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Moral Poverty Essay, Research Paper

In the book Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Drugs. By William J. Bennet, John J. DiIiulio, and John P. Walters, we learn about crime on the streets, the causes, what is being done to reduce it, and what should be done to end it. Our authors state that crime is a result of moral poverty. They define moral poverty as the poverty of being without loving, capable, responsible adults who teach right from wrong. ( Bennet 1996) throughout this paper I will discuss the major points of this book, what the authors believe the primary cause of crime is, and what can be done in treatment and corrections to address the major issues of crime.To start the book contains many, many statistics to back what the authors are saying. To keep with in the constraints of the paper, I am going to present the author s ideas without the statistical data to back it up. I feel that the statistical information presented is true and needs not to be presented again.The authors say that the reason crime spawns is because of moral poverty. In a world of child abuse, broken homes, murder, rape, drug trafficking and abuse children have no choice but to repeat what they see. The one thing that keeps children from becoming criminals is the nurturing support of adults around them. Without this positive adult role model to teach the difference between right and wrong, the child learns how to get along in life any way possible, no matter who or what gets in their way. Children are little processors that learn and repeat whatever they experience. When all they see is crime, they tend to repeat the crime and thus become criminals themselves. In addition to how criminals come to be, we also see that today s youths are the youngest, biggest, and baddest generation any society has ever known. (Bennet 1996) Our authors call this new wave of criminals Super-Predators. They have no remorse for anything they do. Nothing is sacred to them. The only thing that drives them is sex, money and drugs. These criminals have surpassed being in a knife fight once a year to being involved in a drive-by shooting every night. In addition to moral poverty, alcohol and drugs feed into the criminal mentality. Not to say that alcohol drives people to crime, but most people prone to crime escalate their criminal tendencies with the consumption of alcohol. The most prevalent crimes committed under the effects of alcohol are those of violence. Our authors make the judgment that easy availability increases consumption and consumption increases the incidence of disorder crime and other incidents (Bennet, 1996). Therefore, what can we do reduce alcohol consumption without prohibition? Probably the best answer to this question is to raise the price. With the increase in price of alcohol, consumption by youths will decline and thus so will alcohol related crimes. Another way to reduce the consumption of alcohol is to reduce the availability of alcohol. Our authors show the correlation between high crime areas and the number of alcohol outlets. The less the number of alcohol outlets the less the crime rates for the area. So a reduction in places to purchase alcohol will lead to less violent crimes.The next major point discussed in the book is the restraining and punishment of street criminals. We learn of some disturbing facts about our criminal justice system in America. There is a correlation between crimes punished and crimes committed. The harsher the sentencing of convicted criminals the less crime is committed. Is this to say that punishment is a deterrent of crime? Yes it is. Yet, we see more and more criminals sentenced to parole and probation, which is viewed as a token punishment. A large percentage of these criminals go back into society and commit more crimes. The people who are given parole and probation are violent criminals who already have been convicted on numerous charges. Another fact about the prison inmates is that almost half of them are spending time for crimes they committed while on parole and probation. This is not to say that we should eliminate parole and probation all together. It would be too costly and many offenders do not recidivate while in these programs. Still some serious reforms need to be made. The problem with these programs is that they are too lenient. The average amount of money spent on a probationer is around $200. In addition, probation officers are not to blame for the problem because their caseloads are too much for anyone to handle. What our authors say we need to do is keep offenders in prison longer and devote more resources to the system for probation. We need a separate law enforcement agency to oversee probationers and keep them from committing future offenses. Our system today needs to be stricter and more confined to deter future offenses.The next main point is drug abuse and the correlation between drug abuse and crime. Our authors say that drug use is a catalyst to crime because it makes young men, young women, and even children morally irresponsible. (Bennett, 1996) For criminals, drugs cause their crimes to be more severe and easier to commit. Drugs add to the moral poverty in this country because they make every other social problem much worse. They increase child abuse, infant mortality, violent crime, prostitution, poverty, family disintegration, economic decay, and the spread of HIV. (Bennet, 1996) However, this problem with drugs is not unbeatable.

During the 1980 s drug use declined dramatically. During this time, more resources were spent to teach kids to Just say no. and it worked. With a more liberal government, things took place to change the downward spiral of drug abuse in this country. There was a change in opinion about how much of our national resources should go to drug education. There was an 80% drop in funding to The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). A more liberal government replaced the Reagan and Bush era with investigations into the legalization of drugs. Attorney General Janet Reno felt that drug crimes were treated to harshly with mandatory sentences complaining that too many drug dealers are in prison. The number of drug offense prosecutions dropped 12% in just two years. The number of ships and aircraft devoted to drug interdiction were slashed by 50%. In addition, legislation passed more lenient laws allowing trucks to enter this country from the southwest without inspection. Not a single pound of cocaine was confiscated from more than two million trucks that passed through the three busiest entry points along the southwest border where federal officials say most of the drug enters the country. (Bennet, 1996) To beat this problem, we need to look back and repeat some things we were doing simply because they worked. It is time to take back control of our country. We must take a strong position in the war against drugs. Our authors give us some ideas we need to do to stop the drug epidemic and thus reduce moral poverty. First, we must teach our children that drug use is bad. If we do not teach this, children will think that drug abuse is not bad and follow all those who were and now are addicts. Second, we must put open-air drug markets out of business. These markets open the door for addiction because they are always there ready to sell drugs. They also show that the community tolerates drug sales and use. Our government must also take action. They need to impose sanctions against foreign countries that provide drugs to our country. The longer the United States allows these countries to get away with this, the stronger they become and the harder it will be to stop them. The government also needs to make drug interdicting a top national security priority. We have one of the most powerful militaries in the world, if we get them out and about stopping drugs coming into the country it will cease. Even the most powerful drug lords are no match for the U.S. Military. Finally, we need to destroy the drug trafficking organizations inside our country. Our authors feel that the attorney general should be responsible for reporting on all known drug trafficking organizations and deploying federal enforcement personal to destroy their operations. Government could also impose a policy that would generate funds for federal drug enforcement agencies. All of the problems in our country come back to moral poverty. We need to strengthen our bonds with our children to become safe and respectable community. With the moral deterioration of our society come horrors that were unheard of fifty years ago. Today jails contain more people than ever and church enrollment is at an all time lowest. It is our duty to come back to religion and resolve any and all problems we have. Religion is our one defense against moral poverty. Our authors say the good needs constant reinforcement and the bad needs only permission. (Bennet, 1996) Such things like the legalization of abortion, has led us to believe that going against the moral fiber of our forefathers is OK. True religious faith enlarges the human heart; inspires us to revere and honor those things that are worthy things of our attention; reminds people of their basic responsibilities and commitments; provides society with are liable moral and social guardrails; helps the impulse of compassion take on the name of action; and allows the eyes of our heart to see our fellow citizens not merely as body count statistics or as enemies or aliens or other but as moral and spiritual beings, as children of God. (Bennet, 1996) References Bennet, Willian J. John J. DiIulio, and John P. Walters. Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Crime and Drugs. NY: Simon and Shuster, 1996.

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Moral Poverty Essay Research Paper In the

Moral Poverty Essay Research Paper In the

Moral Poverty Essay, Research Paper

In the book Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Drugs. By William J. Bennet, John J. DiIiulio, and John P. Walters, we learn about crime on the streets, the causes, what is being done to reduce it, and what should be done to end it. Our authors state that crime is a result of moral poverty. They define moral poverty as the poverty of being without loving, capable, responsible adults who teach right from wrong. ( Bennet 1996) throughout this paper I will discuss the major points of this book, what the authors believe the primary cause of crime is, and what can be done in treatment and corrections to address the major issues of crime.To start the book contains many, many statistics to back what the authors are saying. To keep with in the constraints of the paper, I am going to present the author s ideas without the statistical data to back it up. I feel that the statistical information presented is true and needs not to be presented again.The authors say that the reason crime spawns is because of moral poverty. In a world of child abuse, broken homes, murder, rape, drug trafficking and abuse children have no choice but to repeat what they see. The one thing that keeps children from becoming criminals is the nurturing support of adults around them. Without this positive adult role model to teach the difference between right and wrong, the child learns how to get along in life any way possible, no matter who or what gets in their way. Children are little processors that learn and repeat whatever they experience. When all they see is crime, they tend to repeat the crime and thus become criminals themselves. In addition to how criminals come to be, we also see that today s youths are the youngest, biggest, and baddest generation any society has ever known. (Bennet 1996) Our authors call this new wave of criminals Super-Predators. They have no remorse for anything they do. Nothing is sacred to them. The only thing that drives them is sex, money and drugs. These criminals have surpassed being in a knife fight once a year to being involved in a drive-by shooting every night. In addition to moral poverty, alcohol and drugs feed into the criminal mentality. Not to say that alcohol drives people to crime, but most people prone to crime escalate their criminal tendencies with the consumption of alcohol. The most prevalent crimes committed under the effects of alcohol are those of violence. Our authors make the judgment that easy availability increases consumption and consumption increases the incidence of disorder crime and other incidents (Bennet, 1996). Therefore, what can we do reduce alcohol consumption without prohibition? Probably the best answer to this question is to raise the price. With the increase in price of alcohol, consumption by youths will decline and thus so will alcohol related crimes. Another way to reduce the consumption of alcohol is to reduce the availability of alcohol. Our authors show the correlation between high crime areas and the number of alcohol outlets. The less the number of alcohol outlets the less the crime rates for the area. So a reduction in places to purchase alcohol will lead to less violent crimes.The next major point discussed in the book is the restraining and punishment of street criminals. We learn of some disturbing facts about our criminal justice system in America. There is a correlation between crimes punished and crimes committed. The harsher the sentencing of convicted criminals the less crime is committed. Is this to say that punishment is a deterrent of crime? Yes it is. Yet, we see more and more criminals sentenced to parole and probation, which is viewed as a token punishment. A large percentage of these criminals go back into society and commit more crimes. The people who are given parole and probation are violent criminals who already have been convicted on numerous charges. Another fact about the prison inmates is that almost half of them are spending time for crimes they committed while on parole and probation. This is not to say that we should eliminate parole and probation all together. It would be too costly and many offenders do not recidivate while in these programs. Still some serious reforms need to be made. The problem with these programs is that they are too lenient. The average amount of money spent on a probationer is around $200. In addition, probation officers are not to blame for the problem because their caseloads are too much for anyone to handle. What our authors say we need to do is keep offenders in prison longer and devote more resources to the system for probation. We need a separate law enforcement agency to oversee probationers and keep them from committing future offenses. Our system today needs to be stricter and more confined to deter future offenses.The next main point

is drug abuse and the correlation between drug abuse and crime. Our authors say that drug use is a catalyst to crime because it makes young men, young women, and even children morally irresponsible. (Bennett, 1996) For criminals, drugs cause their crimes to be more severe and easier to commit. Drugs add to the moral poverty in this country because they make every other social problem much worse. They increase child abuse, infant mortality, violent crime, prostitution, poverty, family disintegration, economic decay, and the spread of HIV. (Bennet, 1996) However, this problem with drugs is not unbeatable.

During the 1980 s drug use declined dramatically. During this time, more resources were spent to teach kids to Just say no. and it worked. With a more liberal government, things took place to change the downward spiral of drug abuse in this country. There was a change in opinion about how much of our national resources should go to drug education. There was an 80% drop in funding to The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). A more liberal government replaced the Reagan and Bush era with investigations into the legalization of drugs. Attorney General Janet Reno felt that drug crimes were treated to harshly with mandatory sentences complaining that too many drug dealers are in prison. The number of drug offense prosecutions dropped 12% in just two years. The number of ships and aircraft devoted to drug interdiction were slashed by 50%. In addition, legislation passed more lenient laws allowing trucks to enter this country from the southwest without inspection. Not a single pound of cocaine was confiscated from more than two million trucks that passed through the three busiest entry points along the southwest border where federal officials say most of the drug enters the country. (Bennet, 1996) To beat this problem, we need to look back and repeat some things we were doing simply because they worked. It is time to take back control of our country. We must take a strong position in the war against drugs. Our authors give us some ideas we need to do to stop the drug epidemic and thus reduce moral poverty. First, we must teach our children that drug use is bad. If we do not teach this, children will think that drug abuse is not bad and follow all those who were and now are addicts. Second, we must put open-air drug markets out of business. These markets open the door for addiction because they are always there ready to sell drugs. They also show that the community tolerates drug sales and use. Our government must also take action. They need to impose sanctions against foreign countries that provide drugs to our country. The longer the United States allows these countries to get away with this, the stronger they become and the harder it will be to stop them. The government also needs to make drug interdicting a top national security priority. We have one of the most powerful militaries in the world, if we get them out and about stopping drugs coming into the country it will cease. Even the most powerful drug lords are no match for the U.S. Military. Finally, we need to destroy the drug trafficking organizations inside our country. Our authors feel that the attorney general should be responsible for reporting on all known drug trafficking organizations and deploying federal enforcement personal to destroy their operations. Government could also impose a policy that would generate funds for federal drug enforcement agencies. All of the problems in our country come back to moral poverty. We need to strengthen our bonds with our children to become safe and respectable community. With the moral deterioration of our society come horrors that were unheard of fifty years ago. Today jails contain more people than ever and church enrollment is at an all time lowest. It is our duty to come back to religion and resolve any and all problems we have. Religion is our one defense against moral poverty. Our authors say the good needs constant reinforcement and the bad needs only permission. (Bennet, 1996) Such things like the legalization of abortion, has led us to believe that going against the moral fiber of our forefathers is OK. True religious faith enlarges the human heart; inspires us to revere and honor those things that are worthy things of our attention; reminds people of their basic responsibilities and commitments; provides society with are liable moral and social guardrails; helps the impulse of compassion take on the name of action; and allows the eyes of our heart to see our fellow citizens not merely as body count statistics or as enemies or aliens or other but as moral and spiritual beings, as children of God. (Bennet, 1996) References Bennet, Willian J. John J. DiIulio, and John P. Walters. Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Crime and Drugs. NY: Simon and Shuster, 1996.

Реферат: Moral Poverty Essay Research Paper In the

Moral Poverty Essay, Research Paper

In the book Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Drugs. By William J. Bennet, John J. DiIiulio, and John P. Walters, we learn about crime on the streets, the causes, what is being done to reduce it, and what should be done to end it. Our authors state that crime is a result of moral poverty. They define moral poverty as the poverty of being without loving, capable, responsible adults who teach right from wrong. ( Bennet 1996) throughout this paper I will discuss the major points of this book, what the authors believe the primary cause of crime is, and what can be done in treatment and corrections to address the major issues of crime.To start the book contains many, many statistics to back what the authors are saying. To keep with in the constraints of the paper, I am going to present the author s ideas without the statistical data to back it up. I feel that the statistical information presented is true and needs not to be presented again.The authors say that the reason crime spawns is because of moral poverty. In a world of child abuse, broken homes, murder, rape, drug trafficking and abuse children have no choice but to repeat what they see. The one thing that keeps children from becoming criminals is the nurturing support of adults around them. Without this positive adult role model to teach the difference between right and wrong, the child learns how to get along in life any way possible, no matter who or what gets in their way. Children are little processors that learn and repeat whatever they experience. When all they see is crime, they tend to repeat the crime and thus become criminals themselves. In addition to how criminals come to be, we also see that today s youths are the youngest, biggest, and baddest generation any society has ever known. (Bennet 1996) Our authors call this new wave of criminals Super-Predators. They have no remorse for anything they do. Nothing is sacred to them. The only thing that drives them is sex, money and drugs. These criminals have surpassed being in a knife fight once a year to being involved in a drive-by shooting every night. In addition to moral poverty, alcohol and drugs feed into the criminal mentality. Not to say that alcohol drives people to crime, but most people prone to crime escalate their criminal tendencies with the consumption of alcohol. The most prevalent crimes committed under the effects of alcohol are those of violence. Our authors make the judgment that easy availability increases consumption and consumption increases the incidence of disorder crime and other incidents (Bennet, 1996). Therefore, what can we do reduce alcohol consumption without prohibition? Probably the best answer to this question is to raise the price. With the increase in price of alcohol, consumption by youths will decline and thus so will alcohol related crimes. Another way to reduce the consumption of alcohol is to reduce the availability of alcohol. Our authors show the correlation between high crime areas and the number of alcohol outlets. The less the number of alcohol outlets the less the crime rates for the area. So a reduction in places to purchase alcohol will lead to less violent crimes.The next major point discussed in the book is the restraining and punishment of street criminals. We learn of some disturbing facts about our criminal justice system in America. There is a correlation between crimes punished and crimes committed. The harsher the sentencing of convicted criminals the less crime is committed. Is this to say that punishment is a deterrent of crime? Yes it is. Yet, we see more and more criminals sentenced to parole and probation, which is viewed as a token punishment. A large percentage of these criminals go back into society and commit more crimes. The people who are given parole and probation are violent criminals who already have been convicted on numerous charges. Another fact about the prison inmates is that almost half of them are spending time for crimes they committed while on parole and probation. This is not to say that we should eliminate parole and probation all together. It would be too costly and many offenders do not recidivate while in these programs. Still some serious reforms need to be made. The problem with these programs is that they are too lenient. The average amount of money spent on a probationer is around $200. In addition, probation officers are not to blame for the problem because their caseloads are too much for anyone to handle. What our authors say we need to do is keep offenders in prison longer and devote more resources to the system for probation. We need a separate law enforcement agency to oversee probationers and keep them from committing future offenses. Our system today needs to be stricter and more confined to deter future offenses.The next main point is drug abuse and the correlation between drug abuse and crime. Our authors say that drug use is a catalyst to crime because it makes young men, young women, and even children morally irresponsible. (Bennett, 1996) For criminals, drugs cause their crimes to be more severe and easier to commit. Drugs add to the moral poverty in this country because they make every other social problem much worse. They increase child abuse, infant mortality, violent crime, prostitution, poverty, family disintegration, economic decay, and the spread of HIV. (Bennet, 1996) However, this problem with drugs is not unbeatable.

During the 1980 s drug use declined dramatically. During this time, more resources were spent to teach kids to Just say no. and it worked. With a more liberal government, things took place to change the downward spiral of drug abuse in this country. There was a change in opinion about how much of our national resources should go to drug education. There was an 80% drop in funding to The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). A more liberal government replaced the Reagan and Bush era with investigations into the legalization of drugs. Attorney General Janet Reno felt that drug crimes were treated to harshly with mandatory sentences complaining that too many drug dealers are in prison. The number of drug offense prosecutions dropped 12% in just two years. The number of ships and aircraft devoted to drug interdiction were slashed by 50%. In addition, legislation passed more lenient laws allowing trucks to enter this country from the southwest without inspection. Not a single pound of cocaine was confiscated from more than two million trucks that passed through the three busiest entry points along the southwest border where federal officials say most of the drug enters the country. (Bennet, 1996) To beat this problem, we need to look back and repeat some things we were doing simply because they worked. It is time to take back control of our country. We must take a strong position in the war against drugs. Our authors give us some ideas we need to do to stop the drug epidemic and thus reduce moral poverty. First, we must teach our children that drug use is bad. If we do not teach this, children will think that drug abuse is not bad and follow all those who were and now are addicts. Second, we must put open-air drug markets out of business. These markets open the door for addiction because they are always there ready to sell drugs. They also show that the community tolerates drug sales and use. Our government must also take action. They need to impose sanctions against foreign countries that provide drugs to our country. The longer the United States allows these countries to get away with this, the stronger they become and the harder it will be to stop them. The government also needs to make drug interdicting a top national security priority. We have one of the most powerful militaries in the world, if we get them out and about stopping drugs coming into the country it will cease. Even the most powerful drug lords are no match for the U.S. Military. Finally, we need to destroy the drug trafficking organizations inside our country. Our authors feel that the attorney general should be responsible for reporting on all known drug trafficking organizations and deploying federal enforcement personal to destroy their operations. Government could also impose a policy that would generate funds for federal drug enforcement agencies. All of the problems in our country come back to moral poverty. We need to strengthen our bonds with our children to become safe and respectable community. With the moral deterioration of our society come horrors that were unheard of fifty years ago. Today jails contain more people than ever and church enrollment is at an all time lowest. It is our duty to come back to religion and resolve any and all problems we have. Religion is our one defense against moral poverty. Our authors say the good needs constant reinforcement and the bad needs only permission. (Bennet, 1996) Such things like the legalization of abortion, has led us to believe that going against the moral fiber of our forefathers is OK. True religious faith enlarges the human heart; inspires us to revere and honor those things that are worthy things of our attention; reminds people of their basic responsibilities and commitments; provides society with are liable moral and social guardrails; helps the impulse of compassion take on the name of action; and allows the eyes of our heart to see our fellow citizens not merely as body count statistics or as enemies or aliens or other but as moral and spiritual beings, as children of God. (Bennet, 1996) References Bennet, Willian J. John J. DiIulio, and John P. Walters. Body Count: Moral Poverty and How to Win America s War Against Crime and Drugs. NY: Simon and Shuster, 1996.

FREE Essay on The Anti Drug Abuse Act of 1988

DirectEssays.com The Anti Drug Abuse Act of 1988

The death penalty has existed as long as humans have existed. The quote "an

eye for an eye" is found in the Bible. In the middle ages fines, public

humiliation and imprisonment were appropriate punishments for all crimes,

and death penalty for all murders. Today, Federal law states that the death

penalty is to be enforced with convicted criminals for: treason; deserting

armed forces during wartime; murder committed by a soldier; kidnapping and

murder that involves crossing state lines; murder committed during an airplane

hijacking; and of course, homicide. The death penalty is also called for

punishment of for: attempting to kill anyone investigating or prosecuting his or

her activities; advising, directing, authorizing or assisting in the murder of

someone. Also, The Anti-Drug abuse act of 1988 calls for the death penalty

for all drug related killings. Along with that, The bill amending sec. 848 to

controlled substances act calls for the death penalty or life imprisonment for

certain drug offences possession of 10 or more kg of heroin, cocaine,

phencyclidine or analogue. Added to that, The drug kingpin act sates the use

of death penalty for convicted major drug dealers caught with huge quantities

of drugs, over 66 lbs. of heroin and 330 lbs. of cocaine. Even though there

are these federal laws requiring the use of the death penalty for the crimes,

State laws only consider one crime, murder, to be a capital offense. In the

United States alone there have been 4047 executions since 1930, and 188

were from 1977-1996. In 1996, there were a total of 15,168,100 arrests;

33,050 for forcible rape; 1,506,200 involving drug violations and 19,020 for

murder and non-negligent manslaughter. The death penalty was enforced 45

times. The death penalty is an expensive punishment, since 1976 the united

states have spent 700 million dollars in it. Methods of the death penalty

Cliff Notes

Cliff Notes/Moral Poverty cliff notes 17515

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Legalization of Drugs: Against Essay

Legalization of Drugs: Against Essay

This essay has a total of 1690 words and 7 pages.

Legalization of Drugs: Against


Everyone agrees that something must be done about the tremendous physical
and emotional health problems that drug abuse causes. Concern about the abuse
of drugs is so widespread that recent polls indicate it to be one of the most
serious problems in today's world, threatening the security and freedom of whole
nations. Politicians, health experts and much of the general public feel that no
issue is more important than drug abuse. America's other pressing social
problems- disease, poverty, child abuse and neglect, and corruption- often have
a common element; that is drug abuse. The use of illegal drugs such as cocaine,
crack, heroin and marijuana cause extensive harm to the body and brain. Yet,
even after knowing this many people want illegal drugs to be legalized in every
aspect. The last thing we need is a policy that makes widely available
substances that impair memory, concentration and attention span; why in God's
name foster the uses of drugs that make you stupid? The campaign for drug
legalization is morally disgusting.The number of people who are addicted to
illegal drugs or are users of these drugs is quite shocking. Drug abuse is
clearly an injurious and sometimes fatal problem. The leaders of the
international economic summit in Paris in July 1989 concluded that the
devastating proportions of the drug problem calls for decisive action. On
September 5, 1989, President Bush called upon the United States to join in an
all-out fight against drugs. The United States Congress reports an estimated 25

to 30 million addicts of illegal drugs worldwide. Not all users are addicts, but
some of the 26 million regular users of illegal drugs in the United States are
addicted. Reports of child abuse to New York social services tripled between
1986 and 1988 and most of the cases involved drug abuse. Approximately 35
percent of the inmates of state prison were under the influence of illegal drugs
at the time they committed the crimes for which they are incarcerated. In some
parts of the country, that percentage is as high as 75 to 80! Another fact that
hits people hard is that out-right deaths from illegal drugs have quadrupled in
the last ten years! The proportion of 19 to 22 year olds who were at risk from
using illegal drugs rose from 44 percent in 1980 to 69 percent in 1987. Among
17-18 year olds the shift over the same interval was from 50 percent to 74
percent (Williams 226)! The abuse of illegal drugs is very threatening to
America's future. These drugs are the cause of many problems and crimes. Among
these many drug users exist some people who continue to resist drugs and have
been called the real heroes of the drug war (Hyde, 372). Although, drug abuse is
a serious and threatening problem today, it can be brought under control with
acceptable means.
The use of illegal drugs such as cocaine, crack, heroin and marijuana have
been proved to cause unbelievable damage and harm to the body and brain. As well
as we know, AIDS is a deadly disease which people are very frightened of today.
When parents bring a child into this world the main concern is that the child
be healthy. It is an impossible deed for a drug addict female to give birth to a

healthy child. Babies who are born with the AIDS virus should thank their
mothers who were drug addicts and brought them into this world to pay for their
own mistakes! According to Patrick Emmet, author of Drugs in America, when
cocaine is smoked, it is absorbed into the lungs and carried to the brain in
about 8 seconds (152). It depresses the breathing center in the brain and
increases the risk of death from heart failure or overdose. Doctors believe that
when a pregnant woman uses crack, the drug can trigger spasms in the blood
vessels of the fetus, restricting the supply of oxygen and nutrients, in turn
causing problems in development. When a pregnant woman takes large doses of
cocaine, the placenta may tear loose, killing the fetus and putting the mother's
life in danger. Even one use of crack can cause serious damage to fetus or to a
breast-fed baby. Heroin is another illegal drug that causes great harm and can
be life-taking too. When heroin is used it reaches the brain via the bloodstream
and is transformed into the depressant morphine. Heroin produces feelings of
euphoria, mental confusion and drowsiness. In addiction to many other effects on
the body, it depresses respiratory function (168). Thousands of heroin addicts
die from overdoses each year. Heroin users are also at great risk of getting
AIDS from the used of unclean needles. An estimated 60 percent of heroin addicts
in New York City carry the virus, and needle sharing among addicts represents a
major potential route for the spreading of the AIDS virus. According to a
National Research Council report in 1989, nearly 70 percent of the heterosexual
adults infected with the AIDS virus got the virus through an intravenous

Continues for 4 more pages >>

Essay on Alcohol and Drugs

Essay/Term paper: Legalization of drugs: against

Legalization of Drugs: Against


Everyone agrees that something must be done about the tremendous physical
and emotional health problems that drug abuse causes. Concern about the abuse
of drugs is so widespread that recent polls indicate it to be one of the most
serious problems in today's world, threatening the security and freedom of whole
nations. Politicians, health experts and much of the general public feel that no
issue is more important than drug abuse. America's other pressing social
problems- disease, poverty, child abuse and neglect, and corruption- often have
a common element; that is drug abuse. The use of illegal drugs such as cocaine,
crack, heroin and marijuana cause extensive harm to the body and brain. Yet,
even after knowing this many people want illegal drugs to be legalized in every
aspect. The last thing we need is a policy that makes widely available
substances that impair memory, concentration and attention span; why in God's
name foster the uses of drugs that make you stupid? The campaign for drug
legalization is morally disgusting.The number of people who are addicted to
illegal drugs or are users of these drugs is quite shocking. Drug abuse is
clearly an injurious and sometimes fatal problem. The leaders of the
international economic summit in Paris in July 1989 concluded that the
devastating proportions of the drug problem calls for decisive action. On
September 5, 1989, President Bush called upon the United States to join in an
all-out fight against drugs. The United States Congress reports an estimated 25
to 30 million addicts of illegal drugs worldwide. Not all users are addicts, but
some of the 26 million regular users of illegal drugs in the United States are
addicted. Reports of child abuse to New York social services tripled between
1986 and 1988 and most of the cases involved drug abuse. Approximately 35
percent of the inmates of state prison were under the influence of illegal drugs
at the time they committed the crimes for which they are incarcerated. In some
parts of the country, that percentage is as high as 75 to 80! Another fact that
hits people hard is that out-right deaths from illegal drugs have quadrupled in
the last ten years! The proportion of 19 to 22 year olds who were at risk from
using illegal drugs rose from 44 percent in 1980 to 69 percent in 1987. Among
17-18 year olds the shift over the same interval was from 50 percent to 74
percent (Williams 226)! The abuse of illegal drugs is very threatening to
America's future. These drugs are the cause of many problems and crimes. Among
these many drug users exist some people who continue to resist drugs and have
been called the real heroes of the drug war (Hyde, 372). Although, drug abuse is
a serious and threatening problem today, it can be brought under control with
acceptable means.
The use of illegal drugs such as cocaine, crack, heroin and marijuana have
been proved to cause unbelievable damage and harm to the body and brain. As well
as we know, AIDS is a deadly disease which people are very frightened of today.
When parents bring a child into this world the main concern is that the child
be healthy. It is an impossible deed for a drug addict female to give birth to a
healthy child. Babies who are born with the AIDS virus should thank their
mothers who were drug addicts and brought them into this world to pay for their
own mistakes! According to Patrick Emmet, author of Drugs in America, when
cocaine is smoked, it is absorbed into the lungs and carried to the brain in
about 8 seconds (152). It depresses the breathing center in the brain and
increases the risk of death from heart failure or overdose. Doctors believe that
when a pregnant woman uses crack, the drug can trigger spasms in the blood
vessels of the fetus, restricting the supply of oxygen and nutrients, in turn
causing problems in development. When a pregnant woman takes large doses of
cocaine, the placenta may tear loose, killing the fetus and putting the mother's
life in danger. Even one use of crack can cause serious damage to fetus or to a
breast-fed baby. Heroin is another illegal drug that causes great harm and can
be life-taking too. When heroin is used it reaches the brain via the bloodstream
and is transformed into the depressant morphine. Heroin produces feelings of
euphoria, mental confusion and drowsiness. In addiction to many other effects on
the body, it depresses respiratory function (168). Thousands of heroin addicts
die from overdoses each year. Heroin users are also at great risk of getting
AIDS from the used of unclean needles. An estimated 60 percent of heroin addicts
in New York City carry the virus, and needle sharing among addicts represents a
major potential route for the spreading of the AIDS virus. According to a
National Research Council report in 1989, nearly 70 percent of the heterosexual
adults infected with the AIDS virus got the virus through an intravenous
connection. The U.S. Public Health service predicted about a threefold increase
in the cumulative total of reported cases of AIDS among addicts between 1989 and
1991. When marijuana is smoked, about two thousand separate chemicals are
produced, and many of the chemicals do not readily pass through the body. Some
are stored in fatty tissues of the brain, lungs, and reproductive organs, where
they remain for a long time. In a book titled, Drug Policy and Intellectuals,
Stephen Thomas points out that one of the areas of great concern about the
effect of smoking marijuana is the changes in the reproductive system (156).
Heavy marijuana smoking reduces the level of testosterone, the principal male
hormone. It may delay sexual maturation in teenage boys and may possible reduce
sperm counts. The use of marijuana also has negative effects on the menstrual
cycle of females. Marijuana use during pregnancy increases the risk of death of
the fetus and of abnormal offspring. Some other effects of marijuana are
sedation, depression, hormone changes and brain damage. It is certain that the
smoking of marijuana leads to as much as a 50 percent short-term increase in
heart rate and a possible decrease in blood supply to the heart. It is crystal
clear that the use of these illegal drugs causes permanent and serious damage to
the body, brain and to innocent babies. Sometimes this deadly "sickness" stops
at distorting bodies and brains, but often goes to snatch the lives of their
users (Thomas 189).
Richard Williams explains in his book, Illegalizing Drugs, that the use of
illicit drugs causes the user to engage in violent acts. The need and craving of
these drugs forces the user to commit crimes such as robbery or murder. They
hurt themselves and innocent people usually become victims of such cases. These
drugs are addictive which may cause brain damage in the habitual user, and may
cause the user to engage in violence or self-destructive acts. Dealers arm
themselves with automatic weapons to protect themselves (124). Even the drug
abusers of the sixties had a slogan, Speed Kills. Young drug dealers have a good
supply of guns, and they do not hesitate to use them. The streets of many inner
cities are bloody battlegrounds where crack wars are fought. Bathrooms in
shelters for the homeless are transformed into part-time crack houses. Thomas
writes that crack pipes are hidden under mattresses next to the beds of people
who are only down on their luck (125). Last year one residential area in New
York, more than one hundred people were killed and most deaths were drug related.
The use of illicit drugs alters the brain's thinking, acting and responding
capacity, which results in violent and self-destructing acts. Innocent people
are injured or killed simply in order to continue the distribution and the use
of these isgusting and correctly illegal drugs (78).
After being altered with the effects of the use of illegal drugs on bodies,
brains, societies and nations, some people are brave enough to come forward and
campaign for the legalization of illicit drugs will reduce the number of addicts
and users, crime and deaths (Hyde 29). I disagree with this theory because that
is exactly what it is- a theory. Sure, we don't know what's going to happen in
the future, but we can use our statistics and be somewhat logical. If illegal
drugs were to be legalized, millions of Americans were to be enticed into
addiction by legalization. The pushers would cut prices, making more money than
ever from the ever-growing mass market. They would immediately increase the
potency and variety beyond anything available at any government-approved
narcotics counter. Crime would increase if these drugs were legalized. Crack
produces paranoid violence. More permissiveness equals more use equals more
violence. Alcohol which is now legal, but was once illegal is proof that after
legalizing it more alcohol-related crimes and car accidents have occurred.
Millions of people, including and increasing number of teenagers, are dependent
on what has been called the most dangerous drug on earth: alcohol. Dr. Stephen
Cohen writes in his book, The Alcoholism Problem, "The harm that comes from
Drug X (alcohol) is much greater than the harm from heroin from all respects"
(151). Why should we believe that the legalization of illegal drugs will reduce
the number of users of these drugs? Actually, it's quite logical these drugs
would be easily available if legalized, and the number of users will increase
because there won't be any breaking of laws that will end imprisonment. Illegal
drugs should be kept illegal to secure the lives of those who are not addicts.
The drug problem in our nation today is overwhelming, but can be controlled
by numerous strategies. Reducing the supply of foreign that are causing serious
problems in the Unites States is an important part on the war on drugs. Another
way the drug problem could be controlled is if drug dealers were punished more
severely. Whipping posts, the death penalty, and long jail sentences might be a
start. The following suggestions were made at a meeting at a meeting of the
Senate Committee Drugs and Crime held on April 4, 1989, to reduce the drug
problem: put more police on the streets, both to arrest drug dealers and to give
people a visible sense of hope; increase the number of prosecutors so that
arrests are meaningful: increase prison capacity, perhaps by using army bases
that are being phased out; increase drug education in schools; help the coast
guard interdiction; and learn more about drugs from health authorities. No
single strategy will win this war, but approach is aimed at preventing drug
abuse, treating and rehabilitating a

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