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In The Beginning Was The Word Essay

In The Beginning Was The Word Essay, Research Paper

In the beginning was the wordIf Scott Rudin wasn’t a millionaire Hollywood producer, it might be possible to feel a little sorry for him right now. Because Rudin has engineered a couple of years of headaches and resentment for himself which, recent history suggests, will end up in an unsatisfactory outcome. First, he found a director (Stephen Daldry) and a writer (David Hare) to adapt Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections, the film rights to which he optioned personally before the book was published. Then, last week, he got together with New Line to produce the film version of Dave Eggers’s A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius. So far, so good. But The Corrections will be hard work to adapt. (It is interesting that Rudin has called in Brits to tackle the current contender for the Great American Novel.) A Heartbreaking Work… will be almost impossible, which is why, despite the film rights going for a hefty $2 million, the project had been sitting around at New Line for a year before Rudin showed an interest. The lure and the curse of these books lie with their readers. It’s the struggle going on right now to get filmgoers interested in The Shipping News: the obvious audience, the people who have read E. Annie Proulx’s novel, are the most sceptical. You can tempt them with the Newfoundland scenery and a heavyweight cast but they are wary. The Corrections will have the same battle. When Rudin bought the rights, the most he could expect was another well-reviewed, little-read literary novel. But it turned into something else and joined books such as The Shipping News, Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow, Snow Falling on Cedars, Birdsong, The Secret History and Captain Corelli’s Mandolin in that elusive category: the big bourgeois hit. There seems to be one every season. Books which everyone you know suddenly seems to be reading. Books you get given several times as presents. They are all novels that seem clever enough to be respectable yet suit people who don’t have time to read that much fiction, and they work for various generations and both genders. Often they are books that appear from nowhere and achieve a fame that eclipses everything else the author has written; on the poster for the film version of Sebastian Faulks’s Charlotte Gray, there’s a bright red circle telling us that it is ‘by the author of Birdsong ‘. In theory, those readers should provide a core audience for the film version. That should be part of the advantage of adapting a bestselling book, and it worked for Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Lord of the Rings and Bridget Jones’s Diary. You don’t spend $57m on a Captain Corelli without hoping that there is a large group of people who want to see it. But it didn’t work for Corelli – or for Snow Falling on Cedars and Smilla. (’Have they made a film of Snow Falling on Cedars?’ I was asked a couple of times while working on this article.) And it hasn’t worked for The Shipping News which has struggled at the US box office. It’s not a bad film but it’s not a particularly good one either. It is as forgettable as E. Annie Proulx’s novel is memorable. It lacks strangeness: director Lasse Hallström has found no cinematic answer to Proulx’s sparse prose and unsettling sense of place, and he has got close to admitting as much. ‘Annie so boldly uses everything she knows about the island, piecing it together like a collage, a mix of poetry and trivia, comedy and drama, the lyrical images, the tapestry of disparate elements. The challenge to capture the atmosphere of the novel for the screen was a somewhat crazy idea. I’m very happy that I was able to try.’ Proulx’s ugly, hulking central character doesn’t sound like any known leading man, certainly not John Travolta who was originally pencilled in for the role. But although Travolta would almost certainly have been a disaster, the eventual cast of Kevin Spacey, Julianne Moore, Judi Dench, Pete Postlethwaite and Cate Blanchett has a bullying aura of Quality Cinema to it. Hallström, too, has a track record with this kind of project, having made The Shipping News straight after Chocolat and The Cider House Rules. When it comes to Hollywood and contemporary literature, the same names keep cropping up – Rudin produced Wonder Boys (not to mention Iris and Angela’s Ashes); Miramax made the three Hallström films and were involved with Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. The English Patient and All The Pretty Horses (another flop). And then there’s Steven Spielberg (The Color Purple, Empire Of The Sun, Schindler’s List). The Color Purple and The English Patient are the interesting ones here. Alice Walker’s novel was a classic word-of-mouth success. There were issues of race and sexuality, it was told in the form of letters and in this country it came in a distinctly unglossy Women’s Press edition. People felt righteous reading it. Steven Spielberg probably did too, which might explain why he chose to make the film that was going to transform him from that shark-and-aliens guy into a serious director. The strange thing was that, while Spielberg got attacked by gay and black pressure groups and failed to win the Oscar, he found an audience for the film. But that success said more about his populist instincts than about the book’s own appeal. The story around The English Patient is a seductive one in Hollywood: it is a film that tapped into that elusive older audience. After a traumatic production, the film made money and won Oscars, but from the start it was more famous than Michael Ondaatje’s novel. And while there were Ondaatje fans who thought that the book had been grotesquely simplified, they were outnumbered by people for whom The English Patient only existed as a film. That was never the case with Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Shipping News which will always be – like Mike Nichols’s Catch-22 – ‘the film of the book’. It’s rare to find a Doctor Zhivago, a Room At The Top or a Trainspotting where the book and the adaptation have similar status. The tricky part is the voice. That might be why The Secret History has been gathering dust for most of a decade, although Gwyneth Paltrow now plans to produce it. Donna Tartt’s book is hardly serious literature: it’s an enjoyably lurid murder story about a bunch of spoilt college students. But reduce it to those bare elements and it could be little more than a generic teen thriller starring a couple of kids from Dawson’s Creek. What the director and writer need to do is find a way of permeating the snobbishness and high intellectual pretension of the book’s narrator. And the voice is why trying to turn A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius into a workable script will be a fearsome task. Attempt to replicate Eggers’s relentless playfulness, which starts on the copyright page, and you have the makings of an immensely annoying film. Take out the knowing games and you could end up with a sentimental tale about a young man bringing up his younger brother after the death of their parents fit only for Channel 5. That won’t stop producers from buying the next smart book to creep on to the bestseller list. Lynn Pleshette, the agent involved in getting The Shipping News to the screen, explains: ‘Hollywood will always buy novels because too many scripts in development or spec scripts lack interesting characters living in newly created stories. As you know, Hollywood thrives on being derivative, although any novel or original script could always be ruined. This is a collaborative medium where wrong turns in development, casting and direction can be taken – yet producers and studios will never give up hope that a fresh piece of material could make for a great film. Hope still springs eternal.’ But perhaps the bookishly inclined need to take less direct routes. It’s easy to see why Iris Murdoch’s life seemed a better starting point for a film than most of her novels. Better still is The Royal Tenenbaums, due out here on 15 March. It’s a film in love with books in which most of the characters have written books (the immaculately designed covers of which we see). There are characters at least partly based on Oliver Sacks and Cormac McCarthy, and the whole thing is steeped in the spirit of J.D. Salinger. There is even a stately narrator. But it’s not based on a book, it was written for the screen. Everything in it fits perfectly, and it has no readers with impossible expectations to meet. Charlotte Gray opens on 22 February, The Shipping News on 1 March

Other articles

A MILLION WORD ESSAY

A MILLION WORD ESSAY by Jay Kennedy

Questions: 1
Time: limited by life
Required: No less than ONE MILLION WORDS as your answer

Note: Do not answer until you get to the test question.

Instead of thinking of things being cool, or proper, or "the right way," think of how you want them to be. What bothers you about life and what would you like to change? If art is something you want to seriously persue. then you will be seriously adding something to the world. the question is, what do you want to add? Do you want to send a message? What message? Who should hear this message? How should it be presented?

If your answers to those questions are general, then you have not truly thought about the question. the question then becomes an annoyance, something you want to swat like a fly, instead of conquering like a hero. You can't conquer without knowing your opponent. Your oppenent is "why." Your answer is "why not." Your future will elaborate specifically why not. If you have to think about it, then you haven't thought about it. Does it matter to you what others think of you, or your beliefs? Or is it more important to you to be yourself? Do things seem okay, but slightly better if altered in a way that you just thought of? Can you make them that way? Do you WANT to make them that way? Can you live with yourself if you don't make them that way? How irresistable is the urge? Is there any urge at all?

Never be lazy to yourself. To be lazy, is to think about the fact that you're not doing something else. To do something else, is to not be lazy.

Maybe you think all of that is deep. do you know why you think it is deep? Could you say why in 25 words or less? Could you say why in 1,000,000 words or more? Do you fear writing 1,000,000 words or more about what you believe in?

Do you HAVE 1,000,000 words to say about ANYTHING? Is there anything WORTH 1,000,000 words? If so, will you say them? When?

Can you live with yourself if you don't?

Do you call yourself an artist? If not, are you an artist?

QUESTION ONE: (read the question carefully)

What are your instructions that you need to read before answering your test question?

Реферат на тему In The Beginning Was The Word Essay

In The Beginning Was The Word Essay, Research Paper

In the beginning was the wordIf Scott Rudin wasn’t a millionaire Hollywood producer, it might be possible to feel a little sorry for him right now. Because Rudin has engineered a couple of years of headaches and resentment for himself which, recent history suggests, will end up in an unsatisfactory outcome. First, he found a director (Stephen Daldry) and a writer (David Hare) to adapt Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections, the film rights to which he optioned personally before the book was published. Then, last week, he got together with New Line to produce the film version of Dave Eggers’s A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius. So far, so good. But The Corrections will be hard work to adapt. (It is interesting that Rudin has called in Brits to tackle the current contender for the Great American Novel.) A Heartbreaking Work… will be almost impossible, which is why, despite the film rights going for a hefty $2 million, the project had been sitting around at New Line for a year before Rudin showed an interest. The lure and the curse of these books lie with their readers. It’s the struggle going on right now to get filmgoers interested in The Shipping News: the obvious audience, the people who have read E. Annie Proulx’s novel, are the most sceptical. You can tempt them with the Newfoundland scenery and a heavyweight cast but they are wary. The Corrections will have the same battle. When Rudin bought the rights, the most he could expect was another well-reviewed, little-read literary novel. But it turned into something else and joined books such as The Shipping News, Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow, Snow Falling on Cedars, Birdsong, The Secret History and Captain Corelli’s Mandolin in that elusive category: the big bourgeois hit. There seems to be one every season. Books which everyone you know suddenly seems to be reading. Books you get given several times as presents. They are all novels that seem clever enough to be respectable yet suit people who don’t have time to read that much fiction, and they work for various generations and both genders. Often they are books that appear from nowhere and achieve a fame that eclipses everything else the author has written; on the poster for the film version of Sebastian Faulks’s Charlotte Gray, there’s a bright red circle telling us that it is ‘by the author of Birdsong ‘. In theory, those readers should provide a core audience for the film version. That should be part of the advantage of adapting a bestselling book, and it worked for Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Lord of the Rings and Bridget Jones’s Diary. You don’t spend $57m on a Captain Corelli without hoping that there is a large group of people who want to see it. But it didn’t work for Corelli – or for Snow Falling on Cedars and Smilla. (’Have they made a film of Snow Falling on Cedars?’ I was asked a couple of times while working on this article.) And it hasn’t worked for The Shipping News which has struggled at the US box office. It’s not a bad film but it’s not a particularly good one either. It is as forgettable as E. Annie Proulx’s novel is memorable. It lacks strangeness: director Lasse Hallström has found no cinematic answer to Proulx’s sparse prose and unsettling sense of place, and he has got close to admitting as much. ‘Annie so boldly uses everything she knows about the island, piecing it together like a collage, a mix of poetry and trivia, comedy and drama, the lyrical images, the tapestry of disparate elements. The challenge to capture the atmosphere of the novel for the screen was a somewhat crazy idea. I’m very happy that I was able to try.’ Proulx’s ugly, hulking central character doesn’t sound like any known leading man, certainly not John Travolta who was originally pencilled in for the role. But although Travolta would almost certainly have been a disaster, the eventual cast of Kevin Spacey, Julianne Moore, Judi Dench, Pete Postlethwaite and Cate Blanchett has a bullying aura of Quality Cinema to it. Hallström, too, has a track record with this kind of project, having made The Shipping News straight after Chocolat and The Cider House Rules. When it comes to Hollywood and contemporary literature, the same names keep cropping up – Rudin produced Wonder Boys (not to mention Iris and Angela’s Ashes); Miramax made the three Hallström films and were involved with Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. The English Patient and All The Pretty Horses (another flop). And then there’s Steven Spielberg (The Color Purple, Empire Of The Sun, Schindler’s List). The Color Purple and The English Patient are the interesting ones here. Alice Walker’s novel was a classic word-of-mouth success. There were issues of race and sexuality, it was told in the form of letters and in this country it came in a distinctly unglossy Women’s Press edition. People felt righteous reading it. Steven Spielberg probably did too, which might explain why he chose to make the film that was going to transform him from that shark-and-aliens guy into a serious director. The strange thing was that, while Spielberg got attacked by gay and black pressure groups and failed to win the Oscar, he found an audience for the film. But that success said more about his populist instincts than about the book’s own appeal. The story around The English Patient is a seductive one in Hollywood: it is a film that tapped into that elusive older audience. After a traumatic production, the film made money and won Oscars, but from the start it was more famous than Michael Ondaatje’s novel. And while there were Ondaatje fans who thought that the book had been grotesquely simplified, they were outnumbered by people for whom The English Patient only existed as a film. That was never the case with Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Shipping News which will always be – like Mike Nichols’s Catch-22 – ‘the film of the book’. It’s rare to find a Doctor Zhivago, a Room At The Top or a Trainspotting where the book and the adaptation have similar status. The tricky part is the voice. That might be why The Secret History has been gathering dust for most of a decade, although Gwyneth Paltrow now plans to produce it. Donna Tartt’s book is hardly serious literature: it’s an enjoyably lurid murder story about a bunch of spoilt college students. But reduce it to those bare elements and it could be little more than a generic teen thriller starring a couple of kids from Dawson’s Creek. What the director and writer need to do is find a way of permeating the snobbishness and high intellectual pretension of the book’s narrator. And the voice is why trying to turn A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius into a workable script will be a fearsome task. Attempt to replicate Eggers’s relentless playfulness, which starts on the copyright page, and you have the makings of an immensely annoying film. Take out the knowing games and you could end up with a sentimental tale about a young man bringing up his younger brother after the death of their parents fit only for Channel 5. That won’t stop producers from buying the next smart book to creep on to the bestseller list. Lynn Pleshette, the agent involved in getting The Shipping News to the screen, explains: ‘Hollywood will always buy novels because too many scripts in development or spec scripts lack interesting characters living in newly created stories. As you know, Hollywood thrives on being derivative, although any novel or original script could always be ruined. This is a collaborative medium where wrong turns in development, casting and direction can be taken – yet producers and studios will never give up hope that a fresh piece of material could make for a great film. Hope still springs eternal.’ But perhaps the bookishly inclined need to take less direct routes. It’s easy to see why Iris Murdoch’s life seemed a better starting point for a film than most of her novels. Better still is The Royal Tenenbaums, due out here on 15 March. It’s a film in love with books in which most of the characters have written books (the immaculately designed covers of which we see). There are characters at least partly based on Oliver Sacks and Cormac McCarthy, and the whole thing is steeped in the spirit of J.D. Salinger. There is even a stately narrator. But it’s not based on a book, it was written for the screen. Everything in it fits perfectly, and it has no readers with impossible expectations to meet. Charlotte Gray opens on 22 February, The Shipping News on 1 March

Stuart Armstrong: Celtic move left me with no time to do 2, 000-word university essay

Stuart Armstrong: Celtic move left me with no time to do 2,000-word university essay

By Pa Reporter 17:36 GMT 03 Feb 2015, updated 17:46 GMT 03 Feb 2015

  • Stuart Armstrong moved from Dundee United to Celtic on Monday
  • Armstrong said the move had left him with no time to do university work
  • The 22-year-old is doing an Open University law degree
  • Gary Mackay-Steven also made the same move on transfer deadline day

Stuart Armstrong will spend Tuesday night hastily writing an Open University law degree essay after it was put on hold to complete his transfer to Celtic.

The 22-year-old midfielder made the move from Dundee United to Parkhead on Monday, signing a three-and-a-half-year deal just before the transfer window closed.

He was joined by team-mate Gary Mackay-Steven, who, having already signed a pre-contract agreement with the Hoops, fast-forwarded his departure from Tannadice after the two clubs agreed a fee.

The 24-year-old winger signed a four-and-a-half-year deal with the Tayside club reportedly raking in a total of around £2million.

At a joint press conference at Celtic Park, Armstrong confirmed his reputation as one of the game's more cerebral players.

He said: 'It has been a busy couple of days. I have an essay due tomorrow morning of 2,000 words that I haven't even started.

'So once I am done here, I will crack on with that.

'I have got a few months of this year (left) and two more years after that.

'I go through about a month each year thinking about packing it in but I think I will see it through.

'It is a nice thing to have. I had a lot of free time in the afternoon and it was something I was quite interested in at school.

'I had a look at the Open University and the process - not the work - seemed easy enough.

'And it is useful. It keeps your mind on other thing sometimes.

'I wouldn't say it is the necessary route for everyone, I think everyone has their own interests.

'But sometimes it is important to keep your mind off football.'

Example Essays: Million Dollars

1. Million Dollar Money Maker

Many times we feel a unique urge to possess an item that looks like a million dollars in an ad, because we think that we deserve to feel like a million dollars, and surly if it looks like a million dollars on paper, there's no way it wouldn't make you feel like it. What makes us feel like a million bucks in our society? In a lot of ways sex, pleasure, and money make us feel like a million bucks, but in other ways generosity, self-conviction and self-worth make us feel that way too.

2. 10 million dollar essay

Can you believe I have ten million dollars. The tickets cost 7,200 dollars. Within a week I had purchased a house in the beautiful town of Quogue, Long Island for 1.2 million dollars. I started a part-time job delivering auto parts to local mechanic shops for 7 dollars per hour. This gave me some spending money away from the 10 million and also took up some of my free time I was looking to get rid of.

3. 10 million dollar essay

Can you believe I have ten million dollars. The tickets cost 7,200 dollars. Within a week I had purchased a house in the beautiful town of Quogue, Long Island for 1.2 million dollars. I started a part-time job delivering auto parts to local mechanic shops for 7 dollars per hour. This gave me some spending money away from the 10 million and also took up some of my free time I was looking to get rid of.

4. $2.3 Million Bargain

The 2.3 million dollar bargain is an article that appeared on the CNN/Money website. The author, Chris Isidore, a senior writer, explains that any advertisers should be happy to write a check for nearly 2.3 million dollars for 30 seconds air time during the peak of the Super Bowl. As Isidore points out, that is 75,000 dollars per second. For example, Isidore says, that NBC is going to charge 2 million dollars for a thirty second ad during the series finale of the show "FriendsaE. Overtime ads are sold for a premium, because rating soar when there is overtime during a Super Bowl.I.

5. Effects of Dollarization on the World Economy

Furthermore, this paper will provide the clarification relates to dollarization in Cambodia such as; existing of dollarization, influences of dollarization, advantages of dollarization, disadvantages of dollarization, and emergence of dollarization clearly. What is the Dollarization. Obviously, the official semi-dollarization is very common and acceptable for Cambodia to conduct dollarization in economy. Evaluating Dollarization in the World Economy 1.1. Based on the existence of dollar, dollarization has been being applied to many countries in the world.

6. IF I WON TEN MILLION DOLLARS

If I won 10 million dollars, the first three things I would do are: running an animal rescue, building a children center, and purchasing a cottage. This was a dream from childhood, and it would realize at last with the 10 million dollars. These colorful trees would make life beautiful.I had so many dreams and ideas about what I would do with the 10 million dollars.

7. Oldsmobile Three Hundred Million Dollar Flop

Oldsmobile"s Three Hundred Million Dollar Flop "This is not your father"s OldsmobileaEIn 1988, Oldsmobile launched a massive advertising campaign to attract a younger generation of buyers. In 1985, Oldsmobile sold more than a million cars, by 1990; their sales were under half a million.

8. Recycling: Paper or Plastic?

This is a question that millions of Americans are faced with daily, whether when buying groceries at a local supermarket or packing a lunch to take to work. Debates regarding this million-dollar question have been around for decades, as enthusiasts for both sides have strong and firm advantages and disadvantages that strengthen each case. If all the Americans who used plastic bags used paper bags instead in the year of 2013, this would have drastically increased our solid waste by over 100 million tons, taking up more than seven times the landfill space (Ketcham).

9. Philosophy and Science

Instrumental value may be someone who has a million dollars, but money does not by them the intrinsic value of being happy. Someone's happiness can be their intrinsic value, just as having a million dollars can be the instrumental value. But by someone being happy, is just that, they are happy, it is not providing anything else as the million dollars, while it would be great to have, and it is only as good as you use it.

10. The All American Chair

This one chair allowed La-Z-Boy sales to go from 1.1 million dollars to 52.7 million dollars in a single decade (La-Z-Boy). Even today La-Z-Boy remains a multi million-dollar corporation and sales are still up. At the end of 2001 La-Z-Boy"s sales were estimated at 2,256,197 dollars, a leap from the 2000 years end at 1,782,916 dollars (Making).

11. MF Global Missing Hundreds of Millions of Customer Money

MF Global caused a fit of panic on October 31st after federal regulators discovered that hundreds of millions of dollars in customers' money was missing from the company's vaults. Originally, federal investigators believed that $950 million was missing from the MF Global accounts, but now they believe less than $700 million are unaccounted for.

12. requirements eng

Overview:The client is a globally recognized multi-billion dollar organization with 150 years in the telecommunication industry. The telecommunication devices they built often have to be introduced from countries to countries, which happens to cost the organization millions of dollars in travel expenses. Thus aswell as the ability to send humans through these portals, Thus these control system can also:*ave ability to send items or things through the portal using a high tech package bag,*highly secured security,*check for the health status of each person who go though the portalsAll of the.

13. Napster ethical

Would you rather pay at least fifteen dollars or nothing for a cd. Accomplished musicians have always made a new cd and sold it for a profit, the almighty dollar bill. "The other problem that musicians have is that they truly can"t back up the claim that Napster has taken away approximately $12 million worth of album salesaE (Smith). Today Napster is a multimillion-dollar business that still has not produced significant revenue.

14. Overpaying Athletes

These pros earn on average 49,000 dollars a year, but the best professional athletes earn millions of dollars per year. The pros get paid millions of dollars to play a sport that many people would play for fun. The average NBA player makes on average upwards of 5.15 million dollars a year, and the average MLB player makes 3.2 million. Aaron is going to make 110 million dollars over the course of five years. The last thing they should be worried about is making millions of more dollars.

15. None_Provided

Does success have to mean millions and millions of dollars. Making millions and millions of dollars comes farther down the chain of priorities. If the employees give 80%, rather than 100%, that could mean millions of dollars lost due to lack of motivating the employees.

16. Holocaust

Six million. This is a large number by anyone's account, whether it is dollars, days, or human lives. How could one measure the significance of six million lives, it would be impossible to. Six million people are fully one fifth of one per-cent of the world's population. Six million lives, gone.

17. New Deal

The "Tweed Ring" in New York was a ring of cronies working together in order to steal millions of dollars from New York companies. While it was the ring was in business it gathered somewhere between 30,000,000 to 200,000,000 dollars cash.

18. Are Athletes Overpaid?

The average professional athlete makes over a million dollars a year. But some don"t fathom how much 22 million dollars a year is. You"d have to win a million dollars on "Who wants to be a MillionaireaE 22 times. He would have been signed to a multi-million dollar contract and gotten millions in endorsements. But no one should make millions of dollars just to play a game.

19. Professional Athletes and PEDs

Keep in mind he has a guaranteed contract of over 100 million dollars over the next 3 years. My question to you is would you keep this man with such high ranks and expectations at the risk of his prime days behind him or release with the cost of paying 21 million dollars over each of the next 3 years. Yankees owe him 21 million dollars for the coming season and a total of 61 million dollars over the next 3 seasons to complete the 10 year, 275 million dollar deal he signed in 2007. You may never know he could possibly produce and prove people wrong in a way to redeem himself or just.

20. TOLLS

In a city as big as New York, and who brings in millions of tourist a year, it is hard to believe that we are in a finically hardship. New York city is in a 5 billion dollar budget deficit. Now he has another mountain to over come and that is raising 5 billion dollars in a city that is seeing one of its hardest economics times in years.One idea Bloomberg has brought forth is putting tolls on the free bridges that connects the 5 boroughs such as Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queensbury Bridge. Which over half a million people travel over every week for free.But with t.

21. Titantic

In 1997, James Cameron and a 200 million dollar budget created a romantic epic about this tragedy entitled The Titanic. With a budget of over two million dollars and a set built to exact specifications, The Titanic was the most expensive movie ever made to this day. According to Peter Waal, author of "The Making of James Cameron,aE Cameron explained spending more than 100 million dollars over budget to Fox Century executives by stating that the scale of the movie was proportional to the scale of the event. Also according to Waal, the RMS Titanic was recreated on a 7/8 scale an.

22. The History of the RMS Titanic Reincarnated by The Titanic

In 1997, James Cameron and a 200 million dollar budget created a romantic epic about this tragedy entitled The Titanic. With a budget of over two million dollars and a set built to exact specifications, The Titanic was the most expensive movie ever made to this day. According to Peter Waal, author of "The Making of James Cameron,aE Cameron explained spending more than 100 million dollars over budget to Fox Century executives by stating that the scale of the movie was proportional to the scale of the event. Also according to Waal, the RMS Titanic was recreated on a 7/8 scale an.

23. Finances

They are a company that has net sales that are around 52,170 million dollars. Their operating income is almost 406.9 billion dollars. When you are talking about 11.5 million engines sold, your talking about an important company. Their net income was 1,874,423,000 dollars. They plan to sell 7 million motorcycles, 3 million automobiles, and 6 million power products.

Los Angeles, California Essay

Los Angeles, California Essay | Essay Comparing Two Cities -- New York and Los Angeles

Summary: A conparison and contrast of the cities of New York and Los Angeles. While the two cities are on opposite coasts and have different weather patterns, they share a number of similarities in terms of population, history, and activities.

Compare and Contrast Essay: Two Cities NYC and L.A

New York City has been through a tragedy in the past few years. The 9/11 attacks has made a huge impact on the United States. Despite that event, Los Angeles is a popular city just as well as New York; they have many similarities and differences based on topics like location, population, climate, history, and activities.

New York City is located in New York State; it lies on the Hudson River, and has a population of 18 million people. Los Angeles is located in California with a population of 3.5 million people. These two cities are on opposite coasts, New York is on the east and Los Angeles is on the west, with that fact it's obvious that these cities have different temperatures. In the summer, New York City can reach from 70-90 degrees, and Los Angeles can reach from anywhere.

This section contains 486 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)

Should prisoners be made to do 500 calculus problems and 100 million word essays as a punishment?

Should prisoners be made to do 500 calculus problems and 100 million word essays as a punishment?

I think this idea is very interesting idea-- using the correlation between education level and crime rate as inspiration for a new category of punishment. It'd be spectacular if it worked; however, there are a few issues that come to mind immediately:

1.) Socioeconomic status affects jail time.

This, in itself, speaks volumes about the quality of the punishment. An individual who grew up with the privilege of an excellent education would be far more likely to be able to complete the problems at all, and if all incarcerated were able to, surely those with better educations could complete the tasks more quickly. With the correlations between socioeconomic status, race, and education that persist today, this punishment is unfair and its discriminatory nature would act as a wedge, further widening the gap between the classes. which is pretty good fuel for any opponents looking to tear it to pieces.

2.) It is more than absurd to ask someone to write a 100 million word essay.

Just to put one hundred million words into perspective. War and Peace by Tolstoy, which is quite the tome, is only 560,000 words. Writing one hundred million words is equivalent to writing 200 War and Peaces-- enough to fill a personal library. While it seems feasible that this is doable within a lifetime, it would be a monumental task. Asking anybody save the most dedicated of writers to even attempt this is almost certainly futile. If the goal is a life sentence, then this would make a fine one, I suppose, but then we may as well give a life sentence.

tl;dr: No, probably not.

Written 29w ago · Not for Reproduction

Mega Essays

MegaEssays.com 1. Millions of Cats

Millions of CatsGenre: I found this book to be Reality. It is about animals, millions of cats. . When the old man returns he has brought back millions of cats. . The minor character is the millions of cats. . She then moves to New York were there is millions of people. .

2. Hinduism 330 million gods

Hinduism: 330 Million GodsThe film, Hinduism 330 Million Gods, gave a basic overview of Hinduism. It focuses primarily on the Hindu concept of the divine, religious practices and the stages of life. It derived most of its information from ordinary Hindus with some commentary from some more edu.

3. China

It costed ten million lives of their people. . China's oil-production 3.3 million bbl/day. . China imports 1.207 million bbl/day of oil. . China's labor force is 778.1 million. .

4. The American Red Cross strateg

Approximately 1.2 million people volunteer for the Red Cross, which makes up 90% of their work force.1The American Red Cross is also non-profit organization that is committed to saving lives and easing suffering. . They must rely on the good hearts and contributions of millions of Americans. . Its staff is largely volunteer -- more than .

5. The Man of a Million Faces 19. TargetAnalysisStudy

Problems:*Mervyn's Department Store*Marshall Field's Department StoreFacts / Assumptions:Fact*Mervyn's operating profit has declined from $280 million in 1997 to $238 million in 2002. *Marshall Field's operating profit has declined from $240 million to $125 million in 2002.. Net income rose 25% to $438 million. . During the quar.

20. Children's Right 21. Black Holes 22. The Bomb that Saved Millions 23. hitler 24. Smoking: An enderment to every

In 1999, an estimated 45.7 million adults were former smokers. Of the current 46.5 million smokers, more than 32 million persons reported they wanted to quit smoking completely. . From 1950 to 2000, tobacco will have killed more than 60 million people in developed countries alone, more than died in World War II. . If current trends&.

25. Civil War South Vs. North 1. Millions of Cats

Millions of CatsGenre: I found this book to be Reality. It is about animals, millions of cats. . When the old man returns he has brought back millions of cats. . The minor character is the millions of cats. . She then moves to New York were there is millions of people. .

2. Hinduism 330 million gods

Hinduism: 330 Million GodsThe film, Hinduism 330 Million Gods, gave a basic overview of Hinduism. It focuses primarily on the Hindu concept of the divine, religious practices and the stages of life. It derived most of its information from ordinary Hindus with some commentary from some more edu.

3. China

It costed ten million lives of their people. . China's oil-production 3.3 million bbl/day. . China imports 1.207 million bbl/day of oil. . China's labor force is 778.1 million. .

4. The American Red Cross strateg

Approximately 1.2 million people volunteer for the Red Cross, which makes up 90% of their work force.1The American Red Cross is also non-profit organization that is committed to saving lives and easing suffering. . They must rely on the good hearts and contributions of millions of Americans. . Its staff is largely volunteer -- more than .

5. The Man of a Million Faces 19. TargetAnalysisStudy

Problems:*Mervyn's Department Store*Marshall Field's Department StoreFacts / Assumptions:Fact*Mervyn's operating profit has declined from $280 million in 1997 to $238 million in 2002. *Marshall Field's operating profit has declined from $240 million to $125 million in 2002.. Net income rose 25% to $438 million. . During the quar.

20. Children's Right 21. Black Holes 22. The Bomb that Saved Millions 23. hitler 24. Smoking: An enderment to every

In 1999, an estimated 45.7 million adults were former smokers. Of the current 46.5 million smokers, more than 32 million persons reported they wanted to quit smoking completely. . From 1950 to 2000, tobacco will have killed more than 60 million people in developed countries alone, more than died in World War II. . If current trends&.

25. Civil War South Vs. North

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