim’s Equipment: Stage Amps, Part 2; Kim’s Equipment: Using the Bullet Mic & Dynamics; Kim’s Equipment: Using the Bullet Mic & Delivery; Kim’s Equipment: Studio Recording, Part 1; Kim’s Equipment: Studio Recording, Part 2; Kim’s Equipment: Studio Recording, Part 3; Closing to Kim Wilson Interview; Kim Wilson Bonus Footage: Buddy Guy Pick Story and Kim Wilson Bonus Footage: Remembrances

    Charlie McCoy - There are numerous super-session musicians in Nashville, but very few with the longevity of Charlie McCoy. In addition to being a fixture in Nashville studios for 48 years, he also has his own recording career going full tilt. recording over 35 solo albums. He served as the music director for eighteen years for the syndicated television series “Hee Haw” and is a member of the Country Music Hall Of Fame. Charlie McCoy began working sessions in the early 60s, one of the first being “Candy Man” by Roy Orbison. “Forty nine dollars,” says Charlie. "That’s how much I was paid for that session back in 1961. It got Roy another hit and me a career. For a twenty year old to make $49 for three hours work back then, it was a dream." Shortly after the release of “Candy Man,” Charlie became one of the in-demand session players in Nashville. His session credits are literally a who’s who of country music. For a fifteen year stretch, he did more than 400 sessions a year, with a grand total of over 12,000. In the last twenty years, he has been touring more with many appearances in Europe and Japan. In addition to country sessions, Charlie was a mainstay on Elvis Presley recordings both in Nashville and Los Angeles. When Bob Dylan recorded “Highway 61,” “Blond On Blond,” “John Wesley Harding” and “Nashville Skyline,” Charlie was there, playing on these land-mark recordings. He was also heard on Simon and Garfunkle’s “The Boxer” in addition to many hits from genres other than country music. Charlie McCoy began recording for Monument Records in the late 60s and recorded 14 albums for the label, beginning with “The World Of Charlie McCoy.” He won the Grammy in 1972 for his album, “The Real McCoy.” He won CMA’s “Instrumentalist Of The Year” two times and the Academy Of Country Music’s “Specialty Instrument Award” seven times. He is a member of the “International Musician’s Hall Of Fame” and the “West Virginia Music Hall Of Fame.” In addition to making his own recordings, Charlie was a member of a legendary recording band, “Area Code 615.” The band featured many of the top session players in Nashville. While Charlie predominately is known as a harmonica player, his musical prowess encompasses other instruments including guitar, bass, mallet percussion, (vibes, marimba, bells, Etc.), keyboards, and various wind instruments. Charlie has toured in Europe and Japan regularly since 1989 and has released albums in France, Denmark, Germany and the Czech Republic. In addition to “Hee Haw,” Charlie served as music director for other television shows including “The Colgate Country Showdown” and “The Arthritus Telethon.” He was in the house band for the TNN show “Music City Tonight” with Crook and Chase. Charlie was given the “Musician” award from the Reunion Of Professional Entertainers” in 1994, elected to the German-American Country Music Hall Of Fame in 1998, The Hall Of Fame of the North American Country Music Association International in 2000, the International Musicians’ Hall Of Fame and the Old Time Country Music Hall of fame in 2007, and the West Virginia Music Hall Of fame in 2008. On Feb. 4, 2009, it was announced that Charlie would be inducted into the Country Music Hall Of Fame along with Roy Clark and Barbara Mandrell. More information can be found about Charlie, including tour dates and new releases, at his website www.charliemccoy.com. Videos Include: Charlie McCoy’s Early Years; Charlie’s Essential Players to Listen To; Charlie’s Approach to Bending & Tongue Blocking; Charlie Demonstrates Country Tuning; Charlie’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing; Charlie’s Approach to Improvising; Charlie’s Vibrato & Why He Chooses to Play Primarily in 2nd Position; Charlie’s Approach to Minor Playing & Other Positions; Charlie’s Likes and Dislikes about Harp Players; Charlie Explaines the Nashville Number System; Charlie’s Personal Favorite Recordings; How Charlie Feels the Harmonica World Has Changed; Charlie’s Equipment: Harps; Charlie’s Equipment: Mics; How to Find Charlie’s Music; Charlie McCoy Interview Closing; Bonus Footage - Charlie McCoy Stories: Bob Dylan; Bonus Footage - Charlie McCoy Stories: Elvis Presley; Bonus Footage - Charlie McCoy Stories: Nancy Sinatra; Bonus Footage - Charlie McCoy Stories: Hee Haw; Bonus Footage - Charlie McCoy Stories: Touring Europe

    Join me for an interview with harmonica educator and author Phil Duncan. Videos include: Phil Duncan’s Early Years: Getting Started; ’s Early Years: Teaching; Phil Duncan’s Early Years: Writing for Mel Bay; Phil Duncan’s Style and Recommended Players to Listen To; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Improvising & Songwriting; Importance of Music Theory to the Harmonica Player; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Tongue Blocking; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Using Country Tuning; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Using Positions; Phil Duncan’s Approach to Using Valved Harmonicas; Phil Duncan’s Equipment & Closing

    Annie Raines was born in 1969 in Boston and grew up in the suburb of Newton, Massachusetts. She picked up the blues harp at 17 and made her stage debut at the 1369 Jazz Club in Cambridge a few months before her high school graduation. Enthralled by the recordings of Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Big Walter and Sonny Boy Williamson, she became a fixture at Boston area blues jams. She briefly attended Antioch College and 1988 interned with Washington, DC homeless rights activist Mitch Snyder, who persuaded her to drop out of school to pursue her musical career. One of the few female blues harmonica players in the country, Annie played the New England club circuit with local bands, and traveled to Chicago where she met and played with many of her musical idols including Pinetop Perkins, Louis Myers, and James Cotton. She also enjoyed yearlong stints with the Tarbox Ramblers and the Susan Tedeschi Band, going on to perform on Susan’s first three albums. She lives in Boston with her number one musical hero, Paul Rishell. This interview was conducted in Saint Louis, Missouri in August of 2013. To learn more about Annie visit: PaulandAnnie.com Videos Include: Annie’s Early Years, Part 1 - Introduction; Annie’s Early Years, Part 2 - C.H.O. and Rhythm Harp; Annie’s Early Years, Part 3 - Paul Rishell; Annie’s Early Years, Part 4 - Magic Harps; Importance of Music Theory to Annie; Annie’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing, Part 1; Annie’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing, Part 2; Annie’s Approach to Improvising; Annie on Tongue Blocking, Puckering and U-Blocking; Annie on Bending; Annie’s Approach to 3rd Position; Annie on Positions and John Sebastian Story; Annie’s Approach to Minor Playing; Annie on the Value of Playing other Instruments; Annie on Tone and Hand Usage; Annie’s Equipment; Closing to Annie Raines Interview

    Winslow Yerxa is a harmonica player, performer, author, inventor, and teacher centered in San Francisco, California. His lifelong quest to understand the harmonica (and help others do the same) began early on, when he couldn't find a teacher and had to figure everything out the hard way. Winslow has authored the books Harmonica For Dummies and Blues Harmonica For Dummies and is a forum expert here are BluesHarmonica.com. Other notable writing activities include publishing the magazine HIP (Harmonica Information Press), transcribing John Popper's harmonica solos for publication, contributing to Howard Levy's “Out of the Box” instructional DVD and the Howard Levy Harmonica School, as well as writing a regular column for Mel Bay's online eZine HarmonicaSessions.com. As a performer, Winslow plays nearly every type of harmonica, in addition to composing, arranging and conducting. Currently he performs with the San Francisco Harmonica Ensemble, in a duo with violinist Tuula Tossavainen, and small acoustic ensembles. Winslow currently teaches at the Jazzschool in Berkeley, California and for the semi-annual gatherings of the Harmonica Collective. He has also taught at David Barrett's Harmonica Masterclass and Jon Gindick's Harmonica Jam Camp. Winslow is currently president of SPAH (the Society for the Preservation and Advancement of the Harmonica). This interview was held at School of the Blues in San Jose California in January of 2014. Videos Include: Winslow’s Early Years, Part 1 - The Start; Winslow’s Early Years, Part 2 - Stylistic Approach; Winslow’s Early Years, Part 3 - SPAH; Winslow’s Early Years, Part 4 - HIP; Winslow’s Early Years, Part 5 – Discrete Comb: Bends & Overbends Defined; Winslow’s Early Years, Part 6 – Discrete Comb, XB40 and X-Reed Harmonicas; Winslow’s Approach to Tongue Blocking, Part 1; Winslow’s Approach to Tongue Blocking, Part 2; Winslow’s Approach to Bending, Part 1; Winslow’s Approach to Bending, Part 2; Winslow’s Approach to Blow Bending; Winslow’s Approach to Minor Playing, Part 1; Winslow’s Approach to Minor Playing, Part 2; Winslow’s Approach to Improvising; Importance of Music Theory to Winslow; Winslow’s Approach to Accompaniment Playing; Winslow’s Approach to 1st Position Playing; Winslow’s Approach to 3rd Position Playing; Winslow on other Styles and Positions; Winslow on the Chromatic Harmonica, Part 1: Tuning, Construction & Common Positions; Winslow on the Chromatic Harmonica, Part 2: Positions & Enharmonic Slide Usage; Winslow on the Bass Harmonica; Winslow on the Chord Harmonica and Harmonetta; Winslow on the Tremolo Harmonica; Closing to Winslow Yerxa Interview

    Born in 1945 in New London, Connecticut, Magic Dick arrived in post-war America to the Atomic Bomb, World Peace, Bebop and Rhythm & Blues. Dynamic change and growth in the arts and technology would be the hallmark of this era and by the time he was eight Dick knew that music, painting and physics would be his primary interests. The trumpet was his constant companion and served as a springboard to the harmonica in his sophomore year at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts where he met J. Geils and Danny Klein and became a founding member of the J. Geils Blues Band in 1968. By 1969 the band had moved to Boston and joined forces with Peter Wolf, Stephen Jo Bladd and Seth Justman. In 1970 the J. Geils Band recorded their first of nine albums for Atlantic Records and toured incessantly, jamming with many of the blues greats including Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, Junior Wells and James Cotton. The band developed a reputation for 'getting crazy' and devastated audiences for fifteen years with their high-energy style of Rhythm & Blues and Rock & Roll. These recordings showcase Magic Dick's innovative harmonica playing, which served as a strong distinguishing sound for the band. A series of five albums for EMI America followed culminating in the Platinum album Freeze Frame, released in 1981, which ascended to #1 on the Billboard album charts, spent four weeks there, and remained on the charts for a total of 70 weeks. The album's first single, "Centerfold," spent six weeks at #1 in Billboard. Freeze Frame's title track followed "Centerfold," peaking at #4. Subsequent to The J. Geils Band, Magic Dick performed as a guest artist harmonica soloist for Patty Smyth, Debbi Harri, Full Circle, The Del Fuegos and Ryuici Sakamota, among others. In 1992, Magic Dick and J. Geils formed the band Bluestime featuring Magic Dick on harmonica and vocals and J. Geils on guitar. Magic Dick's years of experimentation and searching for new sounds and stylings for the harmonica cultivated a strong desire to improve the flexibility and quality of the harmonica so as to better fit into contemporary music yet retain the best characteristics of harmonica sound and cultural history. This development continues to this day in the recordings of Bluestime on Rounder Records, which feature prototypes of Magic Harmonicas’ expanding the role of the harp now, and for the future. Magic Dick's intense drive to extend and enlarge the cultural history of the harmonica is shared in a balanced and fruitful union with Magic Harmonicas co-inventor and partner Pierre Beauregard. Magic Dick co-wrote and performed one of the most iconic blues harmonica instrumentals in the later part of the 20th Century, "Whammer Jammer," inspiring many people to learn blues harmonica. This interview was held at Magic Dick's home in Massachusetts, in February of 2014. If you would like to learn more about Magic Dick please visit his website http://magicdick.com Videos Include: First Harmonica and Perspective on Playing); Ensemble Playing; Improvising; Recording: Working with an Engineer; Recording: Value of Self-Recording and Mics; Recording: Amps; Harmonica Maintenance; Dick’s Shure Wireless Mic; Playing Trumpet, Part 1; Playing Trumpet, Part 2 and Mental Checklist; Achieving Big Tone on the Harmonica; Thought Experiments; Breathing; More on the Mental Checklist; Love of Post-War Chicago Blues and Hand Usage; Seeing James Cotton and Junior Wells Early on and Dick’s Stage Rig; Dick’s Approach to Tongue Blocking & Puckering; Inspiration; Bending and Incorporating Elements of other Players; More on Improvising: Stream of Consciousness; More on Improvising: Oral Language, Positions and Alternate Tunings; Magic Harps; Whammer Jammer, Part 1; Whammer Jammer, Part 2; Whammer Jammer, Part 3; Closing

    Mark Ford had a strong impact on the Bay Area blues harmonica scene in the early 1970’s, starting with the release of the Charles Ford Blues Band on Arhoolie in 1972, which is now considered a modern blues classic (Robin Ford on guitar, Patrick Ford on drums and Stan Poplin on the bass). His powerful amplified tone and mastery of the entire range of the harmonica (he’s known for his killer licks above Hole 6 in 2nd Position) has caused him to influence many generations of blues harmonica players around the world. At the end of this interview I was fortunate to get Gary Smith to swing by and talk with Mark on camera about the old days. Videos include: Early Influences; The Charles Ford Blues Band; Current Music; The Influence of Charlie Musselwhite and Gary Smith; Approach to Improvising; Accompaniment Playing; Tongue and U-Blocking; Bending; High End Playing; Position Playing; Playing in Minor; Playing another Instrument; Singing; Keeping Things Fresh on the Bandstand; Playing the Chromatic Harmonica and Brazil; Tribute to Paul Butterfield CD; Equipment: Harps and Mic; Equipment: Effects & Amp; Closing to Mark Ford Interview; Bonus Footage: Gary Smith and Mark Ford - The Early Years, Part 1; Bonus Footage: Gary Smith and Mark Ford - The Early Years, Part 2

    Big Al Blake. born as Alan Blake Eliel, shot into the world January 16, 1945 on a marine corps base near Klamath Falls, Oregon. While later growing up during the early 50s in Oklahoma, the Blues began tugging at his heart under the influence of his black nanny Ruby Anderson. She used to pack him over to the other side of the tracks where her small house sat nestled near Oklahoma City. Down the street from Ruby's house was a small general store where a hi-fi, with a large outdoor speaker, loudly played the Deep Southern Blues while people listened and danced there on a daily basis. Fascinated by this music, Al Blake began collecting all the great Blues recordings he could find. But finally just listening to all this musical magic was not enough and over time he began seeking out these living artists as mentors and with each personal experience of being able to watch their body language as he listened, both his understanding of them and his empathy blazed his own musical fires to higher and higher levels. Today Al Blake still walks the paths of those early mentors with a near-sacred need to preserve their tradition and avoid selling out to the aberrations of so many modern Blues-makers. His music is slowly evolving to the status of legend. Blake has said, "If the kind of Blues I'm so passionate about playing was a 4-legged mammal, it would be on the top of the endangered species list. It's that rare." People now consider Blake with his encyclopedic knowledge of the Blues and its players to be one of the most serious students of this genre. His extraordinary vision and unique talents as a vocalist, harmonica player, guitar player, writer and producer have led him to create some of the deepest and purest Blues of the post-modern era. Along with "Rock This House," the seminal recording by the Hollywood Fats Band, released in 1979, Blake has also recorded these collections with fellow members of the Hollywood Blue Flames: "Mr. Blake's Blues," and "Dr. Blake's Magic Soul Elixir." Since 2004 they have had three releases on the Delta Groove music label. Two of these being nominated for the Prestigious Blues Music Award by the Keeping the Blues Alive Foundation. Soul Sanctuary (2004) – Best Comeback Album of the Year. Road to Rio - 2 CD set, The Hollywood Blue Flames/ Larger Than Life Vol 1 The Hollywood Fats Band Live 1980 (2006) Best Historical Album of the Year which went to #1 on the Living Blues radio charts in the first two weeks of its release. Their latest, 2 CD set Deep in America, The Hollywood Blue Flames / Larger Than Life Vol 2 The Hollywood Fats Band Live 1980(2010) was on the Living Blues charts for 4 months with a peak position of #1. This interview was conducted at School of the Blues in San Jose, CA in July of 2014. Videos Include: Growing Up in Oklahoma and Record Collecting (Al Blake Interview); Moving to California (Al Blake Interview); Formation of Hollywood Fats Band (Al Blake Interview); Harmonica Mentors (Al Blake Interview); Blues Harp Lesson Experiences (Al Blake Interview); Hollywood Fats Band & Recording (Al Blake Interview); Hollywood Fats Band Record Release & Death of Fats (Al Blake Interview); Accompaniment Playing, John Lee Williamson & Little Walter (Al Blake Interview); Approach to Improvising (Al Blake Interview); Approach to Tongue Blocking (Al Blake Interview); Bending (Al Blake Interview); Recommendation on Obscure Players (Al Blake Interview); Position Playing (Al Blake Interview); How Guitar Influences Al’s Playing (Al Blake Interview); What Al Likes to Hear in Other Blues Harp Players, Part 1 (Al Blake Interview); What Al Likes to Hear in Other Blues Harp Players, Part 2 (Al Blake Interview); Al’s Equipment (Al Blake Interview); Recording Acoustic Harp (Al Blake Interview); Newest Recordings and Closing (Al Blake Interview)

    Singer, songwriter, and performer, Rob Roy Parnell has been mixing rockin' blues, boogie woogie, R&B and soul for over thirty years playing for audiences throughout the United States. Parnell was born into a music family. His father played guitar and sang in vaudeville shows as a kid. His mom was an opera singer. Bob Wills was a family friend and had a great influence on Parnell’s desire to play music. As a young man he first played trumpet, excelling as a jazz improvantionists receiving awards at jazz festivals for his solos in jazz performances. At age seventeen his brother Lee Roy (www.leeroyparnell.com) introduced Rob Roy Parnell to the harmonica. With the encouragement of his friend Jack Pearson (guitarist for the Allman Brothers Band), Parnell played harmonica in front of an audience live for the first time at the age of 18. As a sophomore in college Parnell began supporting his self though school playing country and blues harp in bands. During the 1990s Parnell worked as a sidemen for Lee Roy traveling the United States playing with many great acts such as Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Vince Gill, Brooks and Dunn, Patty Loveless, Hal Ketchum, Travis Tritt, Martina McBride, New Grass Revival, Hank Williams Jr. just to name a few. At the end of the 1990s Parnell desired to work on his own material and put together a band and began performing with some of Austin, TX most notable musicians. In 1999 Parnell released “Jacksboro Highway” which featured his friend Waylon Jennings performing some of his last recorded work before his passing. Over the years Parnell has played all over the United States and was the first performer to play for the Armed Forces at camp delta at “Gitmo” Cuba. For 11 straight years he has played before the University of Texas and University of Oklahoma Red River Shoot Out game and has become part of this long standing tradition at America’s largest state fair. He remains busy touring, songwriting and session work in the studio. One of his songs was recently cut and will be on the new Delbert McClinton CD with Jimmie Vaughn playing guitar on the cut. For seven years now, he has been part of the teaching staff at the Kerrville Folk Festival’s harmonica workshop serving as the musical director of the workshop. In addition, Parnell has played with some of the harmonica greats including Kim Wilson, James Cotton, Sam Meyers, Norton Buffalo, Delbert McClinton, Gary Primich, Peter “Mad Cat” Ruth, Adam Gussow, Mickey Raphael, Jimmy Hall, Tom Ball, Jimi Lee, Michael Rubin, Sonny Boy Terry, Dave Nevling and many others. Videos Include: Rob Roy’s Early Years; Rob Roy’s Recordings; Songwriting; Accompaniment Playing; Tongue Blocking and Words of Encouragement; Bending; 1st Position Playing; 3rd Position Playing; Music Theory; What Rob Likes to Hear in Other Harmonica Players; Rob Roy’s Harps; The Kerrville Folk Festival; Closing

    Mike Caldwell might just be the best-kept secret on the harmonica scene today. Never having pursued a solo career, he's relatively unknown except to the lucky few who have had the pleasure of hearing him live. Born and raised in Templeton California, Mike taught himself to play Charlie McCoy songs note-for-note, starting at age thirteen. Local western swing singer Monte Mills gave Mike his first break as a regular member of the band at age fifteen. This blend of jazz, country, bluegrass and rock required Mike to accurately navigate complex melodies, harmonies and chord progressions from the very outset of his musical journey. The country and swing chord progressions were the perfect vehicle to experiment with Charlie’s flowing melodic lines and fills. Mike’s older band mates introduced him to the recordings of other harp greats like Toots Theilmans, Norton Buffalo, Paul Butterfield and Stevie Wonder which enriched Mike's own emerging style. At age eighteen Mike went on the road for a national tour with a country vocal quartet named "The Shoppe." As fate would have it, the Shoppe’s next record was being produced by Mike’s idol Charlie McCoy. Mike didn’t expect to play since Charlie was at the sessions but after hearing Mike, Charlie said "You play great, man! I'll play the bass and you play harp." Mike still considers that moment to be one of the all-time highlights of his career. Mike’s Guardian Angel: Charlie McCoy Mike first met Charlie backstage at a county fair performance. Charlie heard Mike play and jokingly told him to “Stay out of Nashville.” Mike has had the good fortune of having his idol as his mentor ever since. When Charlie asked Hohner to give Mike a listen, he was signed as an endorser. Two years later Mike received an unexpected call from Loretta Lynn's bandleader saying “Charlie told me Loretta should hire you.” Over the next 10 years, Mike logged hundreds of thousands of miles with the Coal Miner's Daughter, performing around the world and making dozens of television appearances on "Hee Haw," " Nashville Now" and "The Opry Live" just to name a few. Along the way on the country touring circuit, Mike also had the opportunity to play with many other country legends including Conway Twitty, George Jones and Boxcar Willie. In 1994 Loretta took some time off the road. Mike was immediately approached by the producer of the "Country Tonite Show," a Las Vegas-based production which was enjoying a hugely successful eleven-year run at The Aladdin Hotel and Casino. The show was doing so well in Vegas that the owners were expanding to open a new venue in Dolly Parton's hometown of Pigeon Forge Tennessee. Mike has been wowing crowds at 340 performances each year with “Country Tonite” ever since as the Music Director and as a featured instrumentalist. Videos Include: Mike’s Early Years (Mike Caldwell Interview); Mike’s Approach to Music and His Equipment (Mike Caldwell Interview); Position Playing (Mike Caldwell Interview); Humility Story (Mike Caldwell Interview); Mike’s Early Influences (Mike Caldwell Interview); Mike’s Performances and Recordings (Mike Caldwell Interview); Improvising and Music Theory (Mike Caldwell Interview); Accompaniment Playing, Part 1 (Mike Caldwell Interview); Accompaniment Playing, Part 2 (Mike Caldwell Interview); Tongue Blocking (Mike Caldwell Interview); Bending (Mike Caldwell Interview); Horn Lines and Non-Standard Chord Changes (Mike Caldwell Interview); Speed Playing (Mike Caldwell Interview); James Cotton Story and Common Language in Music (Mike Caldwell Interview); Minor Playing (Mike Caldwell Interview); Chromatic Harmonica (Mike Caldwell Interview); The Value of Music Theory (Mike Caldwell Interview); Closing Comments (Mike Caldwell Interview)

    Harmonica player Will Scarlett has been described as outstanding, original, cosmic, visionary, unconventional and pioneering. Since the mid-1960s, Will Scarlett has played with a wide range of musicians and in a host of different musical styles. He collaborated regularly with guitar virtuoso Steve Mann and toured with folk blues master Brownie McGhee. He recorded with Hot Tuna (an offshoot of the Jefferson Airplane), the bluegrass group Old and in the Way, legendary guitarist Dave Bromberg, folksinger Rosalie Sorrels, mandolinist and composer David Grisman and guitar singer cult hero Jerry Garcia. He has performed with Zydeco accordion players Clifton Chenier, Andre Carriere, Andre Thierry, and Buckwheat Zydeco and French-Boss Nova-Latin-Jazz-Folk guitarist Albert Benichou, among others. Born in New Hampshire in 1948 and raised since the age of 2 in Berkeley, CA, He played bugle in elementary school and trombone in junior high school, and sang in a church choir. Harmonica playing took the front seat sometime during high school and has been driving ever since. Will’s musical career took off in 1966 when he hooked up with Dan Paik, Carlin Arriola, “Dynamite” Annie Johnson, Hank Bradley, Phil Marsh, and Richard Saunders to form the Cleanliness (is Next to) Godliness Skiffle Band. They served as the house band for the legendary Jabberwock Club in Berkeley (predecessor to the now famous Freight and Salvage). At the time, Will was the live-in janitor for the Jaberwock and Dan Paik was the club’s manager. A “freight train” style rhythm harmonica player, Will credits Dan with teaching him 12-bar blues. In the crazy heat of 1967, Will Scarlett played the Berkeley Folk Festival at the Greek Theater with the Skiffle Band. The following year, Scarlett accompanied Brownie McGhee on a six-week tour of eastern Canada (filling in for the ailing Sonny Terry). Will’s fond memories of the tour include a show at Le Hibou that was filmed by the CBC and a chance to play “Blackwater Blues” with Brownie and Lonnie Johnson. Returning to the Bay Area, Will was asked by Jorma Kaukonen to play and record with him and Jack Cassady during twelve consecutive shows at New Orleans House in Berkeley. Will’s harmonica graces the first two Hot Tuna albums, where he can be heard overblowing a single G Hohner Navy Band harmonica in all keys. Will played on Dave Bromberg’s first two albums (the song “Delia’s Gone” is a particular beauty). On folksinger Rosalie Sorrels’ album “Traveling Lady,” Will played “Lovin’ of the Game” in the key of A Flat on his G harmonica. He appeared with the band Old and in the Way at the Keystone in Berkeley, and provided harmonica on their soundtrack to the Angie Dickenson film “Big, Bad Mama.” The years have brought gigs and collaborations with blues, jazz, folk, bluegrass, rock, traditional and old time musicians too numerous to list. Among those highlights, Will had the opportunity to sit in and play with musicians Rev. Gary Davis, Doc Watson, Lonnie Johnson, Doug Kirshaw and many others. Reading Helmholtz’s “On The Sensations of Tone” led Will to explore music science and the system of tuning known as just intonation. Which in turn, prompted Will to study with composer, theorist and eccentric musician Harry Parch at UCSD. (A note to the musically literate: Parch’s instruments included the 11th and 13th harmonics, a tuning that Will applied to his G harmonica in ’72). Will is always happy to share his experiences and pass forward his knowledge. In 1973, he helped lead a songwriting workshop at the Berkeley Blues festival with T-Bone Walker and Luther Allison. As recently as 2009, he took part in workshops with Joe Filisko at the SPAH (Society for the Preservation and Advancement of Harmonica) Convention. Today, Will teaches harmonica by appointment, records with a variety of musicians, and performs throughout the Bay Area. Videos Include: Early Years, Part 1; Early Years, Part 2; Discovering Overbends, Part 1; Playing with Hot Tuna; Will’s Hand and Mic Usage; Will’s Third Reed Design; Overbends, Part 2; Tongue Blocking and Bending; Positions and Tuning; Closing; Bonus Footage: Brownie McGhee Story

    Andy Santana is a long-respected tradition blues harmonica player, guitarist and vocalist from the California Bay Area. In this interview he brings the perspective of a longtime performer, songwriter, recording artist, bandleader and producer. Videos Include: Andy’s Early Years, Part 1; Andy’s Early Years, Part 2; Learning from Recordings; Developing Listening Skills, Part 1; Developing Listening Skills, Part 2; Accompaniment Playing; Tips for Crowd Interaction; Approach to Improvising, Part 1; Approach to Improvising, Part 2; Instrumental Songwriting; Tongue Blocking; Phrasing and Emotion; Choosing Bandmates, Part 1; Choosing Bandmates, Part 2; Bending; 3rd Position; 1st Position; Blues Chromatic; Minor Playing; Dealing with Non-12 Bar Blues Chord Changes; Andy’s Stage Equipment; Andy’s Studio Equipment; Closing; Bonus Footage: Artist Stories and Being a Music Sponge; Bonus Footage: Sonny Terry Story and Sharing; Bonus Footage: Gag Show with Aki Kumar

    Todd Parrott has not played with an exhaustive list of famous musicians nor toured to the point that he’s a household name, so his bio really doesn't do him justice. He’s a highly skilled musician and in the harmonica community respected as a heavy-hitter… “One of the tastiest and most accomplished overblow players around today." Brendan Power "Todd Parrott is one of the freshest, most innovative and proficient harp players I know. He's got it all: great chops, killer tone, speed, finesse, and impeccable taste. Todd plays with a sensibility and maturity that lets me know he is first and foremost a great musician who never sacrifices musicality for mere technique. And he genuinely loves sharing whatever knowledge he has with the rest of the harmonica community out there. I'm excited to see his star rising." Buddy Greene "Todd Parrott works the upper octave blues scale in a straight-ahead blues/gospel vein better than anybody out there, IMO. He's very fast, gets all the notes (overblows and overdraws), and, most importantly, makes it all sound very soulful. Todd's too modest to say this, but I think he's got the best chance of any harmonica player I've seen to cross over and become the public sound and image of what pure-D American blues harmonica is about: unamped, very little tongue-blocking, just straight-up, stand-at-the-mic-and-blow-hell-out-of-it stuff. Sweet, strong, soulful, and clear. He's definitely modern, in technical terms--all those overdraws and overblows, some of them bent and/or held and vibratoed--but his tonality is straight down the middle of the blues/gospel/country road. Most listeners won't hear "modern." They'll just hear "great!" Todd should be center stage at the Grand Ol' Opry, he should be the first-call studio guy in Nashville and L.A. he should be all over movie and TV soundtracks. He's really got it. One reason among many that he's got it is that he makes huge use of the upper octave blues scale. " Adam Gussow Videos Include: Todd’s Early Years; Tongue Blocking Split Intervals; Importance of Understanding Music; Recommendations to Students for Learning Music Theory; Accompaniment Playing; Improvising and Songwriting; Developing Bending Skills; Playing in Minor; 1st Position; 3rd Position; Overbending, Part 1; Overbending, Part 2; Closing

    TJ Clay. a Hohner Harmonica Artist for the past 16 years, TJ was featured on the Hohner Harmonica Artist Calendar along with Howard Levy, Delbert McClinton and Aerosmith's Steven Tyler. TJ was an original member of the country rock band Western Flyer. His Western Flyer days included two CDs, four hit singles, three CMT videos, ten TV appearances, and performances at the Kansas City Royal's season openers, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Foundation, and a White House whistle stop tour gig for President Clinton. His session work has included numerous albums and CDs and jingles for Hardee's, McDonald's, Coors Lite, Jack Daniel's, Bugaboo Creek, Tonka Toys and other national and international brands. He's also jammed with the best, including Michael McDonald, FireFall, Stevie Winwood, Delbert McClinton, John Prine and Jerry Lee Lewis. His song, "I Chose You" was a number one single on the Positive Country Charts. Solo CDs include Right On Target, All Kinds of People and Keep on Harpin’. Videos Include: TJ’s Early Years; Tongue Blocking and Positions; Overbending; Gear; Music Theory and Charlie McCoy Songs; Studio Recording and Accompaniment Playing; Improvising; Approaching Playing in Minor; Playing Guitar and Harmonica in a Rack; 3 Draw Bends; Closing

    Michael Rubin is a respected member of the harmonica education community and often brings unique insights to the approach of playing the instrument. Michael plays many styles of music and models of harmonica, so if your taste in music is varied, you'll really enjoy this interview. Videos include: Michael’s Early Years; Transcribing and Playing in All 12 Positions; Accompaniment Playing; Improvising; Value of Music Theory; Minor Playing; 3rd Position on both Diatonic and Chromatic; 1st Position; 4th and 5th Position; Mental Preparation for Performance; Different Types of Harmonicas; Closing

    Videos on the FAQ section get right to the point and answer the frequently asked questions from students.

    General Technique
    - My 2 draw and/or high-end notes sounds flat, airy or not at all!
    - My shakes suck!
    - Are tremolo, vibrato, shakes supposed to have a rhythm?
    - I can’t seem to play this lick in time!
    - I run out of breath so easily!
    - I want better tone!
    Bending
    - How can I tell if I'm bending to the right note?
    - My 3 draw goes right to the bottom (can’t get the whole step bend)!
    - I can't seem to get the 6 draw bend.
    - I can't get the blow bends either!
    Tongue Blocking
    - When should I pucker and when should I tongue block?
    - Can you bend with your tongue on the harmonica?
    - Why is it a good idea to learn how to tongue block bend if I can already pucker bend?
    Equipment
    - Is there any care and maintenance I should use on my harmonicas?
    - My harps blow out so fast!
    - I'm not getting the amplified tone I want.
    - How to I set up my amp?
    - What equipment (mics, amps, pedals, etc.) do you recommend?
    - What equipment do YOU use?
    - How do you set up your amp on stage?
    Administration
    - Do you offer one-on-one video lessons?
    - Why don't you have study songs of famous blues harmonica songs?
    - What should I use to audio record my lessons for submission?
    - Can I submit a non-study song?

    CONTRIBUTORS

    MARK HUMMEL
    Join world-renown harmonica player and producer Mark Hummel for a behind-the-scenes look at the life and times of a top professional harmonica player. In these videos you'll hear tips on the harmonica, stories from the road and be a fly on the wall at his legendary blues harmonica blowouts! If you would like to ask Mark a question visit the FORUM and post a question to "Ask Mark Hummel." Video submissions are as follows:
    - Intro to Mark Hummel part 1
    - Intro to Mark Hummel part 2
    - Submission #1 - Part 1 - Essential Recordings Part 1
    - Submission #1 - Part 2 - Essential Recordings Part 2
    - Submission #1 - Part 3 - Story of the Month
    - Submission #1 - Part 4 - Tip of the Month - Solo Harmonica Playing
    - Submission #2 - Part 1 - Behind the scenes at the Blues Harmonica Blowout Part 1
    - Submission #2 - Part 2 - Behind the scenes at the Blues Harmonica Blowout Part 2
    - Submission #3 - Part 1 - Behind the scenes at the Blues Harmonica Blowout Part 1
    - Submission #3 - Part 2 - Behind the scenes at the Blues Harmonica Blowout Part 2
    - Submission #3 - Part 3 - Behind the scenes at the Blues Harmonica Blowout Part 3
    - Submission #3 - Part 4 - Tip of the Month
    - Submission #4 - Part 1 - On the road, East Coast
    - Submission #4 - Part 2 - On the road, East Coast
    - Submission #4 - Part 3 - On the road, East Coast
    - Submission #5 - Part 1 - On The Road
    - Submission #5 - Part 2 - Magic Dick on Amps
    - Submission #5 - Part 3 - Magic Dick on Amp Tone
    - Submission #5 - Part 3 - Magic Dick on Changing Tone
    - Submission #5 - Part 3 - Magic Dick on Mics
    - Submission #6 - Part 1 - Acoustic Playing with Rusty Zinn
    - Submission #6 - Part 2 - Accompaniment Playing
    - Submission #6 - Part 3 - Performance Example
    - Submission #7 - Part 1 - How a guitarist should back a harp player with Rust Zinn
    - Submission #7 - Part 2 - How a guitarist should back a harp player
    - Submission #7 - Part 3 - How a guitarist should back a harp player
    - Submission #7 - Part 4 - How a guitarist should back a harp player, Playing Example
    - Submission #8 - How to make a set list
    - Submission #9 - How to Find and Select Blues Musicians
    - Submission #10 - Rick Estrin & Mark Hummel on Instrumental Writing
    - Submission #10 - Rick Estrin & Mark Hummel on Song Writing, Pt 1
    - Submission #10 - Rick Estrin & Mark Hummel on Song Writing, Pt 2
    - Submission #10 - Rick Estrin & Mark Hummel on Song Writing, Pt 3
    - Submission #11 - Dealing with Feedback, Part 1
    - Submission #11 - Dealing with Feedback, Part 2
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 1 "Ready, Steady, Roll"
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 2 "High Steppin' Again"
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 3 "Trial By Fire"
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 4 "Harpoventilating"
    - Submission #13 - Song Writing 5 "Humble Bug" Part 1
    - Submission #13 - Song Writing 5 "Humble Bug" Part 2
    - Submission #14 - Song Writing 5 "Summertime" Part 1
    - Submission #14 - Song Writing 5 "Summertime" Part 2
    - Submission #15 - Choosing Positions, Part 1
    - Submission #15 - Choosing Positions, Part 2
    - Submission #15 - Choosing Positions, Part 3
    - Submission #16 - Little Walter, Part 1
    - Submission #16 - Little Walter, Part 2
    - Submission #17 - Rice Miller, Part 1
    - Submission #17 - Rice Miller, Part 2
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Rehearsal
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Intro & George Bisharat's "Chromaticism"
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Steven Troch "Hanging out with Peter"
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Steve Molitor "Shim Sham Santa"
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Final Jam: Part 1
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Final Jam: Part 2
    - Submission #18 - King of Swing Concert, Winner Steven Troch
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: DeFord Bailey
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Pre-War Players & Sonny Terry
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: John Lee Williamson, Part 1
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: John Lee Williamson, Part 2 & Forest City Joe
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Little Walter & James Cotton
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Big Walter Horton
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: George Harmonica Smith & Junior Wells
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Rice Miller
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Junior Parker & Buster Brown
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Wells, Butterfield, Musselwhite & Cotton
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Reed, Arnold, Mysers, McCain & Williams
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Lesser-Known Players
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Modern Players, Part 1
    - Submission #19 - Harmonica History: Modern Players, Part 2
    - Submission #20 - Choosing Positions
    - Submission #21 - James Cotton & Junior Wells: Cotton, Part 1
    - Submission #21 - James Cotton & Junior Wells: Cotton, Part 2
    - Submission #21 - James Cotton & Junior Wells: Wells, Part 1
    - Submission #21 - James Cotton & Junior Wells: Wells, Part 2
    - Submission #21 - James Cotton & Junior Wells: Final Thoughts
    - Submission #22 - Constructing a Set List
    - Submission #23 - Acoustic Hand Techniques
    - Submission #24 - Mastering the Bandstand: Sparse Playing
    - Submission #24 - Mastering the Bandstand: Dynamics
    - Submission #24 - Mastering the Bandstand: Signaling
    - Submission #24 - Mastering the Bandstand: Fostering a Successful Band, Part 1
    - Submission #24 - Mastering the Bandstand: Fostering a Successful Band, Part 2
    - Submission #25 - Cupping the High End of the Harmonica, Part 1
    - Submission #25 - Cupping the High End of the Harmonica, Part 2
    - Submission #26 - Preparing for the Studio, Part 1
    - Submission #26 - Preparing for the Studio, Part 2
    - Submission #26 - Preparing for the Studio, Part 3
    - Submission #26 - Preparing for the Studio, Part 4
    - Submission #27 - The Writing of Big Road Blues

    AKI KUMAR
    Follow newly professional harmonica player Aki Kumar in his journey to becoming the next great blues harmonica player! In these videos he'll share the ins and outs of what it takes to be successful in the world of blues music. Expect insight on how he prepares for shows and generally see an inside look on the trials and tribulations of an upcoming artist. If you would like to ask Aki a question visit the FORUM and post a question to "Ask Aki Kumar" Video submissions are as follows:
    - Aki Kumar Intro (2 videos)
    - Submission #1 (3 videos) - Getting ready for a road trip & On the road rehearsing with a band
    - Submission #2 (3 videos) - Advanced chromatic harmonica licks that lead to chord change
    - Submission #3 (5 videos) Experience in the recording studio & how to approach playing fills
    - Submission #4 - Part 1 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Andy Just
    - Submission #4 - Part 2 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Mics & Amps
    - Submission #4 - Part 3 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Kinya Pollard
    - Submission #4 - Part 4 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Dennis Gruenling #1
    - Submission #4 - Part 5 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Dennis Gruenling #2
    - Submission #4 - Part 6 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Dennis Gruenling #3
    - Submission #4 - Part 7 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Rod Piazza
    - Submission #4 - Part 8 - Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Rod Piazza & Dennis Gruenling
    - Submission #5 Part 1 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Welcome
    - Submission #5 Part 2 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Aki & Andy Santana
    - Submission #5 Part 3 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Joe Filisko, Song 1
    - Submission #5 Part 4 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Joe Filisko, Song 2
    - Submission #5 Part 5 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: David Barrett
    - Submission #5 Part 6 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Gary Smith
    - Submission #5 Part 7 Behind the Scenes at the Harmonica Masterclass Workshop: Grand Finale
    - Submission #6 - Studying Horn Players
    - Submission #6 - Introducing Joe Lempkowski
    - Submission #7 - Interview with Nick Clark, Part 1
    - Submission #7 - Interview with Nick Clark, Part 2
    - Submission #8 - Competing at the International Blues Challenge Part 1
    - Submission #8 - Competing at the International Blues Challenge Part 2
    - Submission #8 - Competing at the International Blues Challenge Part 3
    - Submission #8 - Competing at the International Blues Challenge Part 4
    - Submission #9 - Fender Hot Rod Deville Mod: Introduction
    - Submission #9 - Fender Hot Rod Deville Mod: King Amplification
    - Submission #9 - Fender Hot Rod Deville Mod: On the Bandstand
    - Submission #10 - Instrumental Writing with Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 1
    - Submission #10 - Instrumental Writing with Major Pentatonic Scale, Part 2

    JOE FILISKO
    Joe Filisko is bar-none the best blues harmonica instructor I have ever met. His understanding of post-war Chicago blues harmonica is unequaled and is the world’s leading expert on pre-war and country blues harmonica. Join Joe for his regular submissions to BluesHarmonica.com, covering everything from technique to his journeys on the road. Video submissions are as follows:
    - Playing Low-Tuned Harps Part 1
    - Playing Low-Tuned Harps Part 2
    - 18 Harmonica Insights Introduction
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #18 - Teaching
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #17 - Harmonica Care
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #16 - Great Players
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #15 - Repertoire
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #14 - Failing
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #13 - Memorization
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #12 - Recording Yourself
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #11 - Listening Accountability
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #10 - Playing & Practicing
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #9 - Exhale Push & Nose Push
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #8 - Dynamics
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #7 - Rhythm, Groove & The Sway
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #6 - Bending
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #5 - Tongue Blocking
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #4 - Relax & Breathe
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #3 - Posture
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #2 - Hands
    - 18 Harmonica Insights, #1 - Holding the Harmonica
    - 5 Types of Sound, Part 1
    - 5 Types of Sound, Part 2
    - Breathing Guide: Introduction
    - Breathing Guide: Breathing Range
    - Breathing Guide: Exhale Push
    - Breathing Guide: Key Points
    - Breathing Guide: Nose Breathing
    - Breathing Guide: Review
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Introduction
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Reasons #1 and #2
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Reasons #3 through #5
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Reasons #6 through #9
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Disadvantages
    - Tongue Blocking Guide: Closing Comments
    - Train Imitation: Why?
    - Train Imitation: Rules
    - Train Imitation: Whistles (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation with Joe Filisko - The Sway & 3 Gears
    - Train Imitation: Rhythm, Part 1 - Intro (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation: Rhythm, Part 1 - Tongue (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation: Rhythm, Part 2 - Cruising Speed (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation: Train Example - Basic (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation: Train Example - Including Effects (A Harmonica)
    - Train Imitation: Dynamics
    - Train Imitation: Hand Tone
    - Train Imitation: All Three Together - Dynamics, Head Tone & Hand Tone
    - Train Imitation: Steam
    - Train Imitation: Effects - Wheels Slipping
    - Train Imitation: Effects - Race between the Train & Model T Ford
    - Train Imitation: Effects - Dogs of the Fox Chase
    - Train Imitation: Effects - Trestle
    - Train Imitation: Rhythm - Variations
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - Palmer McAbee
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - Salty Holmes
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - George Bullet Williams
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - Edward Hazelton
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - William McCoy, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - William McCoy, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: Artist Study - William McCoy, Part 3
    - Train Imitation: DeFord Bailey, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: DeFord Bailey, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: DeFord Bailey, Part 3
    - Train Imitation: DeFord Bailey, Part 4
    - Train Imitation: D.H. Bert Bilbro, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: D.H. Bert Bilbro, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: El Watson, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: El Watson, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: Freeman Stowers, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: Freeman Stowers, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: Freeman Stowers, Part 3
    - Train Imitation: Freeman Stowers, Part 4
    - Train Imitation: Curley Fox, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: Curley Fox, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: Elder Roma Wilson
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 1 (Going Train Blues)
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 2 (John Henry)
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 3 (Dog Chase)
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 4 (Peg’s Fox Chase)
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 5 (Fast Freight Train)
    - Train Imitation: Peg Leg Sam, Part 6 (Final Thoughts)
    - Train Imitation: Sonny Terry, Part 1
    - Train Imitation: Sonny Terry, Part 2
    - Train Imitation: Sonny Terry, Part 3
    - Train Imitation: Big Walter Horton
    - Fax Chase: What Is It? Part 1
    - Fax Chase: What Is It? Part 2
    - Fax Chase: Guidelines and Tricks, Part 1
    - Fax Chase: Guidelines and Tricks, Part 2
    - Fax Chase: Guidelines and Tricks, Part 3
    - Fax Chase: Guidelines and Tricks, Part 4
    - Fax Chase: Rhythm Foundation Examples 1A through 1F
    - Fax Chase: Rhythm Foundation Examples 2A through 2F
    - Fax Chase: Rhythm Foundation Examples 3A through 3G
    - Fax Chase: Rhythm Foundation Examples 4A through 4G
    - Fax Chase: Closing Comments for Foundation Exercises

    GARY SMITH
    Check in here for words of wisdom from the Bay Area's blues harmonica legend Gary Smith. In these videos Gary will share tips, techniques and generally ramble on about anything pertaining to classic blues harmonica! If you would like to ask Gary a question visit the FORUM and post a question to "Ask Gary Smith." Video submissions are as follows:

    - Submission #1 - Equipment & Tip of the Month
    - Submission #2 - More Equipment & Tip of the Month
    - Submission #3 - Part 1 - Cupping the bullet mic
    - Submission #3 - Part 2 - Setting up your amp on stage and the studio
    - Submission #3 - Part 3 - Junior Wells story
    - Submission #4 - Part 1 - Leading a band with breaks
    - Submission #4 - Part 2 - Leading a band with breaks continued
    - Submission #4 - Part 3 - Leading a band in a slow blues and hand signals
    - Submission #5 - Part 1 - When, Where and Why Gary Tongue Blocks or Puckers
    - Submission #5 - Part 2 - Where Tongue Blockers May Want To Pucker
    - Submission #5 - Part 3 - Licks that Traverse the Range of the Harmonica Part 1
    - Submission #5 - Part 4 - Licks that Traverse the Range of the Harmonica Part 2
    - Submission #5 - Part 5 - Gary and David Jam with Licks that Traverse the Range of the Harmonica
    - Submission #6 - Part 1 - Gary's Favorite Openings and Endings, Part 1
    - Submission #6 - Part 2 - Gary's Favorite Openings and Endings, Part 1
    - Submission #7 - Part 1: Masking the Harp: Holes 1-2
    - Submission #7 - Part 2: Masking the Harp: Holes 1-3
    - Submission #7 - Part 3: Masking the Harp: Holes 1-4 and 1-5
    - Submission #7 - Part 4: Masking the Harp: Holes 1-6 and High End
    - Submission #7 - Part 5: Masking the Harp: Procession of Notes
    - Submission #8 - Improvising, Lick Development Part 1
    - Submission #8 - Improvising, Lick Development Part 2
    - Submission #9 - Improvising, Trading Four's
    - Submission #9 - Improvising, Trading Two's
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Intro
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Head & Hook
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Breaks
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Unison
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Instrumentation
    - Submission #10 - Song Writing 1, Final Thoughts
    - Submission #11 - Song Writing 2, "Your Cat Will Play" Part 1
    - Submission #11 - Song Writing 2, "Your Cat Will Play" Part 2
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 3, "Solid Sender", Part 1
    - Submission #12 - Song Writing 3, "Solid Sender", Part 2
    - Submission #13 - Song Writing 4, "Fog Town Swing"
    - Submission #14 - Song Writing 5, "The Walk"
    - Submission #15 - Song Writing 6, "Rocket Ride"
    - Submission #16 - Song Writing 7, "Just Blew Into Your Town"
    - Submission #17 - Song Writing 8, "South Bay Beatdown"
    - Submission #18 - Song Writing 9, Blues for Mr. B
    - Submission #19 - Song Writing 10, Chrome Bullet Boogie
    - Submission #20 - Song Writing 11, Too Late
    - Submission #21 - Song Writing 12, Minor Mambo
    - Submission #22 - Song Writing 13, Don't Let Go & Hard Times
    - Submission #23 - Song Writing 14, Minor Mambo [Rhumba]
    - Submission #24 - Song Writing 15, Way Back Home, So Disappointed & The Angels Listened In
    - Submission #25 - Song Writing 16, Midnight at 7 Bamboo
    - Submission #26 - Song Writing 17, Final Thoughts on Songwriting
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Gary's Tips
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Tramp in D - Part 1
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Tramp in D - Part 2
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Slow Blues in D with Chord Slides
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Flat Tire in D
    - Submission #27 - Accompaniment Playing 1, Slow Blues in Dm
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Intro & History
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Rhythmic Variations, Part 1
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Rhythmic Variations, Part 2
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Rhythmic Variations, Part 3
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Improvising, Part 1
    - Submission #28 - Playing the Tramp Groove: Improvising, Part 2
    - Submission #29 - Accompaniment Playing 2, Intro
    - Submission #29 - Accompaniment Playing 2, Shuffle in E
    - Submission #29 - Accompaniment Playing 2, Big Boss Man in E
    - Submission #29 - Accompaniment Playing 2, Swing in F - Part 1
    - Submission #29 - Accompaniment Playing 2, Swing in F - Part 2
    - Submission #30 - Accompaniment Playing 3, Weird Dream: Part 1
    - Submission #30 - Accompaniment Playing 3, Weird Dream: Part 2
    - Submission #30 - Accompaniment Playing 3, Funky Blues in G
    - Submission #30 - Accompaniment Playing 3, One Chord Groove in G
    - Submission #30 - Accompaniment Playing 3, Help Me Style Groove in Gm
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: History
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: Gary’s Approach and Breaks
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: Improvising, Part 1
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: Improvising, Part 2
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: Improvising, Part 3
    - Submission #31 - Rhumba: Gary Plays Out
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: How the Band Affects what We Play, Part 1
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: How the Band Affects what We Play, Part 2
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Starting the Band
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Blues Break
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Fragmentation
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Knowing What You Want in Music
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Sitting in with a Local Band
    - Submission #32 - Accompaniment Playing 4: Different Roles of a Harp Player
    - Submission #33 - Movement Exercises: Patterns Introduction
    - Submission #33 - Movement Exercises: Pattern 1
    - Submission #33 - Movement Exercises: Pattern 2
    - Submission #33 - Movement Exercises: Pattern 3
    - Submission #34 - Movement Exercises, Part 2: Intro & Junior Wells Lick
    - Submission #34 - Movement Exercises, Part 2: Junior Wells Lick, Part 2
    - Submission #34 - Movement Exercises, Part 2: Gary Smith Lick
    - Submission #34 - Movement Exercises, Part 2: Bass Lick
    - Submission #34 - Movement Exercises, Part 2: Bo Diddley Lick & Closing
    - Submission #35 - Accompaniment Lessons: Intro
    - Submission #35 - Accompaniment Lessons: I Want You With Me, Part 1
    - Submission #35 - Accompaniment Lessons: I Want You With Me, Part 2
    - Submission #35 - Accompaniment Lessons: I Want You With Me, Part 3
    - Submission #35 - Accompaniment Lessons: I Want You With Me, Gary Plays
    - Submission #35 - Closing
    - Submission #36 - Accompaniment Lessons: Can't Get Through to You, Part 1
    - Submission #36 - Accompaniment Lessons: Can't Get Through to You, Part 2
    - Submission #36 - Accompaniment Lessons: Can't Get Through to You, Part 3
    - Submission #37 - Accompaniment Lessons: Blues Creapin' Over Me, Part 1
    - Submission #37 - Accompaniment Lessons: Blues Creapin' Over Me, Part 2
    - Submission #37 - Accompaniment Lessons: Blues Creapin' Over Me, Part 3
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Intro
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: More on Approach
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Used To Be My Baby, Part 1
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Used To Be My Baby, Part 2
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Used To Be My Baby, Part 3
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Used To Be My Baby, Gary Plays
    - Submission #38 - Acc Lessons: Closing
    - Submission #39 - Acc Lessons: Intro & John Garcia
    - Submission #39 - Acc Lessons: Gary's Approach
    - Submission #39 - Acc Lessons: Baby What You Want
    - Submission #39 - Acc Lessons: How Long
    - Submission #40 - Welcome & Intro
    - Submission #40 - Acc Lessons: Baby What You Want Me To Do
    - Submission #40 - Acc Lessons: All the Love in the World, Part 1
    - Submission #40 - Acc Lessons: All the Love in the World, Part 2
    - Submission #40 - Acc Lessons: Cryin’ Hey, Part 1
    - Submission #40 - Acc Lessons: Cryin’ Hey, Part 2
    - Submission #41 - Welcome & New Gear
    - Submission #41 - Acc Lessons: A Thrill To Be Alive
    - Submission #41 - Acc Lessons: Joaquin Riley
    - Submission #41 - Acc Lessons: My Father’s Son
    - Submission #41 - Acc Lessons: They Call Me Monster Mike
    - Submission #41 - Acc Lessons: Everybody
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: One of those Days, Part 1
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: One of those Days, Part 2
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: One of those Days, Part 3
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: Searching for an Angel. Part 1
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: Searching for an Angel. Part 2
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: Mistakes & Recording Alternate Takes
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: Just Like a Fool
    - Submission #42 - Acc Lessons: Give Me Time
    - Submission #43 - Intros: From the I (one chord)
    - Submission #43 - Intros: Band in from the IV
    - Submission #43 - Intros: Hanging on the I
    - Submission #43 - Intros: From the Turnaround & Playing 12 Bars
    - Submission #43 - Intros: Free-Form
    - Submission #44 - Gear: Amp Settings
    - Submission #44 - Gear: Delay and Reverb
    - Submission #44 - Gear: Micing and Monitors
    - Submission #45 – Common Questions: Tone
    - Submission #45 – Common Questions: Two Types of Tone
    - Submission #45 – Common Questions: Bullet Mic Technique
    - Submission #45 – Common Questions: Vibrato & Flutter
    - Submission #45 – Common Questions: Band
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Intro
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Memorizing Licks
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Bassman Chronicles
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Vintage Jensen 12s
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Who (If Anybody) Do You Play For?
    - Submission #46 – Answers: How to Prepare for Improvising at Jam Sessions
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Where to Start
    - Submission #46 – Answers: Hand Position
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Playing with a Loud Band
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Using a Vocal Mic
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Micing Your Amp
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Using Monitors
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Using a Wireless
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Stage Presence
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Dealing with Feedback
    - Submission #47 – Answers: Cupping the Chromatic
    - Submission #47 – Practice Observations: Creating Deep Tone
    - Submission #47 – Practice Observations: Playing Lighter
    - Submission #47 – Closing
    - Submission #48 – Tip: Having Basic Ideas Before Jamming
    - Submission #48 – Tip: Keep Growing as a Player
    - Submission #48 – Tip: Dig In
    - Submission #48 – Tip: Harmonized 2 Draw
    - Submission #48 – Answers: When to Learn Second Instrument
    - Submission #48 – Answers: Which Non-harp Players Influenced You
    - Submission #48 – Answers: Do You Play for the Crowd or Yourself?
    - Submission #48 – Banter: Non-harp Friendly Bands
    - Submission #48 – Closing

    BEGINNING STUDENT JOE TARTAGLIA
    Follow beginning student Joe Tartaglia as he learns blues harmonica for the first time! In these videos you'll see his actual biweekly lessons with David Barrett (in their entirety) as well as see video reports from him between lessons. These videos are highly valuable to the new blues harmonica student seeking guidance on what to learn and when. Video submissions are as follows:
    - Meet Joe and his wife Patti
    - Getting Started & Holding
    - Blessings & Curses
    - Reading Music
    - Tongue Blocking a Single Note
    - "Walk with Me" Chorus 1
    - Tremolo
    - Solo Harmonica (Chording)
    - Checking in between lesson 1 & 2
    - Review of Lesson 1
    - Review "Walk With Me" Chorus 1 & Breathing
    - Tongue Switching (Playing the 1st Hole)
    - "Walk With Me" Chorus 2
    - "Walk With Me" Chorus 3
    - Solo Harmonica Study 1 - Ex 1.1-1.7
    - Lesson End Review
    - Checking In Between Lesson 2 & 3
    - Tongue switching & 2 Draw help
    - Adding dynamics and tremolo
    - Choruses 3 & 4 of "Walk with Me"
    - Choruses 5 & 6 of "Walk with Me"
    - Choruses 6 & 7 of "Walk with Me"
    - Checking In Between Lesson 3 & 4 part 1
    - Checking In Between Lesson 3 & 4 part 2
    - Working study song at multiple tempos
    - Final comments for "Walk with Me" Part 1
    - Final comments for "Walk with Me" Part 2
    - Final comments for "Walk with Me" Part 3
    - Final comments for "Walk with Me" Part 4
    - Playing "Walk with Me" with a band - Opening
    - Playing "Walk with Me" with a band - Ending
    - Using a vocal mic or amp
    - Checking In Between Lesson 4 & 5
    - Open
    - Solo Harmonica Study 1 Review - Examples 1.1 through 1.9
    - Solo Harmonica Study 1 Review - Examples 1.10 through 1.12
    - Solo Harmonica Study 1 Review - Examples 1.13 and 1.14
    - Solo Harmonica Study 1 Review - Example 1.15
    - Tongue Block Slaps & "Temperature" Study Song
    - Checking in after Lesson 5
    - "Temperature" Chorus 1
    - "Temperature" Chorus 3 & Help with Slaps
    - Counting a song in and using a metronome
    - "Blues for Big Nate" Part 1
    - "Blues for Big Nate" Part 2
    - "Blues for Big Nate" Part 3
    - Checking in after Lesson 6
    - Is learning how to read music important?
    - "Temperature" Choruses 1 through 3
    - "Temperature" Chorus 4 and Slap Help Part 1
    - "Temperature" Chorus 4 and Slap Help Part 2
    - Review for homework and Sweet Home Chicago
    - Mics
    - Checking in after Lesson 7
    - Bending Basics
    - Notes Available on the Harmonica for Bending
    - Meat and Potatoes of Bending
    - Tongue Block vs. Pucker Bending
    - Review of Major Focus Areas
    - Joe Tries to Bend
    - Checking in after Lesson 8
    - Catching Up
    - Bending Review - Holes 3 & 4
    - Bending Review - Hole 6
    - Pulls
    - Pulls & Example 2.1 in Solo Harmonica Study 1
    - Checking in Between Lessons 9 and 10
    - Catching Up
    - Joe Plays "Temperature" with Jam Track
    - David's Comments on Choruses 1 through 3 of "Temperature"
    - David's Comments on Choruses 4 to End - Part 1
    - David's Comments on Choruses 4 to End - Part 2
    - Starting "Temperature" on the Bandstand
    - Ending "Temperature" on the Bandstand
    - Checking in Between Lessons 10 and 11
    - Catching Up
    - Pull Review
    - Solo Harmonica Study 2 - Ex. 2.1
    - Solo Harmonica Study 2 - Ex. 2.2
    - Bending Study 2 - "Feelin' for the Blues" Chorus 1 and Bending Review
    - Checking in Between Lessons 11 and 12
    - Catching Up & Study Song Context
    - Pull Review & Solo Harmonica Study 2 - Ex. 2.1
    - "Gary's Blues" Chorus 1, Part 1
    - "Gary's Blues" Chorus 1, Part 2
    - Bending Study 2 - "Feelin' for the Blues" Chorus 1 and Bending Review
    - Checking in Between Lessons 12 and 13
    - Catching Up
    - Bending Study 2 - "Feelin' for the Blues" Chorus 1 and Bending Review
    - Bending Study 2 - "Feelin' for the Blues" Chorus 2
    - Bending Study 2 - "Feelin' for the Blues" Chorus 3
    - Tongue Blocking Study 3 - "Gary's Blues" Chorus 1
    - Tongue Blocking Study 3 - "Gary's Blues" Chorus 2
    - Bending with a Tuner
    - Joe's and David's thoughts on the Rehearsal
    - How to Figure out the Key of a Song
    - Explanation of Positions (1st, 2nd and 3rd)
    - Why David Recommend Joe to buy Hohner Blues Blaster
    - Bending Review - 2 Draw Focus and Nose Leakage
    - Gary's Blues - Choruses 1 & 2
    - Checking In After Lesson 14 & Concert (Joe and Patti)
    - Thoughts on Student Concert Performance
    - Gary's Blues Review - Choruses 1 through 2, Part 1
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorusses 1 through 2, Part 2
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorusses 1 through 2, Part 3
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 3, Part 1
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 3, Part 2
    - Introduction to Improvising (Chorus Forms)
    - Checking In after Lesson 15
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 1 (Lesson 16)
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 2
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 3 and Dip Clarification
    - Gary's Blues Review - Chorus 4
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAA - Part 1
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAA - Part 2
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAA with Variation
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAA with Fills
    - Checking In after Lesson 16
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAA and AAA with Fills Review
    - Discussion on Level of Activity
    - Joe's AAA and AAA with Fills Example - Part 1
    - Joe's AAA and AAA with Fills Example - Part 2
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) AAB and AAB with Fills
    - Review and Homework
    - Checking In In after Lesson 17
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Joe's AAB and AAB with Fills Example - Part 1
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Joe's AAB and AAB with Fills Example - Part 2
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) A B/A C Example, Part 1
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) A B/A C Example, Part 2
    - Review and Homework
    - Checking in after Lesson 18
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Joe's A B/A C Example 1
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Joe's A B/A C Example 2
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Applying Chorus Forms - Part 1
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Applying Chorus Forms - Part 2
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Applying Chorus Forms - Part 3
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Homework Assignment
    - Improvising (Chorus Forms) Closing Words
    - Checking in after Lesson 19 [PDF for this Lesson at Top of Page]
    - Joe Plays his Assignment
    - Critique on Joe's Assignment
    - "Temperature" Analysis Part 1
    - "Temperature" Analysis Part 2
    - "Temperature" Analysis Part 3
    - Writing Assignment & Closing for Lesson 20
    - Joe Plays his Entire Original Instrumental [Version 1]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 1
    - David's Critique - Chorus 2
    - David's Critique - Chorus 3
    - David's Critique - Chorus 4, Part 1
    - David's Critique - Chorus 4, Part 2
    - Final Thoughts on Version 1
    - Checking in after Lesson 21 [PDF for this Lesson at Top of Page]
    - Lesson 22 - Welcome Back & Getting Started
    - Joe Plays his entire Original Instrumental [Version 2]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 1 [V2]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 2 [V2]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 3 [V2]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 4 [V2]
    - David's Critique - Chorus 5 [V2]
    - Final Thoughts on Version 2
    - Checking in after Lesson 22
    - Lesson 23 - Welcome Back & Getting Started
    - Introduction to V-IV-I & Turnaround Licks
    - V-IV-I Transition Licks - Part 1
    - V-IV-I Transition Licks - Part 2
    - Turnaround Licks
    - Ending Licks
    - Final Thoughts for Lesson 23
    - Checking in after Lesson 23
    - Lesson 24 - Welcome Back & Getting Started
    - Joe Plays Current Version of "Cadillac Repo Blues"
    - David's Comments on Choruses 1-3
    - David's Comments on Choruses 4-7
    - Ending Lick Ideas
    - Another Student's Songwriting Example & Closing Words
    - Checking in after Lesson 24
    - Lesson 25 - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Equipment Setup
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Computer Setup
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Volume Setup
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Take 1
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Take 2
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Editing Part 1
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Editing Part 2
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Editing Part 3
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Editing Part 4
    - Recording "Cadillac Repo Blues," Closing
    - Checking in after Lesson 25
    - Lesson 26 - Focus for the Lesson & New Recordings on the Market
    - How to Practice a Lick - Part 1
    - How to Practice a Lick - Part 2
    - How to Practice a Lick - Part 3
    - Dave plays "Take it Easy Now" Repertoire Builder Song (Bending & TB Study Song 2.5)
    - "Take it Easy Now" Chorus 1 - Part 1
    - "Take it Easy Now" Chorus 1 - Part 2
    - Closing Thoughts for Lesson 26
    - Checking in after Lesson 26
    - Lesson 27 - Introduction and Lesson 26 Review
    - How to Apply a Lick - Part 1: AAA and AAA with Fills
    - How to Apply a Lick - Part 2: Hints for Dealing with the I7 and IV7
    - How to Apply a Lick - Part 3: AAB and AAB with Fills
    - How to Apply a Lick - Part 4: A BA C and IV7 Chord Ideas
    - How to Apply a Lick - Part 5: Review
    - Joe Tartaglia says Goodbye

    BEGINNING STUDENT HOB BOSOLD
    Study along with beginning student Hob Bosold as he takes private lessons with head instructor David Barrett following the Levels of Achievement Program at BluesHarmonica.com. Each lesson is video recorded in its entirety, giving you valuable insight into the same material you're studying on the site. Joe Tartaglia was the featured beginning student on the website since its release in 2009. Hob's lessons are more up to date with the material on the site (especially in regards to the Levels of Achievement Program) and will therefore replace Joe's lessons in time. Enjoy!:
    - Intro - Getting to Know Hob, Part 1
    - Intro - Getting to Know Hob, Part 2
    - Intro - Getting to Know Hob, Part 3
    - Intro - Getting to Know Hob, Part 4
    - Lesson 1 – Intro
    - Lesson 1 – Holding the Harmonica, Part 1
    - Lesson 1 – Holding the Harmonica, Part 2
    - Lesson 1 – The Importance of Playing Softly
    - Lesson 1 – Putting the Harmonica in Your Mouth
    - Lesson 1 – Closing the Nose
    - Lesson 1 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.2
    - Lesson 1 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.4
    - Lesson 1 – Tremolo
    - Lesson 1 – Tongue Block Study 1: Tongue Block Single Note
    - Lesson 1 – Tongue Block Study 1: Example 1.2
    - Lesson 1 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 1
    - Lesson 1 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 1
    - Lesson 1 – Lesson Review
    - Lesson 1 – Bonus Footage: What Is Tone?
    - Lesson 2 – Intro & Solo Harmonica Study 1: Examples 1.2 and 1.4 Review
    - Lesson 2 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.7, Part 1
    - Lesson 2 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.7, Part 2 (Rhythm Training)
    - Lesson 2 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.7, Part 3
    - Lesson 2 – Tongue Block Study 1: Single Note, Slap and Flutter Review
    - Lesson 2 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 1 Review
    - Lesson 2 – Tongue Block Study 1: Playing Hole 1
    - Lesson 2 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 1 Review
    - Lesson 2 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 3 & Articulation
    - Lesson 2 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 1 Review & Section 2, Part 1
    - Lesson 2 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 2, Part 2
    - Lesson 2 – Closing
    - Lesson 3 – Intro
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Choruses 1-3 Review, Part 1
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Choruses 1-3 Review, Part 2
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 4, Part 1
    - Lesson 3 – Major Scale
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 4, Part 2
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 5, Part 1
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 5, Part 2
    - Lesson 3 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Chorus 6
    - Lesson 3 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Example 1.7 Review
    - Lesson 3 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 2, Bending Review
    - Lesson 3 – Closing
    - Lesson 4 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Page 1 Review
    - Lesson 4 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Page 2 Review
    - Lesson 4 – Solo Harmonica Study 1: Examples 1.2 to 1.7 Review
    - Lesson 4 – Major Scale and Finding where you are on the Harmonica
    - Lesson 4 – Solo Harmonica Study 2: Example 1.6
    - Lesson 4 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 2 Review, Part 1 (Bending Focus)
    - Lesson 4 – Music Theory Study 1: Section 2 Review, Part 2 (Bending Focus)
    - Lesson 4 – Closing
    - Lesson 5 – Intro
    - Lesson 5 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, Hob Plays
    - Lesson 5 – Tongue Block Study 1: Walk With Me, David Critiques
    - Lesson 5 – Tongue Block Study 2.5: Slap Exercises
    - Lesson 5 – Solo Harmonica Study 2: Example 1.6
    - Lesson 5 – Solo Harmonica Study 2: Playing with a Metronome
    - Lesson 5 – Music Theory: 12 Bar Blues, Part 1
    - Lesson 5 – Music Theory: 12 Bar Blues, Part 2
    - Lesson 5 – Music Theory: 12 Bar Blues, Part 3

    INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED STUDENT RYAN WALKER
    Follow Intermediate (and now Advanced) student Ryan Walker as he studies blues harmonica seriously for the first time. In these videos you'll see his actual biweekly lessons with me (in their entirety). These videos are highly valuable to the Intermediate and advanced blues harmonica student seeking guidance on what to learn and when. Video submissions are as follows:
    - Lesson 1 - Getting to Know Ryan, Part 1
    - Lesson 1 - Getting to Know Ryan, Part 2
    - Lesson 1 - Tremolo Review
    - Lesson 1 - Solo Harmonica Study 1, Example 1.2
    - Lesson 1 - Solo Harmonica Study 1, Examples 1.4 through 1.7
    - Lesson 1 - Solo Harmonica Study 1, Examples 1.8 through 1.12
    - Lesson 1 - Take It Easy Now Study Song (TB and Bending Study 2.5) Introduction
    - Lesson 1 - Take It Easy Now, Chorus 1
    - Lesson 1 - Take It Easy Now, Chorus 2
    - Lesson 1 - Take It Easy Now, Chorus 3 to End
    - Lesson 1 - Closing
    - Lesson 2 - Intro
    - Lesson 2 - Ryan plays Take it Easy Now and David's Comments
    - Lesson 2 - Cupping and Wa Wa
    - Lesson 2 - How to play Take It Easy Now with a Band, Part 1
    - Lesson 2 - How to play Take It Easy Now with a Band, Part 2
    - Lesson 2 - How to play Take It Easy Now with a Band, Part 3
    - Lesson 2 - Solo Harmonica Study 1, Examples 1.13 through 1.15
    - Lesson 2 - Solo Harmonica Study 1, Examples 2.1 to End
    - Lesson 2 - Gary's Blues, Choruses 1 through 3
    - Lesson 2 - Gary's Blues, Choruses 4 to End
    - Lesson 2 - Closing
    - Lesson 3 - Intro
    - Lesson 3 - Cupping Review
    - Lesson 3 - Bullet Mic Sizes and Cupping
    - Lesson 3 - Cupping and Control of Tone
    - Lesson 3 - Ryan Tries Cupping
    - Lesson 3 - Cupping with Light
    - Lesson 3 - Cupping with a Cup
    - Lesson 3 - Ryan plays Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 3 - David Critiques Ryan’s Performance of Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 3 - How to Play Gary’s Blues with a Band
    - Lesson 4 - Gary's Blues, How to End with Band
    - Lesson 4 - Bending Study Song #3, The Strut: Bending
    - Lesson 4 - The Strut, Chorus 1
    - Lesson 4 - The Strut, Choruses 2 to 5
    - Lesson 4 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Examples 1.1 to 1.4
    - Lesson 4 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Example 1.5
    - Lesson 4 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Example 1.6 & Closing
    - Lesson 5 - The Strut, Ryan plays Choruses 1 through 5
    - Lesson 5 - The Strut, Comments on Choruses 1 through 3
    - Lesson 5 - The Strut, Comments on Choruses 4 through 5
    - Lesson 5 - The Strut, Chorus 6
    - Lesson 5 - The Strut, Chorus 7
    - Lesson 5 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Ryan Plays Examples 1.5 to 1.6
    - Lesson 5 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Examples 1.7 to 1.8
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key of a Song, Method 1: 2 Draw
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key of a Song, Method 2: Positions
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key of a Song, Method 3: C Scale
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key of a Song, Method 4: Chromatic Scale
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key and Position of a Harmonica in a Song, Part 1
    - Lesson 5 - Figuring out the Key and Position of a Harmonica in a Song, Part 2
    - Lesson 6 - Intro
    - Lesson 6 - The Strut, Ryan Plays Entire Song
    - Lesson 6 - The Strut, Comments
    - Lesson 6 - How to Play The Strut with a Band
    - Lesson 6 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Example 1.7
    - Lesson 6 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Examples 1.8 and 1.9
    - Lesson 6 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Examples 2.1 through 2.4
    - Lesson 6 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Example 2.5 and Homework Assignment
    - Lesson 7 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Homework Assignment: Version 1
    - Lesson 7 - Solo Harmonica Study 2, Homework Assignment: Version 2
    - Lesson 7 - Discussions on Chromatic Harmonica Models
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: Principles, Part 1
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: Principles, Part 2
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: Ryan Improvises an Instrumental
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: Comments on Ryan's Improvisation
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: AAA Chorus Form, Part 1
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: AAA Chorus Form, Part 2
    - Lesson 7 - Improvising: AAA Chorus Form with Fills
    - Lesson 8 - Intro & Ryan plays Ending to Strut
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: AAA Chorus Form with Fills Review, Part 1
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: AAA Chorus Form with Fills Review, Part 2
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: AAB Chorus Form
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: AAB Chorus Form with Fills
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: A B/A C Chorus Form, B = Contrast
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: A B/A C Chorus Form, B = Little Change
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: A B/A C Chorus Form, B = Sequence, Part 1
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: A B/A C Chorus Form, B = Sequence, Part 2
    - Lesson 8 - Improvising: A B/A C Chorus Form, B = Sequence, Part 3
    - Lesson 8 - Theory, Study 1: Section 1
    - Lesson 8 - Introduction to the Chromatic Harmonica & Closing
    - Lesson 9 - Prep for Student Concert and Memorizing the Harmonica
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Chorus Form Review, Part 1
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Chorus Form Review, Part 2 (Sequences)
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Transformations, Part 1
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Transformations, Part 2
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Transformations, Part 3
    - Lesson 9 - Improvising: Original Instrumental Assignment
    - Lesson 9 - Theory, Study 1: Section 2
    - Lesson 9 - Chromatic Harmonica: Holes 1 and 2
    - Lesson 9 - Chromatic Harmonica: Holes 1 and 3
    - Lesson 9 - Chromatic Harmonica: Memorization
    - Lesson 9 - Closing
    - Lesson 10 - Introduction
    - Lesson 10 - Opening & Ending Practice: The Strut, Part 1
    - Lesson 10 - Opening & Ending Practice: The Strut, Part 2
    - Lesson 10 - Opening & Ending Practice: Take It Easy Now
    - Lesson 10 - Opening & Ending Practice: Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 10 - Dealing with Challenges on the Bandstand, Part 1
    - Lesson 10 - Dealing with Challenges on the Bandstand, Part 2
    - Lesson 10 - Ryan Plays: The Strut
    - Lesson 10 - Ryan Plays: Take It Easy Now
    - Lesson 10 - Ryan Plays: Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 10 - Chromatic Harmonica: Holes 4 and 5, Part 1
    - Lesson 10 - Chromatic Harmonica: Holes 4 and 5, Part 2
    - Lesson 10 - Student Concert Rehearsal!
    - Lesson 11 - Intro & How Rehearsal Went
    - Lesson 11 - Theory, Study 1: Section 2 Review
    - Lesson 11 - Theory, Study 1: Section 3 (Major Scales)
    - Lesson 11 - Chromatic Harmonica: Holes 1 thru 5 Review
    - Lesson 11 - Chromatic Harmonica: Textures, Part 1
    - Lesson 11 - Chromatic Harmonica: Textures, Part 2
    - Lesson 11 - Chromatic Harmonica: Slide Usage
    - Lesson 11 - Improvising: Lick 1 of Instrumental
    - Lesson 11 - Improvising: Lick 2 of Instrumental & Closing
    - Lesson 11.5 - Student Concert: Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 11.5 - Student Concert: Take It Easy Now
    - Lesson 11.5 - Student Concert: The Strut
    - Lesson 12 - Concert Debrief, Part 1: Gary’s Blues
    - Lesson 12 - Concert Debrief, Part 2: The Strut
    - Lesson 12 - Concert Debrief, Part 3: Take It Easy - What Went Wrong?
    - Lesson 12 - Concert Debrief, Part 4: Take It Easy - How to Fix It
    - Lesson 12 - Chromatic: Texture Review
    - Lesson 12 - Chromatic: Slide Review
    - Lesson 12 - Chromatic: Ryan Play’s No Sweat, Part 1
    - Lesson 12 - Chromatic: Ryan Play’s No Sweat, Part 2
    - Lesson 12 - Improvising: Chorus 1 of Instrumental
    - Lesson 12 - Improvising: Chorus 2 of Instrumental
    - Lesson 12 - Improvising: Chorus 3 of Instrumental
    - Lesson 12 - Improvising: Closing
    - Lesson 13 - Intro, Trip to Germany & 2014 20th Anniversary Workshop
    - Lesson 13 - Chromatic: No Sweat Ending
    - Lesson 13 - Chromatic: Cool Blue, CH1
    - Lesson 13 - Chromatic: Cool Blue, CH2-3
    - Lesson 13 - Chromatic: Cool Blue, CH4 to End
    - Lesson 13 - Improvising: Instrumental Charting
    - Lesson 13 - Improvising: Instrumental Played in Order
    - Lesson 13 - Improvising: Critique of Choruses, Part 1
    - Lesson 13 - Improvising: Critique of Choruses, Part 2
    - Lesson 13 - Theory, Study 1: Section 3 Review, Part 1
    - Lesson 13 - Theory, Study 1: Section 3 Review, Part 1 & Section 4, Ex. 1-3
    - Lesson 14 - Intro
    - Lesson 14 - Chromatic: Ryan plays Cool Blue
    - Lesson 14 - Chromatic: Cool Blue Critique & Cupping Bullet Mic
    - Lesson 14 - Chromatic: Easy Baby, CH1-2
    - Lesson 14 - Chromatic: Easy Baby, CH3
    - Lesson 14 - Theory, Study 1: Section 4.1-3
    - Lesson 14 - Theory, Study 1: Section 4.4
    - Lesson 14 - Improvising: Ordering of Choruses in Instrumental, Part 1
    - Lesson 14 - Improvising: Ordering of Choruses in Instrumental, Part 2
    - Lesson 14 - Improvising: Using Breaks as Theme for Song
    - Lesson 14 - Closing
    - Lesson 15 - Intro
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Is stealing licks okay?
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Easy Baby CH1 Critique & Cupping
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Easy Baby CH2 Critique & Tone
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Easy Baby CH3 Critique & Fake Octaves
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Easy Baby, CH4-5
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: Easy Baby, CH6
    - Lesson 15 - Chromatic: D Blues Scale
    - Lesson 15 - Improvising: Breaks Review, Part 1
    - Lesson 15 - Improvising: Breaks Review, Part 2
    - Lesson 15 - Improvising: Instrumental, First Play Through
    - Lesson 15 - Improvising: Instrumental, Second Play Through & Closing
    - Lesson 16 - Intro
    - Lesson 16 - Theory, Study 1: Review
    - Lesson 16 - Theory, Study 1: Section 4.8-11
    - Lesson 16 - Theory, Study 1: Section 4.12-13
    - Lesson 16 - Theory, Study 2: Section 1 & Mental Model, Part 1
    - Lesson 16 - Theory, Study 2: Section 1 & Mental Model, Part 2
    - Lesson 16 - Chromatic: Ryan plays Easy Baby & Critique
    - Lesson 16 - Rehearsal: Cool Blue
    - Lesson 16 - Rehearsal: Walker’s Shuffle
    - Lesson 16 - Improvising: Walker’s Shuffle Notation, CH1-4
    - Lesson 16 - Improvising: Walker’s Shuffle Notation, CH5-End
    - Lesson 16 - Ryan Gifted Gear!
    - Lesson 16.5 - Student Concert: Cool Blue
    - Lesson 16.5 - Student Concert: Walker's Shuffle
    - Lesson 17 - Equipment: Lone Wolf Delay
    - Lesson 17 - Equipment: Lone Wolf Harp Attack
    - Lesson 17 - Equipment: Harp Amp
    - Lesson 17 - Equipment: Kay Amp
    - Lesson 17 - Equipment: Final Thoughts
    - Lesson 18 - Intro
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Cool Blue, Part 1 (Hearing Yourself)
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Cool Blue, Part 2 (Thumb on Chro)
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Walker’s Shuffle, Part 1 (Opening)
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Walker’s Shuffle, Part 2 (Solo)
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Walker’s Shuffle, Part 3 (Accompaniment)
    - Lesson 18 - Student Concert Review: Walker’s Shuffle, Part 4 (Ending)
    - Lesson 18 - Improvising: Instrumental V1, Intro
    - Lesson 18 - Improvising: Instrumental V1, Ryan Plays
    - Lesson 18 - Improvising: Instrumental V1, Closing Comments
    - Lesson 18 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.1, Part 1
    - Lesson 18 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.1, Part 2
    - Lesson 18 – Theory, Study 2: Mental Model - Ryan’s
    - Lesson 18 – Theory, Study 2: Mental Model - Memory Palace
    - Lesson 18 – Theory, Study 2: Mental Model - Student Examples, Part 1
    - Lesson 18 – Theory, Study 2: Mental Model - Student Examples, Part 2 & Closing
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Review of the Chorus Form Process
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Analyzing Temperature & Focus Notes, Part 1
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Analyzing Temperature & Focus Notes, Part 2
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Defining Focus Notes
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Focus Notes 1 and 2”
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Focus Notes 2 and 3
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Focus Note 4
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Focus Note 5
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Pacing Yourself
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Playing Focus Notes Together
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Progressive Focus Notes Together
    - Lesson 19 - Improvising Study 2: Random Focus Notes Together
    - Lesson 19 - Accompaniment Study 1
    - Lesson 19 – Theory Study 1: Final
    - Lesson 19 – Theory Study 2: Section 1
    - Lesson 20 - Intro
    - Lesson 20 - Improvising Study 3: Intro
    - Lesson 20 - Improvising Study 3: Changing Dynamics each Chorus
    - Lesson 20 - Improvising Study 3: Changing Dynamics each Chord Change
    - Lesson 20 - Improvising Study 3: Dynamic Gradients
    - Lesson 20 - Improvising Study 3: Changing Dynamics within each Lick
    - Lesson 20 - Theory Study 2: Section 1 Review (1st Position)
    - Lesson 20 - Theory Study 2: Section 2 Review (2nd Position)
    - Lesson 20 - Theory Study 2: Section 3 (3rd Position)
    - Lesson 20 - Theory Study 2: Section 4 (4th Position)
    - Lesson 20 - Theory Study 2: Why other Positions are Not Commonly Used in Traditional Blues
    - Lesson 20 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.2
    - Lesson 20 - Mental Model and Modes of the C Major Scale
    - Lesson 20 - Accompaniment Study 1: Ryan’s Findings
    - Lesson 20 - Accompaniment Study 2
    - Lesson 21 - Intro & Chromatic: Ryan Plays Easy Baby
    - Lesson 21 - Theory Study 1: Sections 2 through 4 Review
    - Lesson 21 - Movement Exercises: Modes
    - Lesson 21 - Improvising Study 4: V-IV-I Transitions Defined
    - Lesson 21 - Improvising Study 4: V-IV-I Chord Tones
    - Lesson 21 - Accompaniment Study 3: Chords & Hole Changes
    - Lesson 22 - Intro & Dealing with Stuck Reeds
    - Lesson 22 - Improvising Study 4: Memorizing Chord Tones
    - Lesson 22 - Improvising Study 4: V-IV-I Chord Review
    - Lesson 22 - Improvising Study 4: Section 3 Licks, Part 1
    - Lesson 22 - Improvising Study 4: Section 3 Licks, Part 2
    - Lesson 22 - Accompaniment Study 3: Hole 1 Review
    - Lesson 22 - Accompaniment Study 3: Hole 2 Review
    - Lesson 22 - Accompaniment Study 3: Hole 3
    - Lesson 22 - Accompaniment Study 3: Holes 4 through 6
    - Lesson 22 - Ryan's Issues with Stage Feedback
    - Lesson 22 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.3
    - Lesson 22 - Theory Study 3: Intervals
    - Lesson 22 - Accompaniment Study 3: Harmonica Harmonies & Closing
    - Lesson 23 - Intro & Accompaniment Study 3: Harmonica and Chord Review
    - Lesson 23 - Accompaniment Study 3: Hole Changes Review
    - Lesson 23 - Accompaniment Study 3: Blues Creapin’ Over Me
    - Lesson 23 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.4
    - Lesson 23 - Accompaniment Study 3: Ex. 1-8
    - Lesson 24 - Theory Study 3: Chord Qualities, Part 1
    - Lesson 24 - Theory Study 3: Chord Qualities, Part 2
    - Lesson 24 - Theory Study 3: Chord Qualities, Part 3
    - Lesson 24 - Theory Study 3: Chord Qualities, Part 4
    - Lesson 24 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 1.5
    - Lesson 24 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 9-13
    - Lesson 24 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 14-17
    - Lesson 24 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 18-25
    - Lesson 24 - Accompaniment Study 3: The Blues Break
    - Lesson 24 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Chorus 1
    - Lesson 24 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Chorus 2
    - Lesson 24 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Chorus 3 to End
    - Lesson 24 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Ending & Rice Miller Lick
    - Lesson 25 - Intro & Chord Note Cards
    - Lesson 25 - Accompaniment Study 4: Intro
    - Lesson 25 - Accompaniment Study 4: Beginning to Ex. 2.3
    - Lesson 25 - Accompaniment Study 4: Ex. 2.4 to End
    - Lesson 25 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.1
    - Lesson 25 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 26-34
    - Lesson 25 - Theory Study 3: Ex. 2.4
    - Lesson 25 - Theory Study 3: 7th Chords
    - Lesson 25 - Closing
    - Lesson 26 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 35-43, Part 1
    - Lesson 26 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 35-43, Part 2
    - Lesson 26 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.2
    - Lesson 26 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Choruses 1-3
    - Lesson 26 - Tongue Block Study 4: The Split, Choruses 3 to end
    - Lesson 26 - Accompaniment Study 5: 7th Chords
    - Lesson 26 - Theory Study 3: 7th Chords and Playing in Minor, Part 1
    - Lesson 26 - Theory Study 3: 7th Chords and Playing in Minor, Part 2
    - Lesson 27 - Intro
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Section 1, Octaves, 3rds and 7ths (Part 1)
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Section 1, Octaves, 3rds and 7ths (Part 2)
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Section 2, Organ Padding
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Section 3, Horn Lines
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Used To Be My Baby (Part 1)
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Used To Be My Baby (Part 2)
    - Lesson 27 - Accompaniment Study 6: Used To Be My Baby (Part 3)
    - Lesson 27 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.3
    - Lesson 27 - Theory Study 3: Improvising in Minor
    - Lesson 28 - Intro
    - Lesson 28 - Theory Study 3: Ryan Improvises in Minor, Take 1
    - Lesson 28 - Theory Study 3: David Critiques Ryan’s Soloing
    - Lesson 28 - Theory Study 3: Ryan Improvises in Minor, Take 2
    - Lesson 28 - Theory Study 3: David Improvises in Minor
    - Lesson 28 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 44-51
    - Lesson 28 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 52-59
    - Lesson 28 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.4 and 2.5
    - Lesson 28 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Opening
    - Lesson 28 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Head
    - Lesson 29 - Intro
    - Lesson 29 - Accompaniment Study 6: Ryan Plays Used To Be My Baby
    - Lesson 29 - Accompaniment Study 6: Used To Be My Baby Critique
    - Lesson 29 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.6
    - Lesson 29 - Solo Harmonica Study 3: Ex. 2.7
    - Lesson 29 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 60-68
    - Lesson 29 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Opening to Chorus 2
    - Lesson 29 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Chorus 3
    - Lesson 29 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Vibrato Discussion
    - Lesson 29 - Bending Study 4: My Blues, Chorus 4
    - Lesson 30 - Intro
    - Lesson 30 - Bending Study 4: Ryan plays My Blues
    - Lesson 30 - Bending Study 4: David Critiques Ryan’s Performance
    - Lesson 30 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 69-73
    - Lesson 30 - Improvising Study 4: Section 4, Ex. 74-82
    - Lesson 30 - Improvising Study 4: Section 5, Ex. 2
    - Lesson 30 - Accompaniment Study 7: Ex. 1 to 2.4
    - Lesson 30 - Accompaniment Study 7: Ex. 2.5 to 3.3
    - Lesson 30 - Accompaniment Study 7: Ex. 4.1 to 4.3
    - Lesson 30 - Solo Harmonica Study
    - Lesson 31 - Intro
    - Lesson 31 - Solo Harmonica Study Ideas
    - Lesson 31 - Accompaniment Study 7: Review
    - Lesson 31 - Accompaniment Study 7: Ex. 4.4 to 5.1
    - Lesson 31 - Accompaniment Study 7: Ex. 5.2 to 5.8
    - Lesson 31 - Tongue Block Study 5: 5-Hole Octave Exercises, Part 1
    - Lesson 31 - Tongue Block Study 5: 5-Hole Octave Exercises, Part 2
    - Lesson 32 - Intro
    - Lesson 32 - Accompaniment Study 7: Tramp Bass Line, Part 1
    - Lesson 32 - Accompaniment Study 7: Tramp Bass Line, Part 2
    - Lesson 32 - Accompaniment Study 7: Transitions
    - Lesson 32 - Accompaniment Study 7: Walking Bass Lines
    - Lesson 32 - Solo Harmonica Study Final Ideas
    - Lesson 32 - Tongue Block Study 5: Blues for Paul deLay, CH1-2
    - Lesson 32 - Tongue Block Study 5: Blues for Paul deLay, CH1-2
    - Lesson 32 - Tongue Block Study 5: Blues for Paul deLay, CH4 to End
    - Lesson 32 - Music Theory Study 3, Section 6
    - Lesson 32 - Music Theory Study 3, Section 6 and 7
    - Lesson 33 - Intro and Solo Harmonica Study Song Continued
    - Lesson 33 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 1, Example 1.1
    - Lesson 33 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 1, Examples 1.2 to 1.7
    - Lesson 33 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 1, Examples 1.8 to 1.10
    - Lesson 33 - Music Theory 4: Examples 1.1 to 1.11
    - Lesson 33 - Music Theory 4: Examples 1.12 to 1.14
    - Lesson 34 - Intro
    - Lesson 34 - Solo Harmonica Study Song
    - Lesson 34 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 1
    - Lesson 34 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 2, Part 2
    - Lesson 34 - Accompaniment Study 8: Section 3
    - Lesson 34 - Ryan’s Effects
    - Lesson 35 - Intro & Tongue Block Study 5: Blues for Paul deLay
    - Lesson 35 - Bending Study 5: Half Steppin’, Chorus 1
    - Lesson 35 - Bending Study 5: Half Steppin’, Chorus 2
    - Lesson 35 - Bending Study 5: Half Steppin’, Chorus 3
    - Lesson 35 - Accompaniment Study 9: Song 1, Part 1
    - Lesson 35 - Accompaniment Study 9: Song 1, Part 2

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