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Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith FRSL (born on 25 October 1975) [ 1 ] is an English novelist, essayist, and short story writer.

Smith was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2002. As of 2012, she has published four novels, all of which have received substantial critical praise. In 2003, she was included on Granta 's list of 20 best young authors, [ 2 ] and was also included in the 2013 list. [ 3 ] She joined New York University 's Creative Writing Program as a tenured professor on 1 September 2010. [ 4 ] Smith has won the Orange Prize for Fiction [ 5 ] and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in 2006 [ 6 ] and her novel White Teeth was included in Time magazine's TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005 list.

Early life

Zadie Smith was born as Sadie Smith in the north-west London borough of Brent to a Jamaican mother, Yvonne Bailey, and an English father, Harvey Smith. [ 7 ] Her mother had grown up in Jamaica and migrated to England in 1969. [ 1 ] Their marriage was her father's second. Zadie has a half-sister, a half-brother, and two younger brothers, one of whom is the rapper and stand-up comedian Doc Brown and the other is rapper Luc Skyz. As a child she was fond of tap dancing; [ 1 ] as a teenager she considered a career as an actress in musical theatre; and as a university student she earned money as a jazz singer and wanted to become a journalist.

Her parents divorced when she was a teenager. When she was 14, she changed her name to "Zadie". [ 8 ] Despite earlier ambitions, literature emerged as her principal interest.

Education

Smith attended the local state schools, Malorees Junior School and Hampstead Comprehensive School. and King's College, Cambridge. where she studied English literature. In an interview with The Guardian in 2000, Smith corrected a newspaper assertion that she left Cambridge with a double First. "Actually, I got a Third in my Part Ones," she said. [ 9 ]

Smith seems to have been rejected for a place in the Cambridge Footlights by the popular British comedy double act Mitchell and Webb. while all three were studying at Cambridge University in the 1990s. [ 10 ]

At Cambridge she published a number of short stories in a collection of new student writing called The Mays Anthology. These attracted the attention of a publisher, who offered her a contract for her first novel. Smith decided to contact a literary agent and was taken on by A. P. Watt. [ 11 ] Smith returned to guest-edit the anthology in 2001. [ 12 ]

Career

White Teeth was introduced to the publishing world in 1997, before it was completed. On the basis of a partial manuscript an auction among different publishers for the rights started, with Hamish Hamilton being successful. Smith completed White Teeth during her final year at Cambridge. Published in 2000, the novel became a best-seller immediately. It was praised internationally and won a number of awards. The novel was adapted for television in 2002 by Channel 4. [ 1 ] Smith also served as writer-in-residence at the ICA in London and subsequently published, as editor, an anthology of sex writing, Piece of Flesh (ICA, 1999), as the culmination of this role.

In interviews she reported that the hype surrounding her first novel had caused her to suffer a short spell of writer's block. Nevertheless, her second novel, The Autograph Man. was published in 2002 and was a commercial success, although the critical response was not as positive as it had been to White Teeth .

After the publication of The Autograph Man . Smith visited the United States as a 2002–03 Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellow at Harvard University. [ 13 ] She started work on a still unreleased book of essays, The Morality of the Novel. aka Fail Better. in which she considers a selection of 20th-century writers through the lens of moral philosophy. Some portions of this book presumably are included in the essay collection Changing My Mind. published in November 2009.

The second novel was followed by another, On Beauty (published in September 2005), which is set largely in and around Greater Boston and which attracted more acclaim. This third novel was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. [ 14 ] and won the 2006 Orange Prize for Fiction and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards. [ 6 ]

Later in the same year, Smith published Martha and Hanwell. a book combining two short stories about two troubled characters. Originally published in Granta and The New Yorker . Penguin Books published Martha and Hanwell with a new introduction by Smith as part of their pocket series to celebrate their 70th birthday. [ 15 ] The first story, "Martha, Martha", deals with Smith's familiar themes of race and postcolonial identity, while "Hanwell in Hell" is about a man struggling to cope with the death of his wife. [ 16 ]

After teaching fiction at Columbia University School of the Arts. she joined New York University as a tenured professor of fiction as of 1 September 2010.

Beginning with the March 2011 issue, extending until October 2011, Smith was the monthly New Books reviewer for Harper's Magazine . [ 18 ] [ 19 ]

Smith's latest novel, NW . was published in 2012. It is set in the Kilburn area of north-west London, the title being a reference to the local postcode, NW6.

In 2010, The Guardian newspaper asked Smith for her "10 rules for writing fiction". Among them she declared: "Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied." [ 20 ]

In 2015 it was announced that Smith, along with her husband Nick Laird was writing the screenplay for a scifi movie to be directed by French filmmaker Claire Denis. [ 21 ]

Personal life

Other articles

Smith Zadie

Smith Zadie. Changing my mind: occasional essays

White Teeth in her early twenties, but what kind she'll be (or will be next) seems open to change. Which all, along with her consistent intelligence, grace, and wit, makes her an ideal essayist too, especially for the sort of "occasional essays" collected for the first time in Changing My Mind. She can make the case equally for the cozy "middle way" of E.M. Forster and the most purposefully demanding of David Foster Wallace's stories, both as a reader and, you imagine, as a writer who is considering their methods for her own. The occasions in this book didn't only bring her to write about writers, though: she also investigates, among other subjects, Katherine Hepburn, Liberia, and Barack Obama (through the lens of Pygmalion), and, in the collection's finest piece, recalls her late father and their shared comedy snobbery. One wishes more occasions upon her.

A sparkling collection of Zadie Smith's nonfiction over the past decade.

Zadie Smith brings to her essays all of the curiosity, intellectual rigor, and sharp humor that have attracted so many readers to her fiction, and the result is a collection that is nothing short of extraordinary.

Split into four sections - "Reading," "Being," "Seeing," and "Feeling"- Changing My Mind invites readers to witness the world from Zadie Smith's unique vantage. Smith casts her acute eye over material both personal and cultural, with wonderfully engaging essays -s ome published here for the first time-on diverse topics including literature, movies, going to the Oscars, British comedy, family, feminism, Obama, Katharine Hepburn, and Anna Magnani.

In her investigations Smith also reveals much of herself. Her literary criticism shares the wealth of her experiences as a reader and exposes the tremendous influence diverse writers - E. M. Forster, Zora Neale Hurston, George Eliot, and others - have had on her writing life and her self-understanding. Smith also speaks directly to writers as a craftsman, offering precious practical lessons on process. Here and throughout, readers will learn of the wide-ranging experiences-in novels, travel, philosophy, politics, and beyond-that have nourished Smith's rich life of the mind. Her probing analysis offers tremendous food for thought, encouraging readers to attend to the slippery questions of identity, art, love, and vocation that so often go neglected.

Changing My Mind announces Zadie Smith as one of our most important contemporary essayists, a writer with the rare ability to turn the world on its side with both fact and fiction. Changing My Mind is a gift to readers, writers, and all who want to look at life more expansively.

Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith


imagesize = 150px
name = Zadie Smith
caption = Photo: BrooklynHeathen.com
pseudonym =
birthdate = October 25, 1975
birthplace = Brent. London. England
deathdate =
deathplace =
occupation = Novelist. essayist
nationality = English
period = 2000-present
genre =
subject =
movement = realism. postmodernism
influences = Vladimir Nabokov. E.M. Forster. Charles Dickens. P.G. Wodehouse. Martin Amis. Franz Kafka. Raymond Carver. Philip Roth. Salman Rushdie. Hanif Kureishi. David Foster Wallace. Zora Neale Hurston
influenced =

Zadie Smith (born 25 October 1975) [http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1560999,00.html "Learning Curve," "The Guardian", 3 September 2005 ] is an English novelist. To date she has written three novels. In 2003, she was included on "Granta's " list of 20 best young authors.

Zadie Smith was born Sadie Smith in the northwest London borough of Brent – a largely working-class area – to a Jamaica n mother, Yvonne McLean, and an English father, Harvey Smith. Her mother had grown up in Jamaica and immigrated to England in 1969. It was her father's second marriage. She has a half-sister, a half-brother, and two younger brothers, one of whom is the rapper Doc Brown. Her parents divorced when she was a teenager.

As a child she was fond of tap dancing ; as a teenager she considered a career as an actress in musical theatre ; and as a university student she earned money as a jazz singer and wanted to become a journalist. Literature, however, came to be her principal interest. When she was 14, she changed her name to "Zadie."

Education and career

Smith attended the local state schools, Malorees Junior School and Hampstead Comprehensive School. and King's College. Cambridge University where she studied English literature. [ [http://www.granta.com/Contributors/Zadie-Smith Zadie Smith, Granta ] ] In an interview with the Guardian in 2000, Smith was keen to correct a recent newspaper assertion that she left Cambridge with a double First. "Actually, I got a Third in my Part Ones", she said. At Cambridge she published a number of short stories in a collection of student writing (see Short stories) called the " May Anthologies ". These attracted the attention of a publisher who offered her a contract for her first novel. Smith decided to contact a literary agent and was taken on by the Wylie Agency on the basis of little more than a first chapter.

" White Teeth " was introduced to the publishing world in 1997, long before it was completed. On the basis of a partial script an auction among different publishers for the rights started, with Hamish Hamilton being successful. Smith completed "White Teeth" during her final year at Cambridge. Published in 2000, the novel became a bestseller immediately. It was praised internationally and won a number of awards (see Novels).

In interviews she reported that the hype surrounding her first novel had caused her to suffer a short spell of writer's block. Nevertheless, her second novel, "The Autograph Man", was published in 2002 and was a commercial success, although the critical response was not as unanimously positive as it had been to "White Teeth".

After the publication of " The Autograph Man ", Smith visited the United States as a 2002–2003 Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellow at Harvard University. [ [http://www.radcliffe.edu/fellowships/fellows_1004.aspx 2002-2003 Radcliffe Institute Fellows ] ] She started work on a book of essays, "The Morality of the Novel", in which she considers a selection of 20th century writers through the lens of moral philosophy .

Her third novel, " On Beauty ", was published in September 2005 and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. The book won the 2006 Orange Prize for Fiction .

Smith met Nick Laird at Cambridge University. They married in 2004 in the Chapel of King's College. Cambridge. Smith dedicated " On Beauty " to "my dear Laird." The couple live in Monti (rione of Rome). Rome. Italy .

*"Mirrored Box" in "The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories" (1995)
*"The Newspaper Man" in "The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories" (1996)
*"Mrs. Begum's Son and the Private Tutor" in "The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories" (1997)
*"Picnic, Lightning" in "The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories" (1997)
* [http://www.newyorker.com/archive/1999/12/27/1999_12_27_060_TNY_LIBRY_000019888 "Stuart" ] in " The New Yorker " Winter Fiction Issue 1999.
*"The Girl with Bangs" in " Timothy McSweeney's Quarterly Concern ", Issue 6, 2001.
*"The Trials of Finch" in " The New Yorker " Winter Fiction Issue 2002.
* [http://www.granta.com/Magazine/81 "Martha, Martha" ] in " Granta " 81: Best of Young British Novelists (2003)
* [http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2004/09/27/040927fi_fiction "Hanwell in Hell" ] in " The New Yorker " 27 September, 2004.
* [http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/features/2007/05/14/070514fi_fiction_smith "Handwell Snr" ] in " The New Yorker " 14 May, 2007; collected in " The Book of Other People " (2007)

*" White Teeth " (2000)
*" The Autograph Man " (2002)
*" On Beauty " (2005)

*"Piece of Flesh" (2001), an anthology of erotic short stories featuring Daren King. Toby Litt and Matt Thorne .
*" The Book of Other People " (2007)

* [http://www.eyeshot.net/zadiesmith.html "On the Road: American Writers and Their Hair" ]. essay written to be read aloud at Neal Pollack's Timothy McSweeney's Festival of Literature, Theater, and Music, 2001.
* [http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,903742,00.html "We proceed in Iraq as hypocrites and cowards - and the world knows it" ] in "The Guardian", 27 February 2003.
* [http://film.guardian.co.uk/features/featurepages/0,4120,988671,00.html "The divine Ms H" ] in "The Guardian", 1 July 2003, an essay on Katharine Hepburn .
* [http://web.archive.org/web/20050115190712/http://www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=20031103&s=smith110303&c=1&pt=tSF4JHYwozRDLhDAkawdvu%3d%3d "The Limited Circle is Pure" ] in "The New Republic", 3 November 2003, an essay on Franz Kafka for a 2005 reissue of " The Trial ", for which she also wrote a foreword.
* [http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1074217,00.html "Love, Actually" ] in "The Guardian", 1 November 2003, an essay on E. M. Forster. based on her lecture at the Gielgud Theatre in London on 22 October 2003.Fact|date=June 2008
* [http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/040614fa_fact3 "You Are In Paradise" ] in "The New Yorker", 14 June 2004, essay on holidays.
* [http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1306236,00.html "Shades of Greene" ] in "The Guardian", 18 September 2004, introduction to the centenary edition of " The Quiet American " by Graham Greene .
* [http://www.vibe.com/news/magazine_features/2005/01/cover_story_zen_eminem/ "The Zen of Eminem" ] in " VIBE " 2005, an essay on the rap star Eminem .
* [http://books.guardian.co.uk/poetry/features/0,,1429824,00.html "We are family" ] in "The Guardian", 4 March 2005, an interview by Zadie Smith with her brother Doc Brown .
* [http://www.guardian.co.uk/print/0,3858,5286007-110428,00.html "Nature's Work of Art" ] in "The Guardian", 15 September 2005, an essay on Greta Garbo .
* "Fail better" in "The Guardian", 13 January 2007, an essay on writing.
* "What does soulful mean?" in "The Guardian", 1 September 2007, an essay on Hurston 's " Their Eyes Were Watching God ".
* "F. Kafka, Everyman" in "The New York Review of Books", 17 July 2008, a review of "The Tremendous World I Have Inside My Head: Franz Kafka: A Biographical Essay", by Louis Begley.
*"Fail Better" (forthcoming, 2009), a collection of essays on writing.

* Walters, Tracey (Ed.). " [http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?vID=68806&vLang=E&vHR=1&vUR=2&vUUR=1 Zadie Smith: Critical Essays ] ." New York: Peter Lang Publications, 2008.

* [http://archive.salon.com/books/feature/2000/04/28/zadie_profile/index.html "Girl Wonder" ] on Salon.com (2000).
* [http://www.villagevoice.com/books/0538,bpress1,67959,10.html "Only Connect" ]. an interview with Zadie Smith by Joy Press of the Village Voice .
* [http://books.guardian.co.uk/departments/generalfiction/story/0,,122817,00.html She's young, black, British - and the first publishing sensation of the millennium ]. an interview with the Guardian.
* [http://www.magazine.org/content/Files/Mason.October.pdf "White Knees" ]. an essay on Smith's body of work by Wyatt Mason in the October 2005 issue of Harper's Magazine .
* [http://books.guardian.co.uk/hay/page/0,14635,1228540,00.html A doodle by Smith from "The Guardian" Hay festival 2004 ]

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Look at other dictionaries:

Zadie Smith — Zadie Smith, 2011 Zadie Smith (* 27. Oktober 1975 in Willesden, London) ist eine englische Schriftstellerin. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Leben … Deutsch Wikipedia

Zadie Smith — (n. 27 de octubre de 1975, Londres) es una escritora británica, augurada como una de las escritoras con más talento de la literatura británica actual. Ha publicado dos novelas hasta la fecha ambientadas en Londres … Wikipedia Español

Zadie Smith — Zadie Smith, née le 27 octobre 1975, est une écrivaine née de père anglais et d une mère jamaïcaine. Elle étudie à l université de Cambridge et est l auteur notamment de Sourires de loup (White Teeth), et lauréat des prix Guardian et Whitbread du … Wikipédia en Français

Zadie Smith — (n. 27 de octubre de 1975, Londres) es una escritora inglesa, augurada como una de las escritoras con más talento de la literatura británica actual. Ha publicado dos novelas hasta la fecha ambientadas en Londres … Enciclopedia Universal

Zadie — may refer to:*Zadie Department, Gabon *Zadie Smith (1975 ), English novelist … Wikipedia

Smith (Familienname) — Smith [smɪθ] (englisch smith „Schmied“) ist ein englischsprachiger Familienname. Zur Herkunft siehe Schmidt. Smith ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Bekannte Namensträger Inhaltsverzeichnis A B C D E F G H I J K L M N … Deutsch Wikipedia

Smith, Zadie — ▪ 2004 In 2003 Granta magazine named Zadie Smith one of the best young British novelists. Such praise was nothing new for the English author whose debut novel, White Teeth (2000), had created a sensation in the publishing world. The… … Universalium

Smith — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom.  Pour l’article homophone, voir Smyth. Sommaire … Wikipédia en Français

Zadie Smith Essay - Critical Essays

Zadie Smith Essay - Critical Essays

Zadie Smith is recognized for her wide-ranging, panoramic novels, deeply plotted with an extensive cast of characters. A primary theme of her work is multicultural identity. Most of her characters identify with more than one culture, country, and ethnicity. Irie Jones, the principal character of White Teeth. is the daughter of a working-class, white, British father and a Jamaican mother living in multiracial North London. Alex-Li Tandem, the protagonist of The Autograph Man. is a Chinese-Jewish North Londoner, and the Belseys of On Beauty are an interracial couple.

Smith is noted for her vivid descriptive style for settings and mannerisms, and she is especially noted for her ear for speech. Nonlinear plot development emphasizes coincidence, ambiguity, and unpredictability. Humor and irony abound in her use of language and social satire, which occasionally shades into farce. Smith’s work is not easily categorized. It is a hybrid: part popular culture and part dense literary writing. Critical reception has been mixed, perhaps because each book is so different from those that came before, because the scope of her work is vast, and because expectations have been so shaped by the amount of publicity associated with Smith.

White Teeth is a complex and multilayered novel, with a wide cast of characters and a twisting plot ranging over many years and several continents. The story follows the fortunes of two best friends, World War II buddies Archie Jones, a white working-class man married for the second time to the much younger Clara, a Jamaican woman; and Samad Iqbal, a Bangladeshi who works at an Indian restaurant in London and marries the much younger Alsana. Their children, Irie Jones and the twin Iqbal brothers, Magid and Millat, are friends in multicultural North London.

Samad, concerned that his boys are losing their cultural heritage, sends Magid to be raised by relatives in Chittagong. Irie and Millat, caught smoking marijuana in the schoolyard, agree to be tutored by classmate Joshua Chalfen in order to avoid harsher consequences. The Jewish, Catholic, atheist Chalfens are a stereotypical white liberal family, delighted to welcome such multicultural diversity into their home. Irie Jones has an unrequited desire for Millat, and Joshua Chalfen has an unrequited love for Irie.

Marcus Chalfen is a genetic engineer who is working on a project called FutureMouse. The many threads of the novel come together at the event that introduces FutureMouse to the public. All the living characters are present: the senior Joneses and Iqbals; Irie who has embraced her Jamaican ancestry by returning to live with her grandmother and decided to go to university under the influence of the educated Chalfens; Joshua Chalfen, who has defied his father by becoming an animal-rights activist; Magid, who has become Marcus’s protégé and publicist; and Millat, whose militant Islamic group has determined to disrupt the event. Coincidences abound, chance meetings occur, and all attempts to control outcomes fail; the event ends in chaos, and FutureMouse escapes.

The novel ends with a snapshot of the future: On December 31, 1999, Irie Jones and Joshua Chalfen, now lovers, are in Jamaica with Irie’s grandmother. Irie’s daughter, now seven years old, is with them. Just before the FutureMouse.

(The entire section is 1386 words.)

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Zadie Smith - The Full Wiki

Zadie Smith: Wikis Biography Early life

Zadie Smith was born Sadie Smith in the northwest London borough of Brent – a largely working-class area – to a Jamaican mother, Yvonne Bailey, and an English father, Harvey Smith. Her mother had grown up in Jamaica and immigrated to England in 1969. Their marriage was her father's second. She has a half-sister, a half-brother, and two younger brothers, one of whom is the rapper and stand-up comedian Doc Brown and the other is rapper Luc Skyz. As a child she was fond of tap dancing ; as a teenager she considered a career as an actress in musical theatre ; and as a university student she earned money as a jazz singer and wanted to become a journalist .

Her parents divorced when she was a teenager. When she was 14, she changed her name to "Zadie." Despite earlier ambitions, literature emerged as her principal interest and would provide a model for her future career.

Education and career

Smith attended the local state schools, Malorees Junior School and Hampstead Comprehensive School. and King's College. Cambridge University where she studied English literature. In an interview with the Guardian in 2000, Smith was keen to correct a recent newspaper assertion that she left Cambridge with a double First. "Actually, I got a Third in my Part Ones", she said. At Cambridge she published a number of short stories in a collection of student writing (see Short stories ) called the May Anthologies . These attracted the attention of a publisher who offered her a contract for her first novel. Smith decided to contact a literary agent and was taken on by the Wylie Agency on the basis of little more than a first chapter.

Zadie Smith seems to have been rejected for a place in the Cambridge Footlights by the popular British comedy double act Mitchell and Webb. whilst all three were studying at Cambridge University in the 1990s. [ 3 ]

White Teeth was introduced to the publishing world in 1997, long before it was completed. On the basis of a partial manuscript an auction among different publishers for the rights started, with Hamish Hamilton being successful. Smith completed White Teeth during her final year at Cambridge. Published in 2000, the novel became a bestseller immediately. It was praised internationally and won a number of awards (see Novels ). The novel was adapted for television in 2002 by Channel 4. She also served as "writer in residence" at the ICA in London and subsequently published as editor an anthology of sex writing, Piece of Flesh. as the culmination of this role.

In interviews she reported that the hype surrounding her first novel had caused her to suffer a short spell of writer's block. Nevertheless, her second novel, The Autograph Man. was published in 2002 and was a commercial success, although the critical response was not as close to unanimously positive as it had been to White Teeth .

After the publication of The Autograph Man . Smith visited the United States as a 2002–2003 Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellow at Harvard University. [ 4 ] She started work on a still unreleased book of essays, The Morality of the Novel. aka 'Fail Better', in which she considers a selection of 20th century writers through the lens of moral philosophy. Some portions of this book presumably are included in the essay collection Changing My Mind. published in November of 2009.

The second novel was followed by another, On Beauty . published in September 2005 and which is set largely in and around Greater Boston and which attracted more acclaim. This third novel was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. and won the 2006 Orange Prize for Fiction .

While currently teaching fiction at Columbia University School of the Arts. she will be joining New York University as a tenured professor of fiction as of September 1, 2010.

Private life

Smith met Nick Laird at Cambridge University. They married in 2004 in the Chapel of King's College. Cambridge. Smith dedicated On Beauty to "my dear Laird." The couple lived in Monti. Rome. Italy from November 2006–2007 and are now based between New York City and Queen's Park, London. [ 6 ] They have a daughter, Katherine, born late 2009 [ 7 ]

Works Short stories
  • "Mirrored Box" in The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories (1995)
  • "The Newspaper Man" in The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories (1996)
  • "Mrs. Begum's Son and the Private Tutor" in The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories (1997)
  • "Picnic, Lightning" in The May Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge Short Stories (1997)
  • "Stuart" in The New Yorker Winter Fiction Issue 1999.
  • "The Girl with Bangs" in Timothy McSweeney's Quarterly Concern . Issue 6, 2001.
  • "The Trials of Finch" in The New Yorker Winter Fiction Issue 2002.
  • "Martha, Martha" in Granta 81: Best of Young British Novelists (2003)
  • "Hanwell in Hell" in The New Yorker 27 September, 2004.
  • "Hanwell Snr" in The New Yorker 14 May, 2007; collected in The Book of Other People (2007)
Novels Edited Collections Non-Fiction
  • "On the Road: American Writers and Their Hair". essay written to be read aloud at Neal Pollack's Timothy McSweeney's Festival of Literature, Theater, and Music, 2001.
  • "We proceed in Iraq as hypocrites and cowards - and the world knows it" in The Guardian. 27 February 2003.
  • "The divine Ms H" in The Guardian. 1 July 2003, an essay on Katharine Hepburn .
  • "The Limited Circle is Pure" in The New Republic. 3 November 2003, an essay on Franz Kafka for a 2005 reissue of The Trial . for which she also wrote a foreword.
  • "Love, Actually" in The Guardian. 1 November 2003, an essay on E. M. Forster. based on her lecture at the Gielgud Theatre in London on 22 October 2003. [citation needed ]
  • "You Are In Paradise" in The New Yorker. 14 June 2004, essay on holidays.
  • "Shades of Greene" in The Guardian. 18 September 2004, introduction to the centenary edition of The Quiet American by Graham Greene .
  • "The Zen of Eminem" in VIBE 2005, an essay on the rap star Eminem .
  • "We are family" in The Guardian. 4 March 2005, an interview by Zadie Smith with her brother Doc Brown .
  • "Nature's Work of Art" in The Guardian. 15 September 2005, an essay on Greta Garbo .
  • "Fail better" in The Guardian. 13 January 2007, an essay on writing.
  • "What does soulful mean?" in The Guardian. 1 September 2007, an essay on Hurston 's Their Eyes Were Watching God .
  • "F. Kafka, Everyman" in The New York Review of Books. 17 July 2008, a review of The Tremendous World I Have Inside My Head: Franz Kafka: A Biographical Essay. by Louis Begley.
  • "Dead man laughing" in The New Yorker. 22 & 29 December 2008, a personal history of humour appreciation in her family.
  • Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays (Penguin Press, 12 November 2009), a collection of essays on writing.
  • "An essay is an act of imagination. It still takes quite as much art as fiction" in The Guardian. 21 November 2009, an essay on the novel.
Notes References
  • Tew, Philip. Zadie Smith. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
  • Walters, Tracey (Ed.). Zadie Smith: Critical Essays . New York: Peter Lang Publications, 2008.
External links Attributed

"Most literary prizes are only nominally about literature. They are really about brand consolidation for beer companies, phone companies, coffee companies and even frozen food companies." -- A blog signed by Zadie Smith

Sourced White Teeth (2000)
  • The more blessed she felt on earth, the more rarely she turned to heaven.
  • You hear girls in the toilets of clubs saying, 'Yeah, he fucked off and left me. He just couldn't deal with love. He was too fucked up to know how to love me.' Now how did that happen? What was it about this unlovable century that convinced us we were, despite everything, eminently lovable as a people, as a species? What made us think that anyone who fails to love us is damaged, lacking, malfunctioning in some way? And particularly if they replace us with a god, or a weeping madonna, or the face of Christ in a ciabatta roll--then we call them crazy. Deluded. Regressive. We are so convinced of the goodness of ourselves, and the goodness of our love, we cannot bear to believe that their might be something more worthy of love than us, more worthy of worship. Greeting cards routinely tell us everybody deserves love. No. Everybody deserves clean water. Not everybody deserves love all the time.
  • His mind was a small thing with big holes through which passions regularly seeped out.
  • The thinnest covering of luck was on him like fresh dew. While he slipped in and out of consciousness. the position of the planets, the music of the spheres, the flap of a tiger moth's diaphanous wings in Central Africa, and a whole bunch of other stuff that makes shit happen had decided it was second-chance time for Archie.
  • This is what divorce is: Taking things you no longer want from people you no longer love.
  • Ryan's freckles were a join-the-dot's enthusiast's wet dream.
  • ..and the devil won another easy hand in God's poker game.
  • . dressed all in yellow spreading warmth and the promise of sex.
  • . and catholics give out forgiveness at the same time politicians give out promises and whores give out.
  • Is there anything more likely to take the shine off an affair that when the lover strikes up a convivial relationship with the lovee's mother.
  • A past tense, future perfect kind of night.
  • But why do they always have to be laughing and making a song-and-dance about everything? I cannot believe homosexuality is that much fun. Heterosexuality certainly is not.
  • He talked and talked, the kind of talking you do to stave off the inevitable physical desire. The kind of talk that only increases it.
  • Revelation is where all crazy people end up. It's the last stop on the nutso express.
  • Because this is the other thing about immigrants: they cannot escape their history any more than you yourself can lose your shadow.
The Autograph Man (2002)
  • His death is like the soft down on the back of your hand, passing unnoticed in the firmest of handshakes, though the slightest breeze makes every damn one of the tiny hairs stand on end.
On Beauty (2005)
  • The greatest lie ever told about love is that it sets you free.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 424
  • A carefully preserved English accent also upped the fear factor.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 155
  • It was in the shady groves of dictionaries that Jack fell in love.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 54
  • You don't have favorites among your children but you do have allies.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 167
  • He traced the genealogy of the feeling
    • Unspecified edition, p. 179
  • He was bookish, she was not; he was theoretical, she political. She called a rose a rose. He called it an accumulation of cultural and biological contructions circulating around the mutually attracting binary poles of nature/artifice.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 225
  • In a whisper he began begging for—and, as the sun set, received—the concession people always beg for: a little more time.
    • Unspecified edition, p. 398
External links

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Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays by Zadie Smith - The 665th Greatest Nonfiction Book of All Time

Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays by Zadie Smith

"[These essays] reflect a lively, unselfconscious, rigorous, erudite, and earnestly open mind that's busy refining its view of life, literature, and a great deal in between." -Los Angeles Times Split into five sections-Reading, Being, Seeing, Feeling, and Remembering--Changing My Mind finds Zadie Smith casting an acute eye over material both personal and cultural. This engaging collection of essays-some published here for the first time-reveals Smith as a passionate and precise essayist, equally at home in the world of great books and bad movies, family and philosophy, British comedians and Italian divas. Whether writing on Katherine Hepburn, Kafka, Anna Magnani, or Zora Neale Hurston, she brings deft care to the art of criticism with a style both sympathetic and insightful. Changing My Mind is journalism at its most expansive, intelligent, and funny-a gift to readers and writers both.

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  • White Teeth Essays

    White Teeth Zadie Smith

    White Teeth literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of White Teeth.

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    White Teeth Essays The Garden of Ideology: Leafs and Leaflets in Zadie Smith's White Teeth Juliette Tang

    "Oh fuck me, another leaflet? You can't fucking move-pardon my French-but you can't move for leaflets in Norf London these days" (373). Leaflets, brochures, letters, and other forms of publication and circulation are recurrent motifs in White.

    Family Relationships in White Teeth, Disgrace and Things Fall Apart Anonymous

    By comparing White Teeth with at least one other appropriate text, explore the presentation of family and family relationships in postcolonial literature.

    The ‘metanarrative’ of Zadie Smith’s White Teeth differs from the direct linear narrative of.

    Origin and Resolution in White Teeth and Autobiography of My Mother. Anonymous

    Jamaica Kincaid’s The Autobiography of My Mother and Zadie Smith’s White Teeth are texts primarily concerned with the process and results of colonization. Both follow the progression of the post-colonized generations, and both depict the struggle.

    Perceptions Of Cultural Purity in White Teeth Ashley Ackerman

    White Teeth, by Zadie Smith, provides complex characters whose psychology provides insight into the meaning of the novel. Samad Miah Iqbal is one character whose psychosis corresponds with the main theme. He chose to immigrate to England in order.

    Cultural Diversity in White Teeth Anonymous

    The search for identity in Zadie Smith’s White Teeth is one of the threads that Smith continually weaves throughout her novel. At one point or another, each character deals with the inevitable question of “Who am I?” From Irie’s search for an.

    White Teeth: Assimilation and Identity in Postcolonial Europe Anonymous College

    Since even before its publication in 2000, Zadie Smith’s debut novel White Teeth has been surrounded by intense hype and media publicity. Smith’s status as a young black female writer who received a quarter million pounds advance on a first book.

    Finding a "Neutral Place": Postcolonialism Pitted Against Predeterminism in Zadie Smith's White Teeth Anonymous College

    Because postcolonial studies focuses on historical impacts of cross-cultural assimilation following World War II, it is closely linked with determinism, the notion that every event has an historical antecedent causing the present event's.

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