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What Are Traits of Inconsiderate People?

What Are Traits of Inconsiderate People?

People may or may not know they are being inconsiderate to others simply because they are not aware of their actions. Sometimes people are inconsiderate because they are distracted with all the things going on around them. Either way, acting inconsiderately can affect your relationships with others. Knowing what inconsiderate actions are and learning how to deal with inconsiderate people are important in being able to interact positively with others.

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Considering the Meaning

Being inconsiderate can be defined as careless of the rights or feelings of others. Inconsiderate people may also act without respect for the rights or feelings of others and being thoughtless towards others. Those who possess these traits are often referred to as inconsiderate people.

Inconsiderate Behavior

People of all ages can behave inconsiderately in dozens of ways. Some examples include making people wait for long periods of time, cancelling plans at the last minute, eating the last piece of pie without asking if anyone else wants it or planning a vacation where all the activities are not suitable for everyone. Teens can be inconsiderate by playing loud music or coming home past curfew and children can be inconsiderate when they don't want to take turns playing with a toy.

Inconsiderate Dealings

Although you can't control the behavior of inconsiderate people, you can control how you deal or respond to them. Dealing with inconsiderate people depends on who is being inconsiderate, such as a child, a co-worker or a friend. A child can be dealt with by teaching them right from wrong and by scolding them for their actions. All Business advises that the best way to deal with an inconsiderate co-worker is to confront them in a kind manner but as privately as possible to maintain professionalism. If the person exhibiting inconsiderate behavior is a friend, you can tell them how you feel about the situation and if they continue being inconsiderate you can rethink your friendship.

Considerately Thoughtful

The book, "Choosing Civility: The Twenty-Five Rules of Considerate Conduct" by P.M. Forni, offers rules to help you become a more considerate person. Each of the rules that are outlined, such as "think twice before asking favors," "respect others' opinions" and "give constructive criticism" can be put into practice so that you can connect with others in a positive manner. A simple way of becoming a more considerate person is to reflect on how your actions affects others, and to think if this is how you would want to be treated.

Other articles

Inconsiderate - definition of inconsiderate by The Free Dictionary

inconsiderate

inconsiderate - lacking regard for the rights or feelings of others; "shockingly inconsiderate behavior"

selfish - concerned chiefly or only with yourself and your advantage to the exclusion of others; "Selfish men were. trying to make capital for themselves out of the sacred cause of civil rights"- Maria Weston Chapman

tactless. untactful - lacking or showing a lack of what is fitting and considerate in dealing with others; "in the circumstances it was tactless to ask her age"

thoughtless - showing lack of careful thought; "the debate turned into thoughtless bickering"

considerate - showing concern for the rights and feelings of others; "friends considerate enough to leave us alone"

inconsiderate - without proper consideration or reflection; "slovenly inconsiderate reasoning"; "unconsidered words"; "prejudice is the holding of unconsidered opinions"

thoughtless - showing lack of careful thought; "the debate turned into thoughtless bickering"

inconsiderate

I couldn't stand it if you boys were inconsiderate. or thought of her as if she were just somebody who looked after you.

Elton might not be of an imprudent, inconsiderate disposition as to money matters; he might naturally be rather attentive than otherwise to them; but then, Mr.

Here is a woman who has grown old in your service, and in your father's service before you; a woman who has contrived, in all sorts of small, underhand ways, to presume systematically on her position for years and years past; a woman, in short, whom your inconsiderate but perfectly natural kindness has allowed to claim a right of property in you -- "

You only said something weak and inconsiderate ,' he replied.

In this manner did Prince John endeavour to lay the foundation of a popularity, which he was perpetually throwing down by some inconsiderate act of wanton aggression upon the feelings and prejudices of the people.

Had she then been unjust to Jane, or inconsiderate to Agatha?

They advanced towards a theatre that stood on one side of the meadow decked with carpets and boughs, where they were to plight their troth, and from which they were to behold the dances and plays; but at the moment of their arrival at the spot they heard a loud outcry behind them, and a voice exclaiming, "Wait a little, ye, as inconsiderate as ye are hasty

But his death 'will be the seed' of many disciples who will convince them of their evil ways, and will come forth to reprove them in harsher terms, because they are younger and more inconsiderate .

The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.

The barbarous and inconsiderate greed of these fishermen will one day cause the disappearance of the last whale in the ocean.

He left the mercer quite astonished at his singular farewell, and asking himself if he had not been a little inconsiderate .

Therefore," continued Valentine, looking playfully at Maximilian, "no more inconsiderate actions -- no more rash projects; for you surely would not wish to compromise one who from this day regards herself as destined, honorably and happily, to bear your name?

Consumer behavior Paper by

consumer behavior

Consumer Behavior. YouTube

Today. companies take extreme care when formulating and executing advertising campaigns. A special attention is given to the message of an advertisement and its impact on potential consumers. Through the image of advertisement. marketers grab attention of consumers with a visual surprise and slogan. Communication occurs through the image (symbol depicted on the advertisement and through the color. YouTube bases its advertisements on attitudes and unique perception of the products promoted by the company taking into account various stages of consumers behavior and learning theories

Advertisements found in YouTube persuade customers to buy products and use proposed services. As a part of commodity culture this advertisement is based on a particular genre for particular marketing needs

In the category `Film Animation ' YouTube all advertisement are based on explicit address in that it is generally understood that advertisements ' purpose is persuasion. and this understanding frames the reception of the advertising 'message. The main concept of consumer behavior used in this category is family decision-making concept. The aim of this approach is to appeal to all family members and persuade them to buy products. `Film Animation ' uses impression management as the main tool which influenced persption of potential consumers and their buying preferences. The advertisements targeted at the whole family are 'unreflexive ' in that they do not display explicit distancing and self-conscious presentation of the advertisement 's relation to the viewer. It is important to note that the reflexive play within the textual frame of the advertisement makes explicit the bline quality of the frame itself. This highlights the advertisement 's relation to the extratextual. drawing attention to the link between text and viewer whilst also foregrounding advertising 's position in popular culture (Schiffman. Kanuk 2003

According to Schiffman and Kanuk (2003 ) consumer decision making is based on four steps. needs. motivation. alternative solutions based on product benefits and decision heuristics. For instance. an ad The Happiest Monster ' appeals to potential consumers through emotional response. Such a common set of meanings derives not only from the language. but refers more broadly to the pattern of beliefs. codes. and feelings on the basis of which people learn to live with their environment. The big idea of advertisement can be compared with a flash of insight that synthesizes the purpose of the strategy. joins the product benefit with consumer needs. and makes the viewer or audience stop. look. and listen. The message is at the heart of advertising. The conflict is based on textual meaning. the happiest ' and monster Consumers read ' the message looking at the advertisement they see a visual representation and a slogan combined with color and meaning. So advertisement is an effective tool in the business market because it embodies four main elements. visual elements. image and slogan. and non-visual elements. color and message. The construction of this ad ( The Happiest Monster ) has a significant impact on tastes and priorities of potential viewers. It provides potential consumers with human-centered behavior. inconsiderate of any outside consequences short-term.

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Also referred to as an onlooker or spectator, a bystander refers to a person who is present but does not take part in an event that involves an unacceptable behavior or a conflict (Fischer, Greitemeyer, Pollozek, and Frey 267–278). Everybody has become a bystander at some point in their lives. Bystander behavior may be done once, or repeatedly, but in general, bystander behaviors are either destructive, or likely to worsen a bad situation. Both children and adults constitute bystanders. Examples of situations which bystanders find themselves in include bullying, harassment, rudeness, discriminatory behavior, inconsideration, meanness, inappropriate advances, threats, and escalating conflict among others (Fischer et al. 267–278).

Bystanders can either contribute to the solution or problem of a given event depending on how they respond to it. There are mainly two types of bystanders i.e. active and passive bystanders (Fischer et al. 267–278). Active bystanders are people who take steps to create a difference by intervening directly, or through the support of others to stop a given situation from continuing. For instance, in the case where a bystander is witnessing someone being bullied, they can either intervene by defending the victim, discouraging the bully, or redirecting the incident away from the bullying. Passive bystanders, who are the majority, usually watch and do nothing about a given situation, and consequently, add to the problem without realizing it (Fischer et al. 267–278). Passive bystanders offer bullies the audience they crave for, and their silence permits bullies to persist hurting their victims. Other types of bystanders include those who are not active participants of the bullying but they support it via cheering, laughing or making comments that encourage the bully (Hart, and Miethe 637–651). In addition, there are disengaged onlookers who observe the bullying but show no concern, as well as, possible defenders who are against the bullying and think they should offer assistance but they do not.

Some of the reasons that make many bystanders reluctant to intervene in a situation include the fear of getting hurt in the process, the fear of retribution, not wanting to draw attention of the gathered crowd to themselves, the lack of concern, the feeling of powerlessness in stopping the bulling, dislike for the victim, and being uncertain of what to do among others (Hart, and Miethe 637–651). This paper provides my opinion regarding what I would do as a bystander of bullying or sexual harassment.

What I Would Do As a Bystander of Bullying or Sexual Harassment

It is vital to mention that the response of the bystanders indicates the stance of the community to both the bully and the victim (Hudson, and Bruckman 165–195). In the case where bystanders observe a crime taking place without intervening, the offended person usually get more infuriated at the bystander than the perpetrator for failing to take any action to help them. This might leave one feeling guilty for refusing to assist the victim (Hudson, and Bruckman 165–195). If I find myself as a bystander in a given situation, I would gladly intervene to help the victim because it is the right thing to do. Below is how I would go about my intervention:

Irrespective of whether someone is being bullied or being sexually harassed, I would first assess the situation to find out what kind of help is appropriate, evaluating the best strategy options that are likely to reduce any potential risks to both the victim and myself (Hudson, and Bruckman 165–195). I believe that the decision to make a difference in other people’s lives is not about the numbers, but the will, and therefore, notwithstanding whether I am the only person who is against the incident going on, I will immediately confront the bully to stop whatever he is doing. After which, I will try to calm down the offender and the offended person and encourage dialogue between them to determine where the problem is. Upon knowing which party is on the wrong, I will report him or her to the relevant authorities so that proper action can be taken. I challenge people to choose to be active bystanders by intervening in unacceptable behaviors to ensure that offenders are punished.

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Inconsiderate - это

Inconsiderate — In con*sid er*ate, a. [L. inconsideratus. See not, and .] [1913 Webster] 1. Not considerate; not attentive to safety or to propriety; not regarding the rights or feelings of others; hasty; careless; thoughtless; heedless; as,… … The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

inconsiderate — I adjective blind, blunt, brusque, careless, cavalier, censorious, churlish, derelict, disobliging, disregardful, flippant, harsh, heedless, ill advised, ill judged, impolitic, imprudent, inattentive, incautious, indifferent, indiscreet,… … Law dictionary

inconsiderate — (adj.) late 15c. done thoughtlessly, lit. not properly considered, from L. inconsideratus headstrong, unadvised, thoughtless, from in not, opposite of (see IN (Cf. in ) (1)) + consideratus (see CONSIDER (Cf. consider)). Related: Inconsiderately; … Etymology dictionary

inconsiderate — [adj] insensitive to others boorish, brash, careless, discourteous, hasty, impolite, incautious, indelicate, intolerant, reckless, rude, self centered, selfish, sharp, short, tactless, thoughtless, unceremonious, uncharitable, ungracious, unkind … New thesaurus

inconsiderate — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ thoughtlessly causing hurt or inconvenience to others. DERIVATIVES inconsiderately adverb inconsiderateness noun … English terms dictionary

inconsiderate — [in΄kən sid′ər it] adj. [L inconsideratus] 1. Now Rare insufficiently considered; ill advised 2. without thought or consideration for others; thoughtless; heedless inconsiderately adv. inconsiderateness n. inconsideration [in΄kən sid′ər ā′shən] … English World dictionary

inconsiderate — adj. 1) inconsiderate of (he s inconsiderate of her feelings) 2) inconsiderate to + inf. (it was inconsiderate of you to say that) * * * [ˌɪnkən sɪd(ə)rɪt] inconsiderate of (he s inconsiderate of her feelings) inconsiderate to + inf. (it was… … Combinatory dictionary

inconsiderate — in|con|sid|er|ate [ˌınkənˈsıdərıt] adj not caring about the feelings, needs, or comfort of other people = ↑thoughtless ≠ ↑considerate ▪ inconsiderate motorists it was inconsiderate (of sb) to do sth ▪ It was very inconsiderate of you to keep us… … Dictionary of contemporary English

inconsiderate — [[t]ɪ̱nkənsɪ̱dərət[/t]] ADJ GRADED (disapproval) If you accuse someone of being inconsiderate, you mean that they do not take enough care over how their words or actions will affect other people. Motorists were criticised for being inconsiderate… … English dictionary

inconsiderate — inconsiderately, adv. inconsiderateness, inconsideration, n. /in keuhn sid euhr it/, adj. 1. without due regard for the rights or feelings of others: It was inconsiderate of him to keep us waiting. 2. acting without consideration; thoughtless;… … Universalium

inconsiderate — adjective /ˌɪnkənˈsɪdərɪt,ˌɪŋ / Not considerate of others, thoughtless. Failing to replace the roll after using last of the toilet paper is very inconsiderate. Ant: considerate … Wiktionary

Inconsiderate behavior

inconsiderate behavior Look at other dictionaries:

behavior — AE spelling n. 1) to exhibit behavior (to exhibit strange behavior) 2) abnormal; asocial; criminal; diplomatic; disciplined; disruptive; inconsiderate; inexcusable; infantile; irrational; model; modest; neurotic; normal; obsequious; promiscuous;… … Combinatory dictionary

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Air rage: Behind bad behavior on planes

Mashable Air rage: Behind bad behavior on planes

Image: Mutlu Kurtbas

Leon James, Professor of Psychology at University of Hawaii for The Conversation 2014-12-24 13:15:26 UTC

People do disgusting and disruptive things on airplanes. They show little regard or patience for fellow passengers and their needs. Inconsiderate behavior on the part of passengers can make air travel an unpleasant hassle for everyone. The 2014 annual Expedia Airplane Etiquette Study ranked the top on-board etiquette violators as reported by passengers:

Rear Seat Kicker: cited by 67% of study respondents

Inattentive Parents: 64%

The Aromatic Passenger: 56%

The Audio Insensitive (talking or music): 51%

Chatty Cathy: 43%

The IATA received more than 8,000 complaints of unruly passengers in 2013. Is it any wonder air rage is on the upswing?

Consider that up to 16 million Americans may have Intermittent Explosive Disorder. which causes them lash out inappropriately at people and things – and that’s when they’re nowhere near an airport. The Federal Aviation Administration defines air rage as a passenger’s explosive and unpredictable behavior occasioned by congested travel, unexpected delays, or negative interactions with other passengers and flight personnel. From this point of view, the list of etiquette violators doesn’t really fall within the air rage definition. But from a psychological point of view, the story is different.

Mental air rage, silent epidemic

What safety and health officials call “explosive air rage” spills out into the public sphere for everyone to witness; these are the verbal attacks on passengers and personnel by someone yelling profanities, threats, complaints, and insults. “Mental air rage ,” on the other hand, is emotional and private. Most people try to suppress mental air rage and prevent it from showing publicly for various reasons including fear, embarrassment, rational self control or compassion. It’s psychologically very real even though it’s far less visible than its explosive counterpart.

Mental air rage is just one aspect of the stressed out feelings that go along with the uncertainties and negative emotions of travel and transportation. This charged negative emotional background exists below the surface of consciousness and can lead to a simmering feeling of resentment throughout the travel experience.

So it’s not just “that guy” who could blow up at an airline employee when his plane is delayed yet again. Any traveler faces a real risk that at an unpredictable moment the silent air rage simmering below the surface may spring out suddenly as full-blown explosive air rage.

Changes for the worse in passenger environment

Airlines contribute to harsh and unfriendly traveling conditions when their economic policies create an artificial climate of scarcity, competition and enmity among passengers.

The list of contributors to the deteriorating environment for airline passengers is a familiar one. Airlines have reduced legroom and seat width. Checked bag fees encourage passengers to bring more and more on board, leading to battles over limited storage space. The elimination of in-flight meals causes passengers to bring their own odorous food. Policies on personal electronic devices are unclear and inconsistently enforced. Bottomline, the cabins are overloaded.

All of these factors increase the mental load on travelers. From there it’s a small step for inconsiderate actions to trigger negative and anti-social behaviors in waiting rooms, airplanes and lavatories. For instance, entering a lavatory on board an airplane and finding it in a disgusting used condition creates an emotional and psychological shock. We are not only repelled and annoyed, but we also feel aggressed against. This stressful situation can ratchet up the mental air rage.

How to peacefully prevent air rage

To reduce the unpleasantness of travel and the likelihood of air rage, passengers can bring things along to take care of their own comfort – reading materials, climate appropriate clothing, snacks, games and so on. Chatty passengers can form a mini-support group with one or more fellow travelers, sharing and consulting with each other on whatever travel problems are encountered. This tactic can help defuse stressful situations that could otherwise escalate. Even just having alternate scenarios worked out in case you don’t arrive when expected can minimize mental air rage.

My research suggests some ways airlines can help prevent these incidents as well, via more enlightened crowd management techniques:

When people are waiting, they should be provided with a continuous stream of updated information every five minutes via a variety of formats and media: electric board, signs, announcements, and face-to-face interactions.

Elevate the importance of the traveler’s comfort whenever implementing changes. Apologize if decent seating is unavailable. Make up for it by giving something else in return so the traveler doesn’t feel cheated or neglected.

Manage lines with more compassion. People shouldn’t stand in line when they can sit and wait. People shouldn’t have to compete physically with each other for an airplane seat.

Follow compassionate principles to create a social group out of the anonymous people in the waiting room or on the airplane. Encourage discussion among the waiting people. Form a support group out of them so they can assist each other and give each other help, ideas, and support.

Airlines should train employees in techniques that can prevent air rage incidents in the first place as well as how safely to de-escalate episodes once they’ve begun. After all, air rage isn’t just another unpleasant aspect of traveling – it can put everyone onboard at risk.

This article originally published at The Conversation here

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Rude and Inconsiderate Behavior: Declining Civility in America - Ethics Sage

Rude and Inconsiderate Behavior: Declining Civility in America

Thoughtlessness is at Alarming Levels in the U.S.

I recently returned from a trip to Florida and kept notes on the various types of rude and thoughtless behavior of those I observed or interacted with during the trip. While I am a frequent critic of ethics in America and the loss of civility, I hadn’t focused on another aspect of such behavior which grows from selfishness to inconsideration of others. As you read this blog think of your own experiences. Are you guilty of such behavior? If so, please consider that those around you might be offended by your actions and that our behavior should always be based on how our actions affect others if we are to be an ethical society. If you, like I, have been offended by such behavior, then please consider writing me and adding to the list based on your experiences. For blog size limitation-purposes and to make this blog more interesting, I’ve listed the behaviors in a ‘top five’ list.

5. Using one’s fingers to eat food on a plate that is not ribs or other ‘finger-eating’ food.

Given what we know about hygiene and cleanliness, this one is beyond my comprehension.

4. Cutting in line to be serviced before others.

I’ve seen this at movie theaters and supermarkets where someone walks up to a long line and takes his/her place in the middle stating that I just went to get something from my car a shelf, or provides some other lame reason.

3. Talking in the movie theater/smart phone left on.

Regardless of the admonition not to do it, including Geico’s ‘Hump Day Camel’ commercial, people still leave their cell phones on and some talk to their neighbor during the movie. I don’t get it. This is like smoking in the theater – it’s a faux pas.

2. Cutting you off on the highway and speeding up when you are trying to change lanes into the lane that person is in. I guess this is a way of saying I own this lane. Get out of my way. The other driver may think you are rude in trying to change lanes but as long as it done safely, it’s the other driver who is rude by speeding up to make it more difficult for you to change lanes.

1. Taking your shoes off and bearing one’s naked feet in public.

I observed this behavior both in movie theaters and the airplane. It’s gross to say the least. What makes a person believe others around them want to look at their feet?

These are only basic etiquette items that I have listed. I have not included the most offensive of the rude behaviors including: inappropriate sexual advances/words/actions; discriminatory/hate speech; and bullying/cyber-bullying. These are occurring with alarming frequency in part due to the availability of social media sites.

Civility is a basic ethical value of the Founding Fathers. George Washington addressed it when he transcribed Rules of Civility & Decent Behaviour In Company and Conversation. He included actions of the times that were considered inappropriate. While the times have changed since then, the notion of civility as an important American value has not even though Congress and other political leaders seem to violate it all the time. Talk show hosts seem to have embraced incivility and rudeness in speech as part of their DNA.

I conclude with a little known citation from my world of academe. Professor P.M. Forni at John Hopkins University co-founded the Johns Hopkins Civility Project in 1997.  He is quoted as saying: “Civility means a great deal more than just being nice to one another. It is complex and encompasses learning how to connect successfully and live well with others, developing thoughtfulness, and fostering effective self-expression and communication. Civility includes courtesy, politeness, mutual respect, fairness, good manners, as well as a matter of good health. Taking an active interest in the well-being of our community and concern for the health of our society is also involved in civility.”

Blog posted by Steven Mintz, aka Ethics Sage, on January 2, 2014

Comments

Rude and Inconsiderate Behavior: Declining Civility in America

Thoughtlessness is at Alarming Levels in the U.S.

I recently returned from a trip to Florida and kept notes on the various types of rude and thoughtless behavior of those I observed or interacted with during the trip. While I am a frequent critic of ethics in America and the loss of civility, I hadn’t focused on another aspect of such behavior which grows from selfishness to inconsideration of others. As you read this blog think of your own experiences. Are you guilty of such behavior? If so, please consider that those around you might be offended by your actions and that our behavior should always be based on how our actions affect others if we are to be an ethical society. If you, like I, have been offended by such behavior, then please consider writing me and adding to the list based on your experiences. For blog size limitation-purposes and to make this blog more interesting, I’ve listed the behaviors in a ‘top five’ list.

5. Using one’s fingers to eat food on a plate that is not ribs or other ‘finger-eating’ food.

Given what we know about hygiene and cleanliness, this one is beyond my comprehension.

4. Cutting in line to be serviced before others.

I’ve seen this at movie theaters and supermarkets where someone walks up to a long line and takes his/her place in the middle stating that I just went to get something from my car a shelf, or provides some other lame reason.

3. Talking in the movie theater/smart phone left on.

Regardless of the admonition not to do it, including Geico’s ‘Hump Day Camel’ commercial, people still leave their cell phones on and some talk to their neighbor during the movie. I don’t get it. This is like smoking in the theater – it’s a faux pas.

2. Cutting you off on the highway and speeding up when you are trying to change lanes into the lane that person is in. I guess this is a way of saying I own this lane. Get out of my way. The other driver may think you are rude in trying to change lanes but as long as it done safely, it’s the other driver who is rude by speeding up to make it more difficult for you to change lanes.

1. Taking your shoes off and bearing one’s naked feet in public.

I observed this behavior both in movie theaters and the airplane. It’s gross to say the least. What makes a person believe others around them want to look at their feet?

These are only basic etiquette items that I have listed. I have not included the most offensive of the rude behaviors including: inappropriate sexual advances/words/actions; discriminatory/hate speech; and bullying/cyber-bullying. These are occurring with alarming frequency in part due to the availability of social media sites.

Civility is a basic ethical value of the Founding Fathers. George Washington addressed it when he transcribed Rules of Civility & Decent Behaviour In Company and Conversation. He included actions of the times that were considered inappropriate. While the times have changed since then, the notion of civility as an important American value has not even though Congress and other political leaders seem to violate it all the time. Talk show hosts seem to have embraced incivility and rudeness in speech as part of their DNA.

I conclude with a little known citation from my world of academe. Professor P.M. Forni at John Hopkins University co-founded the Johns Hopkins Civility Project in 1997.  He is quoted as saying: “Civility means a great deal more than just being nice to one another. It is complex and encompasses learning how to connect successfully and live well with others, developing thoughtfulness, and fostering effective self-expression and communication. Civility includes courtesy, politeness, mutual respect, fairness, good manners, as well as a matter of good health. Taking an active interest in the well-being of our community and concern for the health of our society is also involved in civility.”

Blog posted by Steven Mintz, aka Ethics Sage, on January 2, 2014

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