Essay for you

Squatter And The Don Essays On Poverty

Category: Essay

Description

Реферат: The Squatter And The Don Essay Research - Сайт рефератов, докладов, сочинений, дипломных и к

The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The novel begins with William Darrell explaining to his wife what makes him a settler and not a squatter in his eyes as an American citizen. From there Darrell heads to Southern California to acquire lands to settle build a homestead and bring his family down south with him. His wife makes him promise not to settle on lands belonging to others and that if he does pay the rightful owner of that land. Don Mariano Alamar was the man on whose land Mr. Darrell had squatted along with several other American settlers. About this time people were investing heavily in city blocks expecting a huge payoff when the Texas Pacific Railroad was punched through to San Diego. Mr. Darrell s son Clarence had fallen for Don Alamar s daughter Mercedes which began the love story in the novel. Mercita s mother was objectional to this since Clarence was of a squatters family so she sent Mercedes to New York to avoid Clarence. One problem- Clarence sought the Don s permission to follow her to New York in which he did. Corruption in the government was a revolving door regarding Don Alamar s land title. The Attorney General had dismissed the squatters appeal on Alamar s land only to have a subordinate attorney overturn the appeal so that it would remain in litigation longer. That soon came to an end as the Don s title was proven valid by the Attorney General again. The squatters didn t move off of the Alamar land with the news that the title was valid but did step up their killing of the Don s cattle. The other squatters had influenced Mr. Darrell to confront Don Mariano which led to a sickening rift between not only the Don and Darrell but between Darrell and Clarence as well as tearing Mercedes and Clarence apart. Clarence then left and traveled around the US Mexico South America and Europe. The failure of the Texas Pacific Railroad to come to San Diego broke Don Mariano economically and mentally. Don Mariano died of a heart not filled by expectations and a heart trampled on by the US government. Clarence returned to California and married Mercedes and offered to buy the Alamar ranch for a huge sum to lift the burden of the costs off of Dona Josefa s back. The Alamar family then moved and settled in San Francisco.

History has been taught to us in our up bringing as the told through the voices of wealthy white males. They in turn have created history books full of admiration towards the dominant white race as the saviors of all beings the reason we are what we are today. There is no mention of how the white capitalistic elitists used the backs of the minorities as a stepping stone to better their positions in society. This is where Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton steps in to tell a story that a society governed by race and class wouldn t necessarily be exposed to. As a woman born from Mexican-bloodlines Ruiz de Burton embodies everything about being apart of the previously mentioned minority that was used as a stepping stone. Being a minority allowed her to witness firsthand the atrocities that began to happen to the native Californios after the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago. The imperialistic dominant white culture was in no position to see what exactly they were doing to the natives other than sugar-coating their conquering and settlement to the world. Ruiz de Burton was able to write a novel that without bashing the white population was a thorough explanation of what happened as seen through the eyes of her people. It s as close to the real thing as we ll ever get. It s a voice that would have never been related to such a widespread audience if hadn t been written down. Perhaps this may have been a motivating factor in getting her work published. She told the story as a straight forward matter-of-fact chronicle of events.

The Squatter and the Don was written to appeal to a wide audience of people no matter their color class or ethnicity. Her intended audience wasn t solely to be that of her own racial ethnicity specifically because she spoke kindly of the people she must have abhorred the most. She didn t alienate one particular race but rather showed the underlying humanness of all be it good and genuine or evil and callus. By reaching out to everybody Ruiz de Burton is able to comfortably tell her story in a way in which everybody can pull in the information and understand how race and power have walked hand-in-hand in creating the problems that she s writing about. Ruiz de Burton is successful in bringing her points about for several reasons. First of all she doesn t try to make herself sound like a hero to end all of the problems by trying to incorporate plots to make wrongs into rights. This could have easily been done but by doing so it would have taken the focus off of what she was trying to accomplish in telling the plight of the native Californios. Also she s straight-forward and delivers to us an interesting blend of thoughts that make us realize what the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago actually brought forth upon the Californios population that wasn t white and the population that was white. The brutality and greed of the government to expand their territory is what stuck out the most though. It s well known that our government has long stepped on people on the way to their imperialistic-capalism laced grand society. Much is also known about how much injustice the government did to the Native American indigenous population but little known about how the US government handled the Mexicans. Ruiz de Burton showed through this novel many of the unjust and corrupt acts the US used to keep this population down and pose little threat to their interests. Eyes were opened to problems and actions never thought of or gained from US History textbooks. One final strength is that she used romance as a major theme of the book. A person that isn t interested in a romance novel quickly became interested in following the path of Clarence and Mercedes making the novel run smoothly and quickly.

This is a great book for anyone who isn t aware of the corruption in the government in dealing with aspects of Mexican-United States relations or how race and power created a constant power struggle and misunderstanding of one another. It provides a conquered viewpoint to the conquered and the conqueror.

Poem: Women Kinds Essay, Research Paper Since the beginning of it all From ways of mistreatment and weaker accusations Accusations leaving them without

Poem: Fading Away Essay, Research Paper as i gaze at the falling rain trying to get away from all the pain som uch tension rising in the air dying inside does anyone care

Romeo An Juliet Essay, Research Paper hi i need an essay about a character in romeo and juliet that demonsrtated maturity. in a well developed multi pagraph essay and say why you think the character’s maturity was greater than the other characters in the play.

Many Waters Essay, Research Paper This book is about two boy brothers who went in too there mom’s lab because she was a scientist and she had exmaraments in the room.

English Comparison Essay Essay, Research Paper Traditional bush stories have always been a part of Australia’s history; involving many types of characters like Drovers and Shearers, just to name a couple.

Ploace Of Peace Essay, Research Paper Beyond the trees, far from the sky Is a place where life goes by, Without a sniffle,tear,or lie. A place of ease, a place of peace.

Oh Really? Essay, Research Paper Oh Really, you think i am a lark, the dogs they run and bark, but when i say to them, shut up shut up shut up, you say to be nice to them,

ROTC Entrence Essay Essay, Research Paper entrance essay For almost as long as I cn remember, I have been interested in th military. Influenced by such movies as “Patton”, and by my dad’s interest in military history, my

Poem: Oklahoma Bombing Essay, Research Paper Why do people do it? The victims are all innocent! It isn’t their fault that they were there that fated moment.

Summertime Essay, Research Paper ?Summertime? Summer is here and the sun is bright, I can stay out late and party all night. Hanging out with friends is what I like,

Shane Essay, Research Paper Sometimes, I need you more than I need air And sometimes I miss you more than I will forever, never forget the times that we have shaared. The are priceless

Poem: Belong Essay, Research Paper Where I belong I am weak, I am strong I will fit where I belong don’t know where it is for now but it will come, if I allow tomorrow, I start a brand new day

Him Essay, Research Paper I think about him day and night The though won’t go away And, oh, how I would hold him tight every second of the day He is perfect, that is true, not an average me or you

The Peruvian Society Essay, Research Paper THE PERUVIAN SOCIETY Much to my surprise, the Peruvian society consists of a distinct and diverse culture, one, which would not be envisioned for the current twenty-first century. It is a society in which I, as an American, look at as unusual and peculiar. This course has opened my eyes to something way beyond my comprehension of a society living today.

Cliche Poem Essay, Research Paper You took the words right out of my mouth… Every dog has his day. When the going gets tough, the tough get going Say nothing,

Beautiful Stranger Essay, Research Paper BEAUTIFUL STRANGER Sadly, I must admit, I don’t know much about you. But, you seem so very special- So different from what I’m used to.

Poem: She Sat Essay, Research Paper She sat… helpless in her room praying to whatever god there may be to let her call to him. could god ignore such a painful cry?

Squatter Essay, Research Paper Rohinton Mistry is known as a post-colonial writer. His writings reflect the Indian diaspora – the splitting of identity. On the one hand, his characters dream of being integrated into, and accepted by, Canadian society. On the other hand, these same characters are torn my an insatiable desire to be true to their native culture, to honour and cherish their own, distinct cultural identity.

Poem: Gone Forever Essay, Research Paper Gone Forever One of these days I’ll see you again, You may be gone Far to heaven, I remember the times We ran to play,

School Essay, Research Paper School! Where did they come up with that name? I guess because it rhymes with lame Now this rhyme you read will be quite corny Please don’t get upset, mad, or horny

When the northern and middle colonies were founded, England had a strong hold over the colonies. They controlled development and the government, among other things. But as the colonies developed, they began to have an ever-growing sense of independence that was a threat to its English rulers. As a result of this England went through much trouble in constantly trying to regain full control of the colonies.

Darwin Research Essay, Research Paper Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. He was the son of Robert Waring Darwin and his wife Susannah; and the grandson of the scientist Erasmus Darwin, and

Miller Spring Essay Essay, Research Paper Miller Springs Essay My science class and I went to Miller Springs to learn about sediments and nature a few days ago. The good and bad sides of the trip I will explain below.

Scholarship Essay Essay, Research Paper No greater contribution can be made to a specific field than research that leads to the development of a new and superior technology. Universities and businesses constantly attempt to remain on the cutting edge of new design, manufacturing, and application systems through research and development.

Ode To Boys Essay, Research Paper We like them But do they like us The ones we do never fuss They don’t stop in And we wonder why We stress, we bitch We sometimes cry

Crying Again Essay, Research Paper The Sky is crying again And i am crying again. When did it start? When will it end? How’d i wind up with out a friend? Tears from my heart cling to my soul.

Life Is Like Essay, Research Paper Life is like a car. When it?s new, it usually works all right. As time drives by, it breaks down and needs repairs. Life is like a leaf. In its youth, it

Hell Day Essay, Research Paper Hell day is a fun day where everything is like a burn day. If you would listen you could learn about this day and be apart of this day. If you are wise then you will relize that hell day is satans Birthday.

Dare Essay Essay, Research Paper What D.A.R.E Means To Me Dare has prepared me to say no to drugs in eight different ways. If anyone asks me to do drugs I will know what to do, such as- just ignoring the person or just

The Playground Essay, Research Paper I have a friend I used to know who had a playground where we would go The times we had are fresh in my mind but they are from another time

Squatters In Nyc Essay, Research Paper The Hidden Homeless Have you ever dreamed of living in a house for free? You wouldn t have to pay the rent, and have yourself a roof over your head, and have more money to spend on things you would otherwise have to spend for a tiny piece of apartment. Think of it this way: isn t housing a right for everyone? As prices soar, the chances of finding affordable housing and low rents in NYC is nearly impossible and housing projects are rapidly getting filled up.

Survey Essay, Research Paper We invite you to participate in a brief web-based survey so that we can understand your interests and needs regarding current and

Bridges Essay, Research Paper Bridges are crossed daily, Some more often then other, Live consist of bridges, Some more stable than other, And if you fall off,

Research Paper How To Writing A Research Essay The toughest part of the essay, for me, was taking all the information I had gained and reduce it to a mere few pages essay. After all, quality is better

Christmas Essay, Research Paper Christmas Christmas Christmas is all about praising God and having fun times with each other. It’s not about gifts and food. It’s about having fun because the more fun

Other articles

The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The Squatter And The Don Essay, Research Paper

The novel begins with William Darrell explaining to his wife what makes him a settler and not a squatter, in his eyes, as an American citizen. From there Darrell heads to Southern California to acquire lands to settle. build a homestead, and bring his family down south with him. His wife makes him promise not to settle on lands belonging to others and that if he does, pay the rightful owner of that land. Don Mariano Alamar was the man on whose land Mr. Darrell had squatted, along with several other American settlers. About this time people were investing heavily in city blocks expecting a huge payoff when the Texas Pacific Railroad was punched through to San Diego. Mr. Darrell s son Clarence had fallen for Don Alamar s daughter, Mercedes, which began the love story in the novel. Mercita s mother was objectional to this since Clarence was of a squatters family, so she sent Mercedes to New York to avoid Clarence. One problem- Clarence sought the Don s permission to follow her to New York, in which he did. Corruption in the government was a revolving door regarding Don Alamar s land title. The Attorney General had dismissed the squatters appeal on Alamar s land, only to have a subordinate attorney overturn the appeal so that it would remain in litigation longer. That soon came to an end as the Don s title was proven valid by the Attorney General again. The squatters didn t move off of the Alamar land with the news that the title was valid, but did step up their killing of the Don s cattle. The other squatters had influenced Mr. Darrell to confront Don Mariano which led to a sickening rift between not only the Don and Darrell, but between Darrell and Clarence, as well as tearing Mercedes and Clarence apart. Clarence then left and traveled around the US, Mexico, South America, and Europe. The failure of the Texas Pacific Railroad to come to San Diego broke Don Mariano economically and mentally. Don Mariano died of a heart not filled by expectations and a heart trampled on by the US government. Clarence returned to California and married Mercedes and offered to buy the Alamar ranch for a huge sum to lift the burden of the costs off of Dona Josefa s back. The Alamar family then moved and settled in San Francisco.

History has been taught to us in our up bringing as the told through the voices of wealthy white males. They in turn have created history books full of admiration towards the dominant white race, as the saviors of all beings, the reason we are what we are today. There is no mention of how the white capitalistic elitists used the backs of the minorities as a stepping stone to better their positions in society. This is where Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton steps in to tell a story that a society governed by race and class wouldn t necessarily be exposed to. As a woman born from Mexican-bloodlines, Ruiz de Burton embodies everything about being apart of the previously mentioned minority that was used as a stepping stone. Being a minority allowed her to witness firsthand the atrocities that began to happen to the native Californios after the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago. The imperialistic dominant white culture was in no position to see what exactly they were doing to the natives, other than sugar-coating their conquering and settlement to the world. Ruiz de Burton was able to write a novel that, without bashing the white population, was a thorough explanation of what happened, as seen through the eyes of her people. It s as close to the real thing as we ll ever get. It s a voice that would have never been related to such a widespread audience if hadn t been written down. Perhaps this may have been a motivating factor in getting her work published. She told the story as a straight forward, matter-of-fact chronicle of events.

The Squatter and the Don was written to appeal to a wide audience of people, no matter their color, class, or ethnicity. Her intended audience wasn t solely to be that of her own racial ethnicity, specifically because she spoke kindly of the people she must have abhorred the most. She didn t alienate one particular race, but rather showed the underlying humanness of all, be it good and genuine or evil and callus. By reaching out to everybody, Ruiz de Burton is able to comfortably tell her story in a way in which everybody can pull in the information and understand how race and power have walked hand-in-hand in creating the problems that she s writing about. Ruiz de Burton is successful in bringing her points about for several reasons. First of all, she doesn t try to make herself sound like a hero to end all of the problems by trying to incorporate plots to make wrongs into rights. This could have easily been done, but by doing so it would have taken the focus off of what she was trying to accomplish in telling the plight of the native Californios. Also, she s straight-forward and delivers to us an interesting blend of thoughts that make us realize what the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago actually brought forth upon the Californios population that wasn t white, and the population that was white. The brutality and greed of the government to expand their territory is what stuck out the most though. It s well known that our government has long stepped on people on the way to their imperialistic-capalism laced grand society. Much is also known about how much injustice the government did to the Native American indigenous population, but little known about how the US government handled the Mexicans. Ruiz de Burton showed through this novel many of the unjust and corrupt acts the US used to keep this population down and pose little threat to their interests. Eyes were opened to problems and actions never thought of or gained from US History textbooks. One final strength is that she used romance as a major theme of the book. A person that isn t interested in a romance novel, quickly became interested in following the path of Clarence and Mercedes, making the novel run smoothly and quickly.

This is a great book for anyone who isn t aware of the corruption in the government in dealing with aspects of Mexican-United States relations, or how race and power created a constant power struggle and misunderstanding of one another. It provides a conquered viewpoint to the conquered and the conqueror.

The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The Squatter And The Don Essay, Research Paper

The novel begins with William Darrell explaining to his wife what makes him a settler and not a squatter, in his eyes, as an American citizen. From there Darrell heads to Southern California to acquire lands to settle. build a homestead, and bring his family down south with him. His wife makes him promise not to settle on lands belonging to others and that if he does, pay the rightful owner of that land. Don Mariano Alamar was the man on whose land Mr. Darrell had squatted, along with several other American settlers. About this time people were investing heavily in city blocks expecting a huge payoff when the Texas Pacific Railroad was punched through to San Diego. Mr. Darrell s son Clarence had fallen for Don Alamar s daughter, Mercedes, which began the love story in the novel. Mercita s mother was objectional to this since Clarence was of a squatters family, so she sent Mercedes to New York to avoid Clarence. One problem- Clarence sought the Don s permission to follow her to New York, in which he did. Corruption in the government was a revolving door regarding Don Alamar s land title. The Attorney General had dismissed the squatters appeal on Alamar s land, only to have a subordinate attorney overturn the appeal so that it would remain in litigation longer. That soon came to an end as the Don s title was proven valid by the Attorney General again. The squatters didn t move off of the Alamar land with the news that the title was valid, but did step up their killing of the Don s cattle. The other squatters had influenced Mr. Darrell to confront Don Mariano which led to a sickening rift between not only the Don and Darrell, but between Darrell and Clarence, as well as tearing Mercedes and Clarence apart. Clarence then left and traveled around the US, Mexico, South America, and Europe. The failure of the Texas Pacific Railroad to come to San Diego broke Don Mariano economically and mentally. Don Mariano died of a heart not filled by expectations and a heart trampled on by the US government. Clarence returned to California and married Mercedes and offered to buy the Alamar ranch for a huge sum to lift the burden of the costs off of Dona Josefa s back. The Alamar family then moved and settled in San Francisco.

History has been taught to us in our up bringing as the told through the voices of wealthy white males. They in turn have created history books full of admiration towards the dominant white race, as the saviors of all beings, the reason we are what we are today. There is no mention of how the white capitalistic elitists used the backs of the minorities as a stepping stone to better their positions in society. This is where Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton steps in to tell a story that a society governed by race and class wouldn t necessarily be exposed to. As a woman born from Mexican-bloodlines, Ruiz de Burton embodies everything about being apart of the previously mentioned minority that was used as a stepping stone. Being a minority allowed her to witness firsthand the atrocities that began to happen to the native Californios after the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago. The imperia

listic dominant white culture was in no position to see what exactly they were doing to the natives, other than sugar-coating their conquering and settlement to the world. Ruiz de Burton was able to write a novel that, without bashing the white population, was a thorough explanation of what happened, as seen through the eyes of her people. It s as close to the real thing as we ll ever get. It s a voice that would have never been related to such a widespread audience if hadn t been written down. Perhaps this may have been a motivating factor in getting her work published. She told the story as a straight forward, matter-of-fact chronicle of events.

The Squatter and the Don was written to appeal to a wide audience of people, no matter their color, class, or ethnicity. Her intended audience wasn t solely to be that of her own racial ethnicity, specifically because she spoke kindly of the people she must have abhorred the most. She didn t alienate one particular race, but rather showed the underlying humanness of all, be it good and genuine or evil and callus. By reaching out to everybody, Ruiz de Burton is able to comfortably tell her story in a way in which everybody can pull in the information and understand how race and power have walked hand-in-hand in creating the problems that she s writing about. Ruiz de Burton is successful in bringing her points about for several reasons. First of all, she doesn t try to make herself sound like a hero to end all of the problems by trying to incorporate plots to make wrongs into rights. This could have easily been done, but by doing so it would have taken the focus off of what she was trying to accomplish in telling the plight of the native Californios. Also, she s straight-forward and delivers to us an interesting blend of thoughts that make us realize what the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago actually brought forth upon the Californios population that wasn t white, and the population that was white. The brutality and greed of the government to expand their territory is what stuck out the most though. It s well known that our government has long stepped on people on the way to their imperialistic-capalism laced grand society. Much is also known about how much injustice the government did to the Native American indigenous population, but little known about how the US government handled the Mexicans. Ruiz de Burton showed through this novel many of the unjust and corrupt acts the US used to keep this population down and pose little threat to their interests. Eyes were opened to problems and actions never thought of or gained from US History textbooks. One final strength is that she used romance as a major theme of the book. A person that isn t interested in a romance novel, quickly became interested in following the path of Clarence and Mercedes, making the novel run smoothly and quickly.

This is a great book for anyone who isn t aware of the corruption in the government in dealing with aspects of Mexican-United States relations, or how race and power created a constant power struggle and misunderstanding of one another. It provides a conquered viewpoint to the conquered and the conqueror.

Project MUSE - Writing against Wilderness: María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s Elite Environmental Justice

General view of Rancho de los Peñasquitos, a drawing from History of San Diego County, California, published in 1883. Courtesy the Library of Congress. [inline-graphic 01] This rancho of more than 8,000 acres belonged to Ruiz de Burton’s great-uncle, Francisco Ruiz. It was the first Mexican land grant in California.

“The water is in the sea now, for there we let it go every year; but if we were sensible, judicious men, we would not let it go to waste—we would save it” (54). Negotiating with the uncivilized squatters determined to usurp his land and kill his cattle, Don Mariano Alamar, the eponymous hero of María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s novel The Squatter and the Don (1885). addresses readers as a model citizen: forward-thinking, generous, and—unlike his interlocutors—judicious. The author, I will argue, deploys Don Mariano as a paradigmatic, “civilized” figure in an argument for environmental justice for Mexican Americans in early California, simultaneously attempting, via her avatar’s virtuoso rhetorical appeals to logic, emotion, and ethics, to enlist to her cause readers constructed as progressive and elite. At the same time, the hero’s class-inflected politics demonstrate her project’s internal contradictions, which epitomize for today’s readers some central challenges facing projects for social and environmental amelioration.

In America’s earlier “Wests,” which included both Appalachian slopes and Michigan forests, indigenous nations resisted US federal forces advancing white settlers’ colonial incursions. Removal itself, because of whites’ land appropriation and Native Americans’ placement on land construed as worthless or waste, represents a form of environmental injustice. Such removal was enabled by continuing conceptions of Indians as savage, connected with both animals and nature, in contrast to Euroamericans’ supposedly civilized culture (Pearce 200ff. ; 229ff.). From Bret Harte and Joaquin Miller to Sarah Winnemucca and Ora Eddleman Reed, writers of the Far West proposed further permutations of those concepts, variously celebrating and correcting eastern representations of their region, its “nature,” and its “natives.” As Ian Frederick Finseth emphasizes in another context, “In talking about race or nature, … we are always talking, at some level, about the other” (2). Ruiz de Burton’s account of civilized Mexican Americans’ conflicts with federal and state governments, and their displacement from traditional lands, parallels and diverges from prior clashes between Native Americans and federal forces. At the heart of those conflicts were radically different understandings of individuals’ and communities’ relationships to land. In the [End Page 361] West, Native Americans’ and Euroamericans’ views not only diverged from each other, they split from those of Mexican Americans; and even internal class disparities within each group shaped the region’s resource wars for grass, minerals, and water. 1

Through a case study of The Squatter and the Don and some of its concrete contexts, this essay extends backward and complicates our understanding of environmental justice. 2 The contemporary environmental justice movement represents a complex “confluence of three of America’s greatest challenges: the struggle against racism and poverty; the effort to preserve and improve the environment; and the compelling need to shift social institutions from class division and environmental depletion to social unity and global sustainability.” 3 In the last decade, there has been significant progress for communities “most negatively impacted by interrelated dynamics of institutionalized racism, the commodification of land, water, energy and air, unresponsive and unaccountable governmental policies and regulation, and the lack of resources and power to engage in decision-making about issues that most impact them” (Matsuoka 1 ). 4 Reading Ruiz de Burton’s novel The Squatter and the Don suggests that we need to think about environmental justice more expansively. 5 In particular, we need to assess internal fractures in “communities,” which can themselves encompass conflicting constituencies. The author’s appeals to elite readers offer unique opportunities for assessing such fractures, partly because of the disjunctions between her imagined readers and twenty-first-century audiences.

In addressing this subject, I am attempting to bridge the gap that Charles Waugh has identified between “ecocritics.

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.

Реферат: The Squatter And The Don Essay Research

The Squatter And The Don Essay, Research Paper

The novel begins with William Darrell explaining to his wife what makes him a settler and not a squatter, in his eyes, as an American citizen. From there Darrell heads to Southern California to acquire lands to settle. build a homestead, and bring his family down south with him. His wife makes him promise not to settle on lands belonging to others and that if he does, pay the rightful owner of that land. Don Mariano Alamar was the man on whose land Mr. Darrell had squatted, along with several other American settlers. About this time people were investing heavily in city blocks expecting a huge payoff when the Texas Pacific Railroad was punched through to San Diego. Mr. Darrell s son Clarence had fallen for Don Alamar s daughter, Mercedes, which began the love story in the novel. Mercita s mother was objectional to this since Clarence was of a squatters family, so she sent Mercedes to New York to avoid Clarence. One problem- Clarence sought the Don s permission to follow her to New York, in which he did. Corruption in the government was a revolving door regarding Don Alamar s land title. The Attorney General had dismissed the squatters appeal on Alamar s land, only to have a subordinate attorney overturn the appeal so that it would remain in litigation longer. That soon came to an end as the Don s title was proven valid by the Attorney General again. The squatters didn t move off of the Alamar land with the news that the title was valid, but did step up their killing of the Don s cattle. The other squatters had influenced Mr. Darrell to confront Don Mariano which led to a sickening rift between not only the Don and Darrell, but between Darrell and Clarence, as well as tearing Mercedes and Clarence apart. Clarence then left and traveled around the US, Mexico, South America, and Europe. The failure of the Texas Pacific Railroad to come to San Diego broke Don Mariano economically and mentally. Don Mariano died of a heart not filled by expectations and a heart trampled on by the US government. Clarence returned to California and married Mercedes and offered to buy the Alamar ranch for a huge sum to lift the burden of the costs off of Dona Josefa s back. The Alamar family then moved and settled in San Francisco.

History has been taught to us in our up bringing as the told through the voices of wealthy white males. They in turn have created history books full of admiration towards the dominant white race, as the saviors of all beings, the reason we are what we are today. There is no mention of how the white capitalistic elitists used the backs of the minorities as a stepping stone to better their positions in society. This is where Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton steps in to tell a story that a society governed by race and class wouldn t necessarily be exposed to. As a woman born from Mexican-bloodlines, Ruiz de Burton embodies everything about being apart of the previously mentioned minority that was used as a stepping stone. Being a minority allowed her to witness firsthand the atrocities that began to happen to the native Californios after the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago. The imperialistic dominant white culture was in no position to see what exactly they were doing to the natives, other than sugar-coating their conquering and settlement to the world. Ruiz de Burton was able to write a novel that, without bashing the white population, was a thorough explanation of what happened, as seen through the eyes of her people. It s as close to the real thing as we ll ever get. It s a voice that would have never been related to such a widespread audience if hadn t been written down. Perhaps this may have been a motivating factor in getting her work published. She told the story as a straight forward, matter-of-fact chronicle of events.

The Squatter and the Don was written to appeal to a wide audience of people, no matter their color, class, or ethnicity. Her intended audience wasn t solely to be that of her own racial ethnicity, specifically because she spoke kindly of the people she must have abhorred the most. She didn t alienate one particular race, but rather showed the underlying humanness of all, be it good and genuine or evil and callus. By reaching out to everybody, Ruiz de Burton is able to comfortably tell her story in a way in which everybody can pull in the information and understand how race and power have walked hand-in-hand in creating the problems that she s writing about. Ruiz de Burton is successful in bringing her points about for several reasons. First of all, she doesn t try to make herself sound like a hero to end all of the problems by trying to incorporate plots to make wrongs into rights. This could have easily been done, but by doing so it would have taken the focus off of what she was trying to accomplish in telling the plight of the native Californios. Also, she s straight-forward and delivers to us an interesting blend of thoughts that make us realize what the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hildago actually brought forth upon the Californios population that wasn t white, and the population that was white. The brutality and greed of the government to expand their territory is what stuck out the most though. It s well known that our government has long stepped on people on the way to their imperialistic-capalism laced grand society. Much is also known about how much injustice the government did to the Native American indigenous population, but little known about how the US government handled the Mexicans. Ruiz de Burton showed through this novel many of the unjust and corrupt acts the US used to keep this population down and pose little threat to their interests. Eyes were opened to problems and actions never thought of or gained from US History textbooks. One final strength is that she used romance as a major theme of the book. A person that isn t interested in a romance novel, quickly became interested in following the path of Clarence and Mercedes, making the novel run smoothly and quickly.

This is a great book for anyone who isn t aware of the corruption in the government in dealing with aspects of Mexican-United States relations, or how race and power created a constant power struggle and misunderstanding of one another. It provides a conquered viewpoint to the conquered and the conqueror.

Squatter and the Don and an Old Women Remember Analysis - by Mtomic1

Squatter and the Don and an Old Women Remember Analysis

Below is a free excerpt of "Squatter and the Don and an Old Women Remember Analysis" from Anti Essays, your source for free research papers, essays, and term paper examples.

Milan Tomic
Latin American Lit
Professor Owens
22 Oct 2014

It is interesting to see the development of an identity for Latin American Literature as we read stories that truly start from the beginning of the settling of the Americas. Two stories that stand out to me are "An Old Women Remembers" and "The Squatter And The Don" in which they share a common theme of pride and empowerment of women, something rarely seen from writings in this era.
Based on what we know of the times when both pieces were written, it is safe to say that the role expected of women is that of housekeeper, cook, and bearer of children. This notion at the time was probably the general consensus of about ninety nine percent of the male population, yet in both stories we see female characters with a very strong sense of pride and identity of their own.
On the surface of Eulalia Perez's memoire "An Old Women Remembers" one would think that she is simply a women who fits the mold of the roles of women during that time. Yet we see time and time again that she has a strong sense of pride, regardless of what task she does, that she will be the best at the task at hand. This sense in pride is demonstrated when she's given the task of teaching two Native Americans to cook and she states " I taught them so well that I had the satisfaction of seeing them turn out to be very good cooks, perhaps the best in all this part of the country" (75). Perez makes it a point to make sure the reader understands that though she was just a cook, she was the best cook, and all those under her became the best too.
We see Perez progress through the story constantly earning more responsibilities and higher positions in her social structure due to her always being the best at what she does. Numerous times in the story, whenever she is given a new responsibility or other duties, she makes sure to let it be known that it was difficult and important, and that she executed them perfectly. She.

Squatters - Essays - 1878 Words

Squatters

The phenomenon of urban slums in Metro Manila was not widely documented until the 1960’s, when the Philippines experienced rapid urbanization and astounding influx of squatters population. Earlier in the 60’s, the squatter population started to swell along with the accelerated urbanization. Rural migrants streamed in from the largely agricultural countryside, lured by promises of jobs and wealth. They found themselves landless and eventually settled near swamp land and creeks, on idle government properties like the Tondo Foreshore Area, which are now a large squatter colony.

An estimate made in 1999, suggest theat 16 million urban dwellers are living in slums and squatters settlement in the Philippines. Manila along with the most cities in developing world has an enormous squatters population, increasing at rate of 12 percent each year.

The most populated squatter are in the northwest portion of the city

within the political jurisdiction of the Tondo District. The Foreshore area

of 137 hectares has been reclaimed from the Manila Bay in 1940’s as part

of the government plan of industrialization and port development. After

World ll, this area became the target of rural migrants all over the country

who were in need of employment and recovery from the ravages of war.

In Metro Manila, squatting eskwater in Tagalog is major issue in

Filipino society. Squatting was started in World War ll, as people built

Makeshift houses called Barong-Barong in abandoned private property

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

The statements of the problem are the following questions to be answered:

1. Is there a culture of squatters in C.M recto avenue?

2. What is the relation of the said culture to the squatters’ success?failure in life?

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY

The research study was conducted in order for the student researcher to have in-depth knowledge of the culture of squatters in C.M recto, avenue. And in the acquisition of such know-how, a full understanding of the relation of the said culture for the squatter to attain success/failure in life.

DEFINITION OF TERMS

For clear understanding of the discussion, the following terms are defined:

1. Culture – the customs, beliefs, social forms and material traits of a racial, religious and social group

2. Industrialized – to devote to industry.

3. Migrants – persons who moves regularly in order to find work

4. Phenomenon – a rare or significant fact or event.

5. Poverty – failure to fulfil needs essential to social functioning. These needs are education, housing, nutrition and security.

6. Settlement – an institution providing various community services especially to a large city population

7. Slums – a densely populated urban that are marked by overcrowding, dirty run-down housing, poverty and.

Please sign up to read full document.

illegally residing in an unoccupied land. They go to cities in search of fortune, but they end up in squatter communities. These communities have become one of the most observable characteristics of urban areas in the Philippines. II. Squatting, Squatter Settlements and Squatters Squatting is defined as “occupying an abandoned or unoccupied space or building, usually residential, that the squatter does not own, rent or otherwise.

4481 Words | 12 Pages

Housing Policy Assignment NAME: KIMOSOP KEMBOI ANTHONY EXPLANATION OF THE TERMS A. Squatter Settlement and Homelessness The term squatter is defined is obtained from squat which means to live, build on, utilize, a property of a person without his concern and his approval or without any document of ownership like allotment letter, lease letter or the Title Deed. Dictionary.com defines a squatter as a person who settles on land or occupies.

1420 Words | 4 Pages

our shack that has one room a fireplace up one end and a living area up the other. I need to unpack our supplies and I would like to start the vegetable garden. I think I will shoot a rabbit for our tea. http://fineartamerica.com/images-medium/squatters -shack-pamela-l-phelps.jpg DAY 3 Today, I am bringing the sheep back from my neighbour. I cannot afford to employ any helpers at the moment but I have met an aboriginal tracker who will assist me in watching the animals.

762 Words | 3 Pages

Imagine leaving your homeland and traveling somewhere far and foreign where you are forced to adopt a new culture, traditions, and live up to the diverse social expectations. You would feel lost, isolated and alone. In the short story "Squatter ", Rohiston Mistry presents details on a character's struggle to find his identity in a westernized Canada, while explaining the dilemmas he encountered during the time of integration and adoption. Mistry also portrays the influences of.

334 Words | 1 Pages

social impacts of Squatter Settlements? Squatting is an issue that has been plaguing Jamaica for years and with the necessary law and procedures implemented, we have grown to seeing this issue steering back at us. Taylor (2012) claimed that squatter settlements encourage theft of public service and nonstandard behaviour, which is evident of the numerous thefts of electricity and water supply in these squatting areas. In addition to that it was also argued that.

362 Words | 2 Pages

Squatter by Rohinton Mistry is a short story depicting the challenges faced by immigrants in foreign countries. He is very clever in trying to get the message of this story across. Mr.Mistry shows the issues faced by immigrants in a humorous yet attention-grabbing manner. For example, Sarosh’s difficulty in adapting to the toilet is a sarcastic way of showing some issues faced by immigrants. Sarosh was so used to squatting he could not adapt to toilets. This clearly shows that.

511 Words | 2 Pages